counter create hit New Rules for the New Economy - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

New Rules for the New Economy

Availability: Ready to download

The classic book on business strategy in the new networked economy-- from the author of the New York Times bestseller The Inevitable Forget supply and demand. Forget computers. The old rules are broken. Today, communication, not computation, drives change. We are rushing into a world where connectivity is everything, and where old business know-how means nothing. In this The classic book on business strategy in the new networked economy-- from the author of the New York Times bestseller The Inevitable Forget supply and demand. Forget computers. The old rules are broken. Today, communication, not computation, drives change. We are rushing into a world where connectivity is everything, and where old business know-how means nothing. In this new economic order, success flows primarily from understanding networks, and networks have their own rules. In New Rules for the New Economy, Kelly presents ten fundamental principles of the connected economy that invert the traditional wisdom of the industrial world. Succinct and memorable, New Rules explains why these powerful laws are already hardwired into the new economy, and how they play out in all kinds of business--both low and high tech-- all over the world. More than an overview of new economic principles, it prescribes clear and specific strategies for success in the network economy. For any worker, CEO, or middle manager, New Rules is the survival kit for the new economy.


Compare
Ads Banner

The classic book on business strategy in the new networked economy-- from the author of the New York Times bestseller The Inevitable Forget supply and demand. Forget computers. The old rules are broken. Today, communication, not computation, drives change. We are rushing into a world where connectivity is everything, and where old business know-how means nothing. In this The classic book on business strategy in the new networked economy-- from the author of the New York Times bestseller The Inevitable Forget supply and demand. Forget computers. The old rules are broken. Today, communication, not computation, drives change. We are rushing into a world where connectivity is everything, and where old business know-how means nothing. In this new economic order, success flows primarily from understanding networks, and networks have their own rules. In New Rules for the New Economy, Kelly presents ten fundamental principles of the connected economy that invert the traditional wisdom of the industrial world. Succinct and memorable, New Rules explains why these powerful laws are already hardwired into the new economy, and how they play out in all kinds of business--both low and high tech-- all over the world. More than an overview of new economic principles, it prescribes clear and specific strategies for success in the network economy. For any worker, CEO, or middle manager, New Rules is the survival kit for the new economy.

30 review for New Rules for the New Economy

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ben Kester

    This is a prescient book for 1998. Much of Kelly's vision is now a reality. It's a tribute to Kelly. I'd like to see if he is still writing. Most of his ideas have become commonplace, so I'd be hesitant to recommend this read. My takeaway is Let Go At The Top. If you're climbing mountains, sometimes you must descend a smaller peak before climbing a bigger one.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Older book about the increasing digitization of the world. Not even really related to the internet. Short and sweet. One cool idea I had was: How does someone who has been down a dead end path tell someone on that same path where they are and where they are going? How can you convince them without their seeing it for themselves? Quotes: "The key premise of this book is that the principles governing the wold of the soft - the world of intangibles, of media, of software, and of services - will soon Older book about the increasing digitization of the world. Not even really related to the internet. Short and sweet. One cool idea I had was: How does someone who has been down a dead end path tell someone on that same path where they are and where they are going? How can you convince them without their seeing it for themselves? Quotes: "The key premise of this book is that the principles governing the wold of the soft - the world of intangibles, of media, of software, and of services - will soon command the world of the hard - the world of reality, or atoms, of objects, of steel and oil, and the hard work done by the sweat of brows." "Communication is the economy." "We know the industrial revolution succeeded because we can no longer see its soldiers, the motors." "The value of a network explodes as its membership increases, and then the value explosion sucks in yet more members, compounding the result." "Are network superwinners in fact monopolies? They are not like any monopolies of the industrial age." "The great innovation of Silicon Valley is not the wowie-zowie hardware and software it has invented. Silicon Valley's greatest "product" is the social organization of its companies and, most important, the networked architecture of the region itself - the tangled web of former jobs, intimate colleagues, information leakage from one firm to the next, rapid company life cycles, and agile email culture." "Drucker's Rule - they must be ten times better than what they hope to displace." "In the network economy a firm's primary focus shifts from maximizing the firm's value to maximizing the network's value." "Eventually technical standards will become as important as laws." "Relationships are more powerful than technical quality." "But you have to descend and risk extinction in order to have the opportunity to rise again." "It is so cheap to complete a transaction from almost anywhere, anytime, that tiny slivers of value, built upon microcosts of transactions, can be surgically inserted into all manner of processes and products. Because each microvalue sliver is so cheap, there is economic room for multiple microvalue slivers where before there was only room for one intermediary. As transaction costs plummet to the nanopenny level, some little crumb of value can be profitably added to more and more processes." "Network technology increases the size of the largest firms yet makes it more possible to have smaller firms while also increasing the number of midsized firms." "In its place: a world of demassified niches. Niche production, niche consumption, niche diversion, niche education. Niche world...Instead of the mass technology of broadcast TV, we now have net-centric alternatives." "Firms such as Amazon should be viewed as primarily selling intangible relationships. "Amazon should not be compared to actual stores selling books. Rather...the value that Amazon adds is in the reviews, the recommendations, the advice, the information about new and upcoming releases, the user interface, the community interest around certain subjects. Yes, Amazon will arrange to deliver the book to your door, but you as a customer are really paying them for the information that led you to your purchase." "The problem with trying to measure productivity is that it measures only how well people can do the wrong jobs. Any job that can be measured for productivity probably should be eliminated from the list of jobs that people do...the question for each worker is not "How do I do this job right?" but "What is the right job to do?""

  3. 5 out of 5

    RevFile News

    KEVIN KELLY was Executive Editor for Wired magazine in 1998 when he wrote this book. What he wrote then is coming to pass today with the advent of the RFID chip technology, the so-called "Internet of Things," and much more. In Chapter 1, "This New Economy," he speaks of "an emerging new economic order," a "new highly technical planetary economy" that was on the horizon. "This new economy has three distinguishing characteristics," he writes. "It is global. It favors intangible things -- ideas, KEVIN KELLY was Executive Editor for Wired magazine in 1998 when he wrote this book. What he wrote then is coming to pass today with the advent of the RFID chip technology, the so-called "Internet of Things," and much more. In Chapter 1, "This New Economy," he speaks of "an emerging new economic order," a "new highly technical planetary economy" that was on the horizon. "This new economy has three distinguishing characteristics," he writes. "It is global. It favors intangible things -- ideas, information, and relationships. And it is intensely interlinked. These three attributes produce a new type of marketplace and society, one that is rooted in ubiquitous electronic networks." Now, what this all means long-term is where we are today with the 2011 release of the IPv6 Internet Protocol, in which "every atom on earth will have its own unique web address," it has been said. Concurrently, Kelly writes: "What this means is that chips are becoming cheap and tiny enough to slip into every object we make. Eventually, every can of soup will have a chip on its lid. Every light switch will contain a chip. Every book will have a chip in it spine. Every shirt will have at least one chip sewn into its hem. Every item on a grocery shelf will have stuck to it, or embedded within itself, a button of silicon. The day will come when every item will ... contain a tiny sliver of embedded thought."

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bibhu Ashish

    “Network will drive the new economy” is what Kevin Kelly has tried to emphasize in this title. Whether it is a network of dumb things or a network of human beings.Organizations which will understand the intricacies of network and invest in it will survive in the world where everything is in a flux and nothing is constant .Ten profound rules which are going to revolutionize the way business will be done in the twenty first century are well cited in the book which I have documented in my blog. Read “Network will drive the new economy” is what Kevin Kelly has tried to emphasize in this title. Whether it is a network of dumb things or a network of human beings.Organizations which will understand the intricacies of network and invest in it will survive in the world where everything is in a flux and nothing is constant .Ten profound rules which are going to revolutionize the way business will be done in the twenty first century are well cited in the book which I have documented in my blog. Read here

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rusty

    I feel like I just stepped out of the indutrial age into the info age. Great read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Aaron donsky

    This a must read and game-changer

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ralph Zoontjens

    Contains some good insights pertaining to the revolution that the world is currently undergoing.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Heather Dombrovskis

    Kevin Kelly does a superb job at explaining how to adapt to the coming changes with technology disrupting the economy, he show how in the Information Age the value of relationships and trust is more important then ever because so much information out there and so many options. Kelly discusses how when one opportunity is lost other opportunities are created also when one new technology or niche is created others open up. The other idea is why solve problems when you could simply seek new Kevin Kelly does a superb job at explaining how to adapt to the coming changes with technology disrupting the economy, he show how in the Information Age the value of relationships and trust is more important then ever because so much information out there and so many options. Kelly discusses how when one opportunity is lost other opportunities are created also when one new technology or niche is created others open up. The other idea is why solve problems when you could simply seek new opportunities.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ties

    Amazing how spot on this book was and how extremely relevant it still is. The current examples in the book are outdated now but it's easy to see how the principles is now. It is now mostly and overview of the world with only a few predictions still panning out but I think Kelly goes 10/10 in this book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ganesh Subramanian

    AN outstanding book. Considering that this was written 20 years back, the various points and the reasoning put forward is unbelievable. It is more like Seeing the future today". Everything in the book is happening today and at an even more furious pace. This is one of the books that can be read over and over again and you will begin to understand what is happening in today's world better

  11. 5 out of 5

    Marko

    I have the english edition: New rukes for the bew economy and the german edition: NetEconomy

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brad Revell

    My review is here: https://www.bradrevell.com/2019/11/ne... Three key takeaways from the book: 1. If you want to envision where the future of your industry will be, imagine it as a business built entirely around the soft, even if at this point you see it based in the hard. 2. Communication — which in the end is what the digital technology and media are all about — is not just a sector of the economy. Communication is the economy. 3. In the new order, innovation is more important than price because My review is here: https://www.bradrevell.com/2019/11/ne... Three key takeaways from the book: 1. If you want to envision where the future of your industry will be, imagine it as a business built entirely around the soft, even if at this point you see it based in the hard. 2. Communication — which in the end is what the digital technology and media are all about — is not just a sector of the economy. Communication is the economy. 3. In the new order, innovation is more important than price because price is a derivative of innovation.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tobi Lawson

    Classic Kevin Kelly. Great synthesization of the fundamental thoughts about networks and economies.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Gianfranco Ruffini

    2006.a.continua quanto già letto

  15. 4 out of 5

    Josh Allred

    Still relevant information for today's world.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Harv Griffin

    This book, copyright 1998, is the most marked-up and underlined book in my library. I probably re-read it twice a year, trying to push myself in favorable directions. Written pre-Google (well, pre-Google-IPO, anyway) it is the best collection of strategic approaches to technology I've read. @hg47

  17. 4 out of 5

    Maxim

    This has potential to be studied as a typical "dot com" era opus on the great new world that was lying ahead of us. As all books of it's kind, it is rich in far fetching generalizations and thin on great ideas.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lori Grant

    An optional-read book on managing technology strategy for managers, executives, and entrepreneurs.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tom Peterson

    Time and time again, I come back to this book and think...wow, Had I only started and listened to what he said in this book. Such a forward thinking and revelatory read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ty Roper

    Book is obviously dated, but it is interesting to look back at his perspective on the future, now that it is the future.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    Good insights on Healthcare issues.

  22. 4 out of 5

    George

    A reference book since I first bought it long ago.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nick Woodall

    Interesting read, but I think he got a few of them wrong.

  24. 5 out of 5

    SHIN JAE YONG

  25. 4 out of 5

    RJ Stayton

  26. 5 out of 5

    Paul Vittay

  27. 5 out of 5

    Bart-Jan

  28. 5 out of 5

    Juan Ignacio Gelos

  29. 4 out of 5

    Prakas Patra

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ankit Sharma

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.