counter create hit The Phantom Prince: My Life with Ted Bundy - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Phantom Prince: My Life with Ted Bundy

Availability: Ready to download


Compare
Ads Banner

30 review for The Phantom Prince: My Life with Ted Bundy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nan

    I was 14 when I read this book. That's too young. My mom had a unique philosophy regarding censorship--so far as I remember, she didn't censor anything. I watched Holocaust movies when I was six. And I watched Mark Harmon portray Ted Bundy in The Deliberate Stranger on TV when I was just a kid. I was a freshman in high school, doing an overly ambitious research project on Ted Bundy. He had captured my imagination in the movie, and his recent execution left him lingering in my thoughts. As I was I was 14 when I read this book. That's too young. My mom had a unique philosophy regarding censorship--so far as I remember, she didn't censor anything. I watched Holocaust movies when I was six. And I watched Mark Harmon portray Ted Bundy in The Deliberate Stranger on TV when I was just a kid. I was a freshman in high school, doing an overly ambitious research project on Ted Bundy. He had captured my imagination in the movie, and his recent execution left him lingering in my thoughts. As I was researching, I wanted desperately to know--how could someone live with and love someone that was so patently evil? The answer is simple; it's easy to miss what you don't want to see. Kendall wrote this book with the benefit of hindsight. She was able to look back at their years-long relationship and see just how twisted and damaging it actually was. She was able to piece together odd occurrences and see them as signs of Bundy's monstrosity. At the time, though, he was her prince--the man who loved her. The small odd things weren't enough to force her to leave him in much the same way that people don't leave abusive partners. At first, it wasn't bad. Later, she didn't know what to do without him. He had become a habit in her unhappy life. It was only after he was accused of murder--and his coworker Carol seemed to be his second girlfriend--that Kendall was able to cut him out of her life. This is an important book in helping to understand the psychology of abused and dependent partners. It's too bad that it's out of print. The fact that I remember the book this well--19 years after reading it--should serve as testament to its power.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Johann (jobis89)

    Emotionally heavy and exhausting. But a very worthwhile read for true crime fans. Full review to come!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cbj

    When I first read Ann Rule's The Stranger Beside Me, I was intrigued by the fact that Ted Bundy was first reported to the police by his girlfriend Elizabeth Kendall. Kendall felt that the sketch put out by the police in the papers resembled her boyfriend . He also drove a Volkswagen, the car reported to be used by the killer according to people who might have seen him. But by then, the police had already checked Bundy out twice and ruled him out as the killer/kidnapper of the missing women. When I first read Ann Rule's The Stranger Beside Me, I was intrigued by the fact that Ted Bundy was first reported to the police by his girlfriend Elizabeth Kendall. Kendall felt that the sketch put out by the police in the papers resembled her boyfriend . He also drove a Volkswagen, the car reported to be used by the killer according to people who might have seen him. But by then, the police had already checked Bundy out twice and ruled him out as the killer/kidnapper of the missing women. Kendall continued to date Bundy after he was initially cleared, before reporting him again to the police. She even dated and stayed with him even after he was arrested and released on bail! The Phantom Prince: My Life with Ted Bundy is a painful and brutally honest account of Elizabeth Kendall's relationship with Ted Bundy during the early 1970s. I say brutally honest because Kendall is frank about her own inferiority complexes, dependent behavior, immaturity and above all, her alcoholism. She portrays herself as a naive, silly and overtly dependent person who turns to alcohol when the lying, manipulative and guiltless Bundy stands her up on many occasions after promising to marry her. She supports him throughout his failures as a law student and setbacks in his career. She probably did get paid to co-write the book. I am not sure about this. At the center of this book is an outwardly normal and promising American couple about to embark on the fulfillment of their dreams and get married. They even meet each other’s parents and friends. They have a great sex life. But the guy exhibits strange behavior at times - stealing, lying about his career prospects, indulging in hurtful behavior like not turning up on dates and going back on promises to get married that would make most women ditch him. But the girlfriend holds onto her man, hoping that he would reform eventually. And for a while it does seem like things would work out for them when he is accepted at law school. But it eventually turns out that the guy has a secret life, unbeknown to his woman, in which he goes around kidnapping, killing and raping beautiful young women. I cannot even begin to imagine the pressure this lady must have gone through when she first suspected Bundy of being the killer and her mental state when he was eventually arrested. The relationship scarred her beyond recovery. As she admits in the last few pages of the book: “On one level I find I have developed a grim view of human beings and what they are capable of doing to other human beings. That makes it hard for me to get very close to people.” There were many instances in the book when I found myself feeling really bad for this woman. I don’t know much about the milieu of 1970s America. But it seemed to be a time when people where moving out of their parent’s homes and living alone in other states and trying to face life on their own. Imagine a vulnerable girl on her own, without too many friends, running into someone like Ted Bundy. I don’t deny that I am intrigued and fascinated by Ted Bundy and his acts. I would read any book that would offer me clues about what drove Bundy to do what he did. That is the main reason why I read this book. But this book offers another point of view. It offers insight into why some weak women are attracted to manipulative, charismatic but eventually damaging personalities like Ted Bundy. Interestingly, Ted Bundy was in jail around the same time as Gary Gilmore. Norman Mailer wrote a towering true-life novel about Gilmore’s life, including his relationship with his girlfriend Nicole. I don’t think Mailer would have been interested in the middle-class milieu in which Bundy and Kendall met and moved around in. But he was certainly interested in psychopaths. Some great writer ought to have written a true-life novel about the relationship between Bundy and Kendall. It certainly deserves a better book than this one. Not that this is a bad book. It covers the procedural aspects of Kendall and her best friend’s initial suspicions about Bundy quite well, like their initial phone calls to the police and meetings with undercover policemen. They did not have mobile phones back in the 60s and the 70s. People who did not keep diaries kept track of the past through notes on the sides of their cheque leaves/books. That’s how Kendall tries to recollect the past when the police become interested in her allegations about her boyfriend. Like in Mailer’s The Executioner’s Song, The Phantom Prince also contains the letters and poems exchanged by the jailed killer and his girlfriend on the outside. Psychologists might never come to a conclusion about what drives psychopaths. Is it the genes? Upbringing? Modern life? But this book is not really about the psychopathic Ted Bundy. It is about a vulnerable, materialistic, needy and ultimately tragic person who wants a good square life for herself in the greatest country in the world. But the man she chooses as her gateway into the American dream is the most successful psychopath of the 20th century. At one point, she fears whether newspapers would dig out the fact that she reported her law student boyfriend as a possible killer when he ran for the post of governor after they were married!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Christina - Traveling Sister

    4, what a harrowing story, had to read it before her interview stars!! Full disclosure, this one was hard for me to read and to rate. What Kendall went through, especially in hind-sight and having to learn piece by piece the atrocities that Bundy committed is devastating to say the absolute least. However, Kendall isn't an author, she was just a woman who had a story to tell and a human being who had more trauma and emotion to sort through than most of us will ever have to face. They saw Ted 4, what a harrowing story, had to read it before her interview stars!! Full disclosure, this one was hard for me to read and to rate. What Kendall went through, especially in hind-sight and having to learn piece by piece the atrocities that Bundy committed is devastating to say the absolute least. However, Kendall isn't an author, she was just a woman who had a story to tell and a human being who had more trauma and emotion to sort through than most of us will ever have to face. They saw Ted Bundy as a murderer. I knew him as a lover and a friend. This book was originally written in 1988, by a version of Elizabeth Kendall that no longer exists. I don't know many people, if any, who would say they're the same person they were 5 years ago, let alone 20 or 30. I know how different I am, how much I've grown and changed through adult hood and I've had little trauma that compares to that of Kendall. This book felt a little bit like a tableau of a person who no longer exists and I found that absolutely fascinating. When you're reading the portions of this book that were written back in 1988 it's painfully clear that Kendall hadn't worked her way through the trauma, emotions or abuse that she had faced at the hands of Bundy. The Phantom Prince is a painful and heartbreaking look at a woman who was broken, only to put herself back together, alone, at the end of one of the most harrowing stories I've ever read. Kendall was incredibly honest with herself throughout the writing of this story. She is frank and open about her alcoholism, her dependency on a man she knew was no good, her immaturity and how that allowed her to be targeted and abused, her anxious attachment and the inferiority complex that kept her coming back to Bundy time and again despite his own abhorrent behavior. I see why people are obsessed with figuring him out. For years, I thought continually about how this same person I loved could do these cruel and violent things. Finally, I was able to let go. I took on this mantra: He’s crazy, and being sane, you will never understand crazy. Just give up. Live your life. You still have it. It’s a gift. I'm not going to go into a full synopsis of this book, because at it's heart, it really isn't about Ted Bundy, the lover or the boyfriend. It's about Elizabeth Kendall and her strength and resilience. It was an interesting insight into one of the most notorious murderers and monsters the world has ever seen. Straight through the eyes of his closest, most intimate victims. While the entirety of this book held my interest, I have to say the preface and the afterward were my absolute favorite. To read about Kendall's reflection on what she had written so shortly after Bundy's arrests and trials was absolutely inspired. In the end, this isn't necessarily about Ted Bundy, but the way that life, experience and love can heal a human being. It's Elizabeth Kendall's story of self-redemption and of finding her way back from the brink of absolute darkness.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ryn

    A quick addictive read. I got this out of print book in a PDF attached to a discussion thread in one of my murderinos groups on face book. As interested as I am in the psychology of everyone, it was extremely interesting peering into the mind of Ted Buddy’s long time girlfriend. I feel like I understand her. He sounds like he was your average avoidant manipulative asshole to her and she didn’t want to believe that he was truly a monster. He really was a frightening monster and a confusing one. A quick addictive read. I got this out of print book in a PDF attached to a discussion thread in one of my murderinos groups on face book. As interested as I am in the psychology of everyone, it was extremely interesting peering into the mind of Ted Buddy’s long time girlfriend. I feel like I understand her. He sounds like he was your average avoidant manipulative asshole to her and she didn’t want to believe that he was truly a monster. He really was a frightening monster and a confusing one. Makes you believe that some people may be born evil and there may be no way to mitigate that state. Here is a link to the PDF version that I read. I heard it is out of print and sells for 200$ on Amazon so I thought I would share the love. https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%... no idea if this link will work

  6. 5 out of 5

    Liz Pardue-schultz

    The only memoir I’ve read while constantly muttering “Oh hooneey..” to myself the entire ride.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Valerity (Val)

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This updated book I felt was very well done, given the wisdom of several decades to reflect, and to help improve Liz's harsh feelings about herself at the time. I was shocked at how much I'd forgotten of the original story. I'm still absorbing it, I suppose. The part written by the daughter, Molly, was enlightening and heartbreaking all at once. But she seems to have made peace with the past fairly well. I would recommend for any true crime fan, especially for any that are interested in Ted This updated book I felt was very well done, given the wisdom of several decades to reflect, and to help improve Liz's harsh feelings about herself at the time. I was shocked at how much I'd forgotten of the original story. I'm still absorbing it, I suppose. The part written by the daughter, Molly, was enlightening and heartbreaking all at once. But she seems to have made peace with the past fairly well. I would recommend for any true crime fan, especially for any that are interested in Ted Bundy, one of the better known serial killers with many books written about him, even long after his execution. There are also many never seen before pictures in the book of Bundy and the author and others. Published on my WordPress blog, seen here: https://wordpress.com/post/bookblog20...

  8. 4 out of 5

    JG Wagner

    I found this book at my parents used book store in a pile of books they found at a yard sale. I read through it in a weekend. This book is super creepy. If you want a book that you can't put down and will scare you to death for the next ten years, then read this.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    Thin, but fascinating! This and Ann Rule's book are the best two about Bundy of all of them. Good luck finding this one. My hubby bought it off ebay for entirely too much.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ines

    I adored this book. I'm probably one of the few people who thinks Ted Bundy's interview with James Dobson and his salvation were genuine and that he really did hate what he had done. Too many books and documentaries about Bundy focus on the awful things he did (as they should), but they never attempt to show his human side. This book does exactly that. It shows that Ted Bundy was not a monster, but a man who somehow got lost along the way and started doing the most terrible things. I love that I adored this book. I'm probably one of the few people who thinks Ted Bundy's interview with James Dobson and his salvation were genuine and that he really did hate what he had done. Too many books and documentaries about Bundy focus on the awful things he did (as they should), but they never attempt to show his human side. This book does exactly that. It shows that Ted Bundy was not a monster, but a man who somehow got lost along the way and started doing the most terrible things. I love that the author got so candid about her daily life with Ted and showed not only his strengths and shortcomings, but also her own. I admire the fact that she was not portraying herself as an innocent victim in it all, but showed that both of them contributed to the toxic nature of their relationship. Don't be fooled - Liz makes no excuses for any of his behaviour, from stealing to infidelity and eventually, murder. She shows us however how much we are willing to overlook and write off when we love someone. It was utterly fascinating to read about how normal and sweet someone like Ted Bundy could be to a person he cared for. In parts, it shows his desperation in dealing with what he was doing and even his admissions of guilt and truthful confessions of his crimes to Liz, which he later denied in court and to the media for almost a decade. If you want a book that you can't put down which shows you Ted Bundy the human being, this is it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cassie

    Christ alive. That was rough. God, I just can't get over the last few lines in the book. The realization that Kimberly Leach was only 12 years old, the same age as Elizabeth's own daughter at the time, and how Bundy's assurances that she and her daughter were safe from him were an outright lie. Or his admittance to either considering or outright trying to kill her on multiple occasions. Or the last few lines of that final letter he sent her, threatening her and everyone she loved had the Christ alive. That was rough. God, I just can't get over the last few lines in the book. The realization that Kimberly Leach was only 12 years old, the same age as Elizabeth's own daughter at the time, and how Bundy's assurances that she and her daughter were safe from him were an outright lie. Or his admittance to either considering or outright trying to kill her on multiple occasions. Or the last few lines of that final letter he sent her, threatening her and everyone she loved had the information she had given to the police turned out to be the reason for his predicament. This poor, poor girl. I can't believe how much Bundy preyed on her insecurities. Of course, that sounds incredibly stupid given the fact that he is a whole ass serial killer, but just...Jesus. I find it incredibly disconcerting how easy it could be to fall for that act. And any woman who has felt the pressures and insecurities that society thrusts upon us weighing her down will understand the fear that comes with the realization that you very well could have been another one of his victims. Because, no matter how you look at it, Liz was one of Ted Bundy's victims—just one of the few to survive him.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jewel

    This book is extremely disturbing. I don't know how to talk about it, I don't know how to review it, and I don't want to think about it. All I can say is that Elizabeth is a hero. I don't judge her for any of the ways she reacted in this retelling of her life. I know if I found out somebody I loved was a brutal serial killer, I'd be destroyed and traumatized for life. That she managed to move on, raise her daughter and find love again is a testament to how strong she is as a woman. It seems very This book is extremely disturbing. I don't know how to talk about it, I don't know how to review it, and I don't want to think about it. All I can say is that Elizabeth is a hero. I don't judge her for any of the ways she reacted in this retelling of her life. I know if I found out somebody I loved was a brutal serial killer, I'd be destroyed and traumatized for life. That she managed to move on, raise her daughter and find love again is a testament to how strong she is as a woman. It seems very obvious to me that Ted was preying on her and manipulating her because he knew she was a loving and overly empathetic woman, but I can understand her confusion. She loved him, and then she found out that the man she loved didn't exist. I understand why she hung on to him for so long, even after he was sent to prison. I mean, how can you accept that someone you've spent years with did something so horrible? Again. She's amazing for surviving. Five stars for the fantastic writing. (but for the record I'm probably going to get rid of this book. I don't think I ever want to look at it again)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alana Voth

    Here's a must read for those interested in learning what sort of boyfriend/lover Ted Bundy was as revealed by his former girlfriend of seven years, Elizabeth Kendall, who was a single mom struggling to make ends meet in the late sixties and early seventies. Right away, Elizabeth refers to herself as a "failure" following her divorce. She leaves Utah for Washington in hopes of a new start for herself and her young daughter, Tina. Once settled in Seattle, Elizabeth admits her loneliness and Here's a must read for those interested in learning what sort of boyfriend/lover Ted Bundy was as revealed by his former girlfriend of seven years, Elizabeth Kendall, who was a single mom struggling to make ends meet in the late sixties and early seventies. Right away, Elizabeth refers to herself as a "failure" following her divorce. She leaves Utah for Washington in hopes of a new start for herself and her young daughter, Tina. Once settled in Seattle, Elizabeth admits her loneliness and throughout the book, like so many young women, continues to berate herself as ugly and stupid and so on. Heartbreaking and familiar. Enter Ted Bundy, handsome, intelligent, ambitious, attentive, sweet, charming, great with kids, and loves to cook. He's also the bomb in the sack, or so the author implies, although she's not forthcoming with details. Too bad. Yeah, I said it. Kendall had a sexual relationship with America's most notorious serial sex killer. I want details. Oh, well. The main thing is, Ted Bundy came off a Prince Charming, and if Kendall were writing a romance novel . . . well, she wasn't. Prince Bundy was an illusion he fought hard to maintain even as he succumbed to his dark impulses and murdered young and beautiful women all over the country. Poor Elizabeth Kendall. I mean that. Imagine you're in an emotionally abusive relationship then add finding out he's a serial killer. Yeah. He would have snowed me, too. That is what is so powerful about Kendall's story. I relate to her. That's what makes Ted Bundy so scary. I would have fallen for him, too. How emotionally and physically exhausting to try and keep up with Ted's infinite manipulations. He turned on the crocodile tears and overwrought sentiments of love over and over and over again. What a mind fuck. How painful. Did Ted love Elizabeth? Probably not. I'm pretty sure Ted didn't experience emotions the way most of us experience emotions. I'm also pretty sure he wished he experienced emotions the way most of us do but was unable to because of wiring and biology. Ted admits to Elizabeth during a phone call from jail she was a touchstone for him, a reality check, the way in which he tried to feel and appear "normal." One of the most powerful moments in Elizabeth Kendall's story happens when she drives to the mall where Ted attempted to abduct Carol DaRonch, the one who got away. Kendall asks herself if a handsome and well mannered stranger (Ted) approached her and said he was a police officer and asked her to come with him, would she? Her answer is probably, yes. Me, too. Especially in 1974. I wouldn't have seen him coming. That trick with the cast on his leg would have worked wonders on me. Here comes this handsome, wounded man asking for help then chatting me up. Yup. There's me walking to his car and carrying his books for him. Jesus. XO.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Julie Belcher

    I'm surprised this book got so many good reviews. Personally I was disappointed. It gives you another perspective on the many faces of Theodore Bundy but it ended up being more like diary entries from a 14 year old girl. Why won't he love me? Why won't he marry me? Why am I so miserable? Why is he so distant? I wanted to hear facts and stories of her time with Ted but instead all I heard was her damsel in distress act.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Attack Salmon

    Well ... at the end of the day I am like Elizabeth . I can't concide the image of Bundy killing women to the Bundy in here. He is too normal and too caring. I don't know what make this not as fascinating as A Father's Story. Could it be the writing? But it could be also that Bundy is too good of an actor. He is freaking good at hiding his true nature and put on a facade of the All American golden boy. With Dahmer, he shows unusual behaviour and characteristics that we can pinpoint, things like Well ... at the end of the day I am like Elizabeth . I can't concide the image of Bundy killing women to the Bundy in here. He is too normal and too caring. I don't know what make this not as fascinating as A Father's Story. Could it be the writing? But it could be also that Bundy is too good of an actor. He is freaking good at hiding his true nature and put on a facade of the All American golden boy. With Dahmer, he shows unusual behaviour and characteristics that we can pinpoint, things like antisocial behaviour and lack of interest in almost everything. But Bundy would have u fool. Thats how good he is. I think I even like him a little. He treat Elizabeth real nice albeit they have some up and downs. I can see that he love Elizabeth a lot but I couldn't understand why he wouldn't marry her but go for Carole Anne Boon instead. I don't know what to think of this. It read like Bundy is not the killer but being frame because of how much love he show Elizabeth. How can someone who kill so many women still being able to profess love for another woman?

  16. 5 out of 5

    Stacy Fetters

    What a frightening tale to tell. Can't even imagine the horror she went through not knowing who she was actually seeing. With each page came unbelievable truths of living/dating a serial murderer. What really got me was that even after she knew what he was up too, she didn't leave him and kept crawling back to him. Quite astonishing. Why has this book never been republished? It took me forever to get my hands on this book and I'm glad I did. One I need to have in my own collection of macabre.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Hilary

    makes me want to quit drinking

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rosie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I went into this book fully expecting to enjoy it (as much as anyone can, given the topic) and it lived up to my expectations. In November last year I read The Stranger Beside Me, which I'm now glad I did. I'm also glad I read it before I read this. Personal Preference, I guess. Because, where Ann Rule gives us the facts and the 'real' view of Ted Bundy the serial killer, Elizabeth Kendall gives us her rose-tinted view of him. I can see why Kendall was so taken in by him and how, despite her I went into this book fully expecting to enjoy it (as much as anyone can, given the topic) and it lived up to my expectations. In November last year I read The Stranger Beside Me, which I'm now glad I did. I'm also glad I read it before I read this. Personal Preference, I guess. Because, where Ann Rule gives us the facts and the 'real' view of Ted Bundy the serial killer, Elizabeth Kendall gives us her rose-tinted view of him. I can see why Kendall was so taken in by him and how, despite her doubts, she still didn't know about this other side to him until later on. I enjoyed this perspective for one main reason: it's a known fact he was charming but Ann Rule telling me that very matter-of-factly, didn't have the same impact as Elizabeth Kendall detailing that side of him. The Phantom Prince really gets that across in a way that The Stranger Beside Me didn't. I'm glad that The Phantom Prince doesn't focus on Bundy's body count. That really would've taken away from what Kendall was trying to convey. In addition to this, the book concluded with Molly Kendall's story, which gave some quite disturbing insight into the side of Ted Bundy that came out with her while Elizabeth wasn't around. I definitely got a bit giddy when Ann Rule was mentioned too 🤗 In my opinion, The Phantom Prince is the perfect companion to The Stranger Beside Me. I'd definitely recommend both!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah

    Most of my time was spent getting frustrated with the narrator and her sympathy for a serial killer. It had a very 'woe is me' vibe that got awfully tiring. Regardless, learning more about true crime is always a plus for me.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Linds

    This book is out of print and I needed an interlibrary loan to get my hands on a copy. It is an account of Ted Bundy from his girlfriend/fiancé of five years. Liz is a 25 year old divorcee and Mother of a young daughter. She meets Ted, a charming law student, falls in love, and thinks she’s on track towards a marriage and a nice life. Unfortunately lies, thefts, and evidence of other woman hurt her (though surprisingly no violence). When descriptions of a murderer named Ted that fit her Ted start This book is out of print and I needed an interlibrary loan to get my hands on a copy. It is an account of Ted Bundy from his girlfriend/fiancé of five years. Liz is a 25 year old divorcee and Mother of a young daughter. She meets Ted, a charming law student, falls in love, and thinks she’s on track towards a marriage and a nice life. Unfortunately lies, thefts, and evidence of other woman hurt her (though surprisingly no violence). When descriptions of a murderer named Ted that fit her Ted start filling the newspapers, she calls in to tip the police even though she doesn’t think it’s him. Ted is arrested and Liz stands by his side as long as there is some hope he could be innocent. Liz is not really self aware or insightful enough to explain why she does this despite massive amounts of circumstantial evidence pointing to Ted. This is also before people really knew what sociopaths were and how they operated, and you can see her confusion at the gross mismatch between his words and actions. It is only after Ted’s confession after the Florida sorority murders that she is able to finally accept that her lover is an evil killer. I’m left with feelings of pity and contempt for Liz (more of the former than the latter) as it shows an extreme case of how far people can be deluded in their denial. The Stranger Beside Me by Ann Rule is a much better account of Ted Bundy but if one is interested in the case this is worth reading. It is a primary source though it lacks insight.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mandi Bean

    I can't remember the last time I read a book in two days. The honesty of the author's account of her life with Ted Bundy is remarkable. Kendall freely admits her own shortcomings which may have attracted Ted to her in the first place. She does not deny any facet of her relationship with Ted and while some readers have found her to be irritating in her inconsistencies, I felt it made her human and actually gave her credibility. Unfortunately, now having read the source material for the wildly I can't remember the last time I read a book in two days. The honesty of the author's account of her life with Ted Bundy is remarkable. Kendall freely admits her own shortcomings which may have attracted Ted to her in the first place. She does not deny any facet of her relationship with Ted and while some readers have found her to be irritating in her inconsistencies, I felt it made her human and actually gave her credibility. Unfortunately, now having read the source material for the wildly popular Netflix film starring Zac Efron, I dislike the film as they weren't true to the material.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Scar Young

    Liz was also a victim to Ted Bundy. I hope one day her story gets published again, because it deserves to be heard.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    "I understood perfectly well what the power of fear could do to a person." I've been dying to read The Phantom Prince for years, and I'm so happy that it was finally re-released. This was an intense and unsettling read, and I highly recommend picking it up if you're interested in a unique perspective on Ted Bundy. The Phantom Prince is haunting because it really shows how normal he appeared to be (even more so than The Stranger Beside Me, in my opinion, because Ted and Liz were romantically "I understood perfectly well what the power of fear could do to a person." I've been dying to read The Phantom Prince for years, and I'm so happy that it was finally re-released. This was an intense and unsettling read, and I highly recommend picking it up if you're interested in a unique perspective on Ted Bundy. The Phantom Prince is haunting because it really shows how normal he appeared to be (even more so than The Stranger Beside Me, in my opinion, because Ted and Liz were romantically involved). It's difficult to read from the perspective of someone trapped in an emotionally abusive relationship, and I appreciate Liz's openness and honesty. He deceived everyone he met, and she's had to live with the guilt and lasting effects. I like that I was able to read this version because they maintained the accuracy of the original, but Liz was able to write an afterword many years distanced from what happened. She's also changed a lot from the person who wrote this book (she felt that she was still in love with him at the time, and that's no longer the case). Liz's daughter Molly tells her story for the first time, and that was disturbing and heartbreaking to read. So many people were his victims in different ways. This is definitely not a light read, but it's an intriguing one, and I am grateful that Liz & Molly shared their stories. CW - addiction, abuse, pedophilia

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Liz's writing is very compelling. I've read this book within hours. I enjoyed the transcriptions from Ted's letters to Liz the most. Very interesting read from a viewpoint of someone so close to a serial killer. Disturbing, although lacking most details of the vile acts.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Candace

    When I recently learned that Liz had written a book about her life with Ted Bundy, I knew I had to track down this book. The Phantom Prince is a well-written, engrossing book that details how she met Ted, their rocky relationship, the anxiety, obsession, and self-doubt she faced as she suspected his involvement in the crimes, and their contact following his arrest and imprisonment. For those interested in the Ted Bundy case, this book will offer you a very unique perspective. I highly recommend When I recently learned that Liz had written a book about her life with Ted Bundy, I knew I had to track down this book. The Phantom Prince is a well-written, engrossing book that details how she met Ted, their rocky relationship, the anxiety, obsession, and self-doubt she faced as she suspected his involvement in the crimes, and their contact following his arrest and imprisonment. For those interested in the Ted Bundy case, this book will offer you a very unique perspective. I highly recommend this book!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Laurel

    The Phantom Prince is one of the most brutally candid memoirs I've ever read. Elizabeth Kendall is extremely frank about her personality traits which left her so vulnerable to Bundy's extremely skilful manipulation. She has no illusions about her dependent personality, her poor self-esteem, or her alcoholism. It was heartbreaking to hear her relate his taking a woman already vulnerable and gaslighting her masterfully. I hope wherever she is today, almost thirty years after his execution, that The Phantom Prince is one of the most brutally candid memoirs I've ever read. Elizabeth Kendall is extremely frank about her personality traits which left her so vulnerable to Bundy's extremely skilful manipulation. She has no illusions about her dependent personality, her poor self-esteem, or her alcoholism. It was heartbreaking to hear her relate his taking a woman already vulnerable and gaslighting her masterfully. I hope wherever she is today, almost thirty years after his execution, that she's feeling more secure.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Peyton

    “He loves life and enjoyed it to the fullest. The tragedy is that this warm and loving man is driven to kill.” This is just one of the most interesting serial killers I’ve ever read about. It baffles me to read about someone with an obvious severe case of personality disorder. How someone can flip a switch so easy it makes you wonder if he had a disorder at all. He could seem so normal and keep it together so easily or so it seemed. Wow is all I can say at this point.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Fishface

    A very good, enlightening read about the Bundy murders from the POV of his ex-fiancee. I never realized what a strong role she had in the investigation, the court proceedings, all of it. I now feel I was misled by the other books I've read on this subject.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    For those of you who know me, you are all aware that I have an almost sick fascination with serial killers and true crime in general, for the rest of you, now you know. I was searching for this book almost manically. It isn’t available in any of the libraries in my area and it is out of print everywhere online. It currently sells on ebay for $2000. Yes, it is that precious and people are now looking for it more than ever, all because of the recent Ted Bundy movie, Extremely Wicked Shockingly For those of you who know me, you are all aware that I have an almost sick fascination with serial killers and true crime in general, for the rest of you, now you know. I was searching for this book almost manically. It isn’t available in any of the libraries in my area and it is out of print everywhere online. It currently sells on ebay for $2000. Yes, it is that precious and people are now looking for it more than ever, all because of the recent Ted Bundy movie, Extremely Wicked Shockingly Evil and Vile. I found this book by accident on Reddit as I was browsing on the app. There was this guy who posted the link from his google drive account. I was ecstatic. I don't know where he found it but the book is all scanned and in perfect image quality. Now, why this book is so wanted and popular: Elizabeth Kendall was Ted Bundy’s former girlfriend. They were in a relationship from 1969 up until 1976. This book is her memoir. While reading her story, I came to like Bundy as he first appeared to Kendall. He was kind, loving, caring, a real sweetheart if you will. He was amazing with her and with her daughter, helping Kendall around the house, cooking romantic dinners and even dropping her to work and her daughter to daycare. He was all a woman would want from a man. Kendall on the other side, had just gotten out of a divorce, which wasn’t a good thing back then, had her own insecurities and came from a conservative family. She was careful about who she went out with, her daughter was her priority and moving to Seattle, despite the difficulties, she went by. It wasn;t long before she fell deeply in love with him. I mean who wouldn’t? They didn’t live together, as Bundy kept his room in the University District but most nights he would spent the nights at her apartment. Thinking about it, Bundy really helped her find a better apartment, praised her achievements at work and supported her emotionally but it was he who needed financial support as he was a University student. Kendall even though she proved to be really clever and had the ability to put 2 and 2 together, she was really blinded in the beginning. A lot of reviews on Goodreads criticize her that she was plain stupid and that she didn't use her eyes to see the situation she was getting in, but it is extremely difficult to see through the work of a psychopath, especially when the person involved is infatuated with said psychopath. Bundy changed his behavior abruptly. From faithful to Kendall, he suddenly wanted to see other women as well but he would become very angry if Kendall wanted to do date other men. He never really lost his temper, he was always calm which was really scary. Then 2 girls disappeared at Lake Sammamish. Bundy changed completely. He didn't come over as often as before, he was agitated and cried more than before. Yes, he cries quite a lot in the book, which could be interpreted as seeking his victim’s pity. I noticed the pattern of crying, whenever he wanted to avoid a question or a situation. Bundy was cunning. Kendall on the other side was hooked on him. Despite him being a kleptomaniac and blaming this behavior on his poor family (he was embarrassed his family was middle class), he started having multiple relationships with other women in other states. Kendall found out about this but she still couldn't leave him. He had such a tight grip on her. Sweet words and poems and romance was what he was serving her whenever she threatened him with a break up. She was becoming obsessed with him, with the idea of spending the rest of her life with him. Kendall was clever though. As the suspect description hit the news, she started questioning herself about Bundy’s whereabouts on the day of the disappearances, she looked at the similarities between Bundy and the suspect description on the newspapers. She called the police, she went through his things. All the time doubting even her own self about it, thinking she has lost her mind and how could a nice guy like do things like that. She was embarrassed that she thought of it. Then things started going south when she got into contact with the police. She was an emotional wreck. She couldn’t believe what the police investigators told her but at the same time she kept seeing him and giving him the benefit of the doubt because he was confessing how much he loved her and how he couldn’t live without her, that he wanted to be with her forever and he would never love another woman. It was only her for him, no one else, even though he avoided getting married to her. Kendall was going crazy and at the same time she turned to alcohol to ease her pain and erase her constant thoughts. I don’t find her weak or stupid at all, unlike some other people. This is how psychopaths work. This is what they do. They make you depend on them by encouraging you, by supporting you and when you try to get away, the say that you are paranoid, that you have flaws, that you are overreacting. They make you question your own existence. The have a way of making you addicted to them. Ted Bundy has been dead for the last 30 years, yet there are girls out there that have no idea who he is and what he has done. There are fewer people out there that know about his deadly charm and crazy mind games. Psychopaths, killers and other offenders don’t appear with red eyes and sharp teeth in the dark. They are everyday people, like you and me. They work silently, they drive you crazy, they make you believe that all of your suspicions are just stupid games your anxiety plays with you. They elevate themselves by shoving you down to the ground. This memoir, this story its a reminder that it can happen to anyone. As Kendall went back and forth with herself about whether or not Bundy was the killer, so many women have done the same about their partners cheating, hiding money, sexually abusing others etc. Psychopathy and manipulation is something most of us are capable of and unfortunately, people are using it. I feel that this story should be read by everyone out there but especially women. It is a strong lesson that when intuition, when your gut tells you that something is wrong, it usually is. It is a chilling story of a woman who faced evil in the eye and survived, scarred but she did survive.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Caidyn (SEMI-HIATUS; BW Reviews; he/him/his)

    A lot of this information was stuff I knew. I've read a lot about Ted Bundy because he was a killer I was fascinated with for a long time. Honestly, I still am. I watched the Zac Efron movie and it was great. I watched and read Confessions of a Killer. I watched the new Prime documentary that's based on this book. So, I knew a lot of the information that Kendall wrote about. I just really liked reading it in her own words rather than an interpretation that's colored by someone else's biases. I A lot of this information was stuff I knew. I've read a lot about Ted Bundy because he was a killer I was fascinated with for a long time. Honestly, I still am. I watched the Zac Efron movie and it was great. I watched and read Confessions of a Killer. I watched the new Prime documentary that's based on this book. So, I knew a lot of the information that Kendall wrote about. I just really liked reading it in her own words rather than an interpretation that's colored by someone else's biases. I also loved reading Molly's chapter about her reflecting on her relationship with Ted Bundy as he was a father figure, but also physically and sexually abusive. All in all, definitely a book I'll want on my shelf for my collection.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.