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Classical Education and the Homeschool

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As we survey the educational ruins around us, classical and Christian education appears to be an idea whose time has come again. More and more Christian parents are seeing the failures of modern education, and they are hungering for a substantive alternative, one that has been tested before and found to be good. Classical and Christian education presents them with just suc As we survey the educational ruins around us, classical and Christian education appears to be an idea whose time has come again. More and more Christian parents are seeing the failures of modern education, and they are hungering for a substantive alternative, one that has been tested before and found to be good. Classical and Christian education presents them with just such an alternative.


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As we survey the educational ruins around us, classical and Christian education appears to be an idea whose time has come again. More and more Christian parents are seeing the failures of modern education, and they are hungering for a substantive alternative, one that has been tested before and found to be good. Classical and Christian education presents them with just suc As we survey the educational ruins around us, classical and Christian education appears to be an idea whose time has come again. More and more Christian parents are seeing the failures of modern education, and they are hungering for a substantive alternative, one that has been tested before and found to be good. Classical and Christian education presents them with just such an alternative.

30 review for Classical Education and the Homeschool

  1. 4 out of 5

    Stacy

    I picked up this book after 5 years of classically homeschooling and 20 years of homeschooling. I did not need to be convinced of much of the material for the reason to classical homeschool my children still remaining at home. I really thought this book would be a simple review of all that I understand of a classical education. I was very pleased to enjoy the book and be inspired that it is my role as parent who acknowledges my own education was lacking and that I want more for my children in th I picked up this book after 5 years of classically homeschooling and 20 years of homeschooling. I did not need to be convinced of much of the material for the reason to classical homeschool my children still remaining at home. I really thought this book would be a simple review of all that I understand of a classical education. I was very pleased to enjoy the book and be inspired that it is my role as parent who acknowledges my own education was lacking and that I want more for my children in their education. The first chapter opens with a frankness that this will not come easy, but instead will require "the necessity of hard work." Chapter 8 was profound to me. I love to read and find after moving to a classical style of homeschool that my love for books grew to a taste for better books and more challenging reads. So in Chapter 8 it is encouraged that they "state emphatically that the reading of the teacher is more important then the reading of the student. If the teacher reads as he should, the reading of the student will naturally fall into place." There will always be a need for more books. Yay! I love that. And then in the last paragraph they state, "We(the teacher/parent) should remember that with such preparatory reading, a good pace to maintain is to try and finish a book every week or two. This may seem intimidating at first, and if it were considered a hobby, it would be overwhelming. But the task is the education of your children, which is not a hobby but a vocation. The word vocation comes form the Latin verb coco, which means "I call." A person's vocations is his calling; a parent's vocation is to learn in order to teach." WOW! Needless to say I am glad I spend a few hours to read this little gem of a book!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mystie Winckler

    Fourth or fifth read. Own. This takes only an hour or two to read, and it's a good brief introduction or reminder read. The first two times I read it I was totally overwhelmed and glad we were trying to start a school. After the school plans failed, and I realized how much overwhelming work a school would be too, I came back to it and it didn't seem so daunting. I appreciated the emphasis that classical education doesn't come in a ready-made or one-size-fits-all box from UPS and that imagination Fourth or fifth read. Own. This takes only an hour or two to read, and it's a good brief introduction or reminder read. The first two times I read it I was totally overwhelmed and glad we were trying to start a school. After the school plans failed, and I realized how much overwhelming work a school would be too, I came back to it and it didn't seem so daunting. I appreciated the emphasis that classical education doesn't come in a ready-made or one-size-fits-all box from UPS and that imagination and books is where it begins and has its foundations. The heavy emphasis on trivium as pedagogy is losing its charm as I broaden my own education readings, sounding now more like Gradgrind Facts in the grammar stage, but I know from the other education books and articles Doug has written that that is not his intention. This is a book I will continue to return to often.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sara Fukuda

    A short book, outlining basically what the classical method is. My favorite part is when the question is asked: “what is meant by a Christian worldview and a Christian education?” Answer: “it is NOT a secular education with a prayer and a bible class attached to it. Rather, we view the scriptures as the sole rule of faith and practice. The Bible must be central to our thinking. Not central how a vase is placed at the center of a table (nice, but decorative only), but rather central like how an a A short book, outlining basically what the classical method is. My favorite part is when the question is asked: “what is meant by a Christian worldview and a Christian education?” Answer: “it is NOT a secular education with a prayer and a bible class attached to it. Rather, we view the scriptures as the sole rule of faith and practice. The Bible must be central to our thinking. Not central how a vase is placed at the center of a table (nice, but decorative only), but rather central like how an axel is central.” LOVED that bit.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Gary

    Ariel and I read this together in small chunks. I have read before, but the review is updated since completion. Takes the work done by Wilson and others on the need for Christian classical education and shows how it might best be achieved in a home-education setting. Liked it a lot. Favorite part: the elegant section on the power of words and language.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This was a short, pithy introduction to classically educating your child at home. The logic section simultaneously dazzled me and made my head swim. It makes me want to re-pursue Latin and learn logic. There is a recommended reading list at the back which is fairly challenging. Perhpas it is time to take my Plutarch books from college off the shelf and actually read them. I am also reading Climbing Parnassus, and this was a helpful accompaniment to that.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Anda P

    This one shed some light on a philosophical conundrum I was having. Charlotte Mason says the only thing that reason is good for is giving logical demonstration of 1. Math 2. An idea already accepted by the will. I agree with this! However, Thomas Aquinas believed that you could use reason to guide your natural acts, he called it the law of Nature. I was puzzled here because I respect the force of intellect that was Aquinas. Anyway, this book said Protestant educators will have problems when they This one shed some light on a philosophical conundrum I was having. Charlotte Mason says the only thing that reason is good for is giving logical demonstration of 1. Math 2. An idea already accepted by the will. I agree with this! However, Thomas Aquinas believed that you could use reason to guide your natural acts, he called it the law of Nature. I was puzzled here because I respect the force of intellect that was Aquinas. Anyway, this book said Protestant educators will have problems when they read Aquinas and that struck a light bulb for me! I’m not the only one! Overall a good short book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    End quote hits home- "The education of the children for God is the most important business done on earth. it is the one business for which all the earth exists. To it all politics, all war, all literature, all money-making, ought to be subordinated: and every parent especially ought to feel, every hour of the day, that next to making his own calling and election sure, this is the end for which he is kept alive by God-this is his task on earth." -R.L. Dabney

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shaina Herrmann

    I'm confused by the title. There is very little mention of homeschool in this book. There was quite a bit great about CE, which was a lot of repeat info for me. So I didn't really gain much from reading this but for someone new to CE it is a good intro.

  9. 4 out of 5

    amanda gardiner

    A great little primer. I need ALOT more information then this, but this covered a lot of topics in a tiny book. The appendixes are very helpful and the chapter on logic was my favourite.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Adam Calvert

    Very short ( Each chapter is insightful and helpful regarding a Biblical outlook of education and the advantages of a classical education. It calls for high standards for both the students and the parents, but rightfully so. Included at the end is a helpful "Getting Started" reading list for parents as well as resources on where to go to find more information and resourc Very short (<70 pages including the appendices), but a great primer for Christian parents who want to homeschool their children classically. Each chapter is insightful and helpful regarding a Biblical outlook of education and the advantages of a classical education. It calls for high standards for both the students and the parents, but rightfully so. Included at the end is a helpful "Getting Started" reading list for parents as well as resources on where to go to find more information and resources for classical Christian homeschool education. In short, a valuable resource for Biblically minded parents who are thinking of how to best (and most Biblically) educate their children. To know more about "classically" I recommend Douglas Wilson's 'The Case for Classical Christian Education'. But this book is a good start!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Gardiner

    A short introduction to classical education and teaching it in the context of the home. I love the emphasis on teaching logic and rhetoric but disagree with the necessity of learning Latin and reading the secular classics of Western Civilization. I think understanding how Latin works is helpful, and understanding what the classics are and a summary of them is important. However, learning the language and reading the classics in full is not something I think everyone should do, only those who sho A short introduction to classical education and teaching it in the context of the home. I love the emphasis on teaching logic and rhetoric but disagree with the necessity of learning Latin and reading the secular classics of Western Civilization. I think understanding how Latin works is helpful, and understanding what the classics are and a summary of them is important. However, learning the language and reading the classics in full is not something I think everyone should do, only those who show a special interest. If my kids want to read Plato and Aristotle, they can, but I won't be assigning them as a requirement. We'll be taking some of this methodology and meshing it with our own eclectic approach.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Both classical education and homeschooling have been a part of my life for as long as I can remember: it's how I was taught to learn, and it's how I learned to teach. Because of that, I was already familiar with the concepts laid out in this guide. At just over 60 pages, this book is brief but is an excellent starting point for anyone looking to give their kids a strong education--as well as anyone wanting to check and even correct the state of their own learning.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Kuranaga

    I am grateful for the encouragement found within this little book. There are different takeaways from it, but the one that will stand out the most to me is the exhortation for teachers. Teachers must be readers and they must read more than their students. In other words, parents need to be reading all the time and applying the truth of Scripture to what they read. I also appreciate the list of various books the authors encourage us to read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    John Dube

    These bros are intense. I can’t think of a better way of scaring people than telling them they have to read 100+ books to be an effective classical homeschooler. As it is, this is either your thing or not. I have personally seen the benefits of classical pedagogy and commend it wholeheartedly. This tiny monograph however, I recommend with caution. If your interested in classical methodology read Sayers, Lewis, or Schaeffer first. You will thank me.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Anita Harkness

    A good short introduction to classical education and homeschooling. It speaks more on the benefits and components of classical education than it does of how to make it work in a homeschool setting where there are multiple learning levels. I finished the book being encouraged to seek out more resources and grow in knowledge and skills in order to reach my children.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Marie Heiderscheit

    This was a quick but relevant read on the Christian emphasis of Classical education. I appreciate it's defining of the parts and reasons behind what it studied in a classical education, and also its tying of all that is studied to the sovereignty of our Creator. Also, the list of suggested reading and resources in the conclusion of the book is helpful.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Vincent Stewart

    Great read Every Christian parent considering homeschooling their children should read this book! I highly recommended taking the time to sit down and read through this short book and carefully weigh the arguments presented

  18. 5 out of 5

    David Skinner

    This book adequately describes the basic tenets of Classical Education in a succinct and concise manner. The authors argue for the concept of Grammar, Dialectic, and Rhetoric in Christian education, in either a private school education or homeschool context.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tee Pegg

    This book is a lot thinner than I had anticipated. This proved to not matter as the book packs a punch and each sentence is useful and important, as well as convicting. This book is not one to be skimmed, but read and reread!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

    A great primer on Classical Christian education.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Josiah Richardson

    A decent overview of classical education and its implementation.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Mauney

    Very concise overview of a Christ Centered Classical education in a homeschool setting. Pushes you in the right direction to do more research.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mel Foster

    Good basic intro to the topic. Good short reference. A few quirky statements.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Logan Seibert

    Concise yet covers a lot of ground in introducing the subject. Would recommend as such.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    Great import, crammed into so few pages.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Deanna Weigel

    Great intro to classical Christian education.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Carleton Raisbeck

    It's helped me to realize that home schooling any children I might have is actually a possibility. Rather than handing them over to people who have views I don't agree with for an education that's not worth while, I may have the choice to raise them in a classically Christian way. This book is an introduction into how that could be done. And with the rather large list of around 100 titles at the back recommended as a 'start' or introductory reading, there's one thing he makes clear: to teach a c It's helped me to realize that home schooling any children I might have is actually a possibility. Rather than handing them over to people who have views I don't agree with for an education that's not worth while, I may have the choice to raise them in a classically Christian way. This book is an introduction into how that could be done. And with the rather large list of around 100 titles at the back recommended as a 'start' or introductory reading, there's one thing he makes clear: to teach a child successfully this way takes a lot of work! I have moved on to reading another book of Doug's called Recovering the Lost Tools of Learning, where in it he writes about about the poor state of the American state education and makes a good case for a Classical Christian education. If you need further convincing about how the alternatives to mainstream education can be superior to its counterpart, or just wanted to learn more about the process of raising children in the faith, this other book could be helpful too.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Matt Pitts

    In their own words this is a "brief overview" that aims to give "homeschool parents new to classical and Christian education...a little more grounding on the subject." It accomplishes that aim quite well. It gives an overview of what classical education is and gives the reader fair warning of the hard work involved in providing it in a homeschool setting in a way that challenges rather than discourages. This book can easily be read in an afternoon and includes a helpful but sufficiently brief "w In their own words this is a "brief overview" that aims to give "homeschool parents new to classical and Christian education...a little more grounding on the subject." It accomplishes that aim quite well. It gives an overview of what classical education is and gives the reader fair warning of the hard work involved in providing it in a homeschool setting in a way that challenges rather than discourages. This book can easily be read in an afternoon and includes a helpful but sufficiently brief "what to start reading" list. Those who are looking for something a bit more thorough may want to read Wilson's "Recovering the Lost Tools of Learning", though there his emphasis is on private Christian education rather than homeschool.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Caleb

    Great overview. Really appreciated their stress on imaginative literature and the imagination as foundational for so much of learning. They don't minimize the challenges, the need for parents to be students, etc. A little intimidated by how much these guys read and how quickly. They place a reading list at the end of the book and suggest that parents should read one book a week. How could anyone read Plato's Republic in a week and get anything out of it? Despite this unrealistic expectation, Clas Great overview. Really appreciated their stress on imaginative literature and the imagination as foundational for so much of learning. They don't minimize the challenges, the need for parents to be students, etc. A little intimidated by how much these guys read and how quickly. They place a reading list at the end of the book and suggest that parents should read one book a week. How could anyone read Plato's Republic in a week and get anything out of it? Despite this unrealistic expectation, Classical Education and the Homeschool is worth the read and only 66 pages.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Joonas Laajanen

    "The education of the children for God is the most important business done on earth. it is the one business for which all the earth exists. To it all politics, all war, all literature, all money-making, ought to be subordinated: and every parent especially ought to feel, every hour of the day, that next to making his own calling and election sure, this is the end for which he is kept alive by God-this is his task on earth." -R.L. Dabney

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