counter create hit The Forgotten Kingdom - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The Forgotten Kingdom

Availability: Ready to download

The story continues in The Forgotten Kingdom, the second book in the astonishing Lost Queen trilogy, already hailed as “Outlander meets Camelot” (Kirsty Logan) and “The Mists of Avalon for a new generation” (Linnea Hartsuyker). AD 573. Imprisoned in her chamber, Languoreth awaits news in torment. Her husband and son have ridden off to wage war against her brother, Lailoken. The story continues in The Forgotten Kingdom, the second book in the astonishing Lost Queen trilogy, already hailed as “Outlander meets Camelot” (Kirsty Logan) and “The Mists of Avalon for a new generation” (Linnea Hartsuyker). AD 573. Imprisoned in her chamber, Languoreth awaits news in torment. Her husband and son have ridden off to wage war against her brother, Lailoken. She doesn’t yet know that her young daughter, Angharad, who was training with Lailoken to become a Wisdom Keeper, has been lost in the chaos. As one of the bloodiest battles of early medieval Scottish history scatters its survivors to the wind, Lailoken and his men must flee to exile in the mountains of the Lowlands, while nine-year-old Angharad must summon all Lailoken has taught her and follow her own destiny through the mysterious, mystical land of the Picts. In the aftermath of the battle, old political alliances unravel, opening the way for the ambitious adherents of the new religion: Christianity. Lailoken is half-mad with battle sickness, and Languoreth must hide her allegiance to the Old Way to survive her marriage to the next Christian king of Strathclyde. Worst yet, the new King of the Angles is bent on expanding his kingdom at any cost. Now the exiled Lailoken, with the help of a young warrior named Artur, may be the only man who can bring the Christians and the pagans together to defeat the encroaching Angles. But to do so, he must claim the role that will forever transform him. He must become the man known to history as “Myrddin.” Bitter rivalries are ignited, lost loves are found, new loves are born, and old enemies come face-to-face with their reckoning in this compellingly fresh look at one of the most enduring legends of all time.


Compare

The story continues in The Forgotten Kingdom, the second book in the astonishing Lost Queen trilogy, already hailed as “Outlander meets Camelot” (Kirsty Logan) and “The Mists of Avalon for a new generation” (Linnea Hartsuyker). AD 573. Imprisoned in her chamber, Languoreth awaits news in torment. Her husband and son have ridden off to wage war against her brother, Lailoken. The story continues in The Forgotten Kingdom, the second book in the astonishing Lost Queen trilogy, already hailed as “Outlander meets Camelot” (Kirsty Logan) and “The Mists of Avalon for a new generation” (Linnea Hartsuyker). AD 573. Imprisoned in her chamber, Languoreth awaits news in torment. Her husband and son have ridden off to wage war against her brother, Lailoken. She doesn’t yet know that her young daughter, Angharad, who was training with Lailoken to become a Wisdom Keeper, has been lost in the chaos. As one of the bloodiest battles of early medieval Scottish history scatters its survivors to the wind, Lailoken and his men must flee to exile in the mountains of the Lowlands, while nine-year-old Angharad must summon all Lailoken has taught her and follow her own destiny through the mysterious, mystical land of the Picts. In the aftermath of the battle, old political alliances unravel, opening the way for the ambitious adherents of the new religion: Christianity. Lailoken is half-mad with battle sickness, and Languoreth must hide her allegiance to the Old Way to survive her marriage to the next Christian king of Strathclyde. Worst yet, the new King of the Angles is bent on expanding his kingdom at any cost. Now the exiled Lailoken, with the help of a young warrior named Artur, may be the only man who can bring the Christians and the pagans together to defeat the encroaching Angles. But to do so, he must claim the role that will forever transform him. He must become the man known to history as “Myrddin.” Bitter rivalries are ignited, lost loves are found, new loves are born, and old enemies come face-to-face with their reckoning in this compellingly fresh look at one of the most enduring legends of all time.

30 review for The Forgotten Kingdom

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader

    Historical fiction fans, you have to read this epic trilogy. ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ This story continues where book one left off. Languoreth is in prison, awaiting her fate. The book continues on to include the story of Languoreth’s daughter, Angharad, who studies to become a Wisdom Keeper. Christianity is new and in constant battle with the old traditions. Now with this second book, I can solidly say these books are epic. The story is sweeping and epic in scope while also featuring characters you will Historical fiction fans, you have to read this epic trilogy. ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ This story continues where book one left off. Languoreth is in prison, awaiting her fate. The book continues on to include the story of Languoreth’s daughter, Angharad, who studies to become a Wisdom Keeper. Christianity is new and in constant battle with the old traditions. Now with this second book, I can solidly say these books are epic. The story is sweeping and epic in scope while also featuring characters you will absolutely cherish. It’s also a story you probably aren’t familiar with, and for that, I’m grateful for Signe Pike, and her extensive research on Languoreth, a hero for all times, and a story that needs to be shared. I can hardly wait for book three. There are two ways I write reviews for books I’ve absolutely loved. One seems to be in this style, where I want to tell the reader that I loved the book but not give too much away. The other is when I yammer on and on about how the book made me feel. I only mention that because, even though I did not yammer, I am completely smitten with these books! Many thanks to the publisher for the gifted copy. All opinions are my own. Many of my reviews can also be found on my blog: www.jennifertarheelreader.com and instagram: www.instagram.com/tarheelreader

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sean Gibson

    I don’t have to be psychic to know what you’re thinking right now (though I am, for the record). You’re thinking, “Gee, Sean, I’d sure like to visit 6th-century Scotland. Seems like a lot of fun. But, with a pandemic on, and the fact that lamewad scientists STILL haven’t invented time machines, there’s no way to do that. Also, I could really go for a bowl of soup right now. It’s getting chilly.” You are correct on most counts. Visiting 6th-century Scotland would be an absolute gas, we are indeed I don’t have to be psychic to know what you’re thinking right now (though I am, for the record). You’re thinking, “Gee, Sean, I’d sure like to visit 6th-century Scotland. Seems like a lot of fun. But, with a pandemic on, and the fact that lamewad scientists STILL haven’t invented time machines, there’s no way to do that. Also, I could really go for a bowl of soup right now. It’s getting chilly.” You are correct on most counts. Visiting 6th-century Scotland would be an absolute gas, we are indeed in the midst of a pandemic, and scientists are way too busy getting their rocks off on moon water to do something useful like master the intricacies of time travel. But, there IS actually a way to make the trip. “But, how do we do that, O Wise and Large-Proboscised-One?” is, naturally, your next question. Patience, my diminutive chewing herbivorous insects. There is a way. If you haven’t done so already, you’re going to want to read the first book of Pike’s Lost Queen Trilogy (titled, appropriately enough, The Lost Queen). Then, you’ll want to pick up The Forgotten Kingdom posthaste because it is an absolute delight. There are few authors as adept at evoking time and place as Pike. Her vividly detailed writing and ability to create the sights, sounds, feels, smells, and even tastes of a time long past are masterful. She doesn’t get lost in the minutiae, though; every bit of detail is in service to the story, creating a lived-in environment that adds depth and dimension to a group of compelling characters, foremost among them twins Languoreth (the eponymous Lost Queen herself; she is to these books as Eddie Van Halen was to Van Halen, if that helps) and Lailoken, along with Languoreth’s daughter Angarahad. If the first book in this series delivered a deep, rich backstory and explored relationships between a sprawling cast of characters (romantic, rivalrous, political, and otherwise), this book is a high-octane mix of epic battles, mystic excursions, and searching for self. (Those who loved the kissy parts of the first book may be left longing; those who squirmed like Fred Savage in The Princess Bride through those may feel relief.) The Forgotten Kingdom is compulsively readable and engrossing. And, unlike so many second books in trilogies, it feels like a complete tale, though it unquestionably leaves you feeling like a culdee in need of a piece of wood to carve into a cross (that is to say, eager for more). Don’t sleep on this series—it’s fantastic and you will dig it if you like history, romance, epic sagas, and those bygone eras where the line between reality and myth blurs in the fog-shrouded haze of a misty Scottish morn. (As for the soup…you’re on your own there. But, I will happily send left-handed can openers to my fellow gauche, sinister peeps if that’s helpful. Screw the (right-handed) man, man!)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Marialyce

    This,the second in the series in the Lost Queen trilogy, was a definite page turner. We follow the lives of Languoreth, her twin brother, Lailoken., and her young daughter Angharad, who is in training to become Wisdom Keeper. A huge battle is forthcoming and in all of this turmoil, death, and destruction, Angharad is lost. Guided by her uncle, Lailoken, Angharad travels a difficult road, having to learn, practice, and recall all the things that a Wisdom Keeper acquires as well as the struggle to This,the second in the series in the Lost Queen trilogy, was a definite page turner. We follow the lives of Languoreth, her twin brother, Lailoken., and her young daughter Angharad, who is in training to become Wisdom Keeper. A huge battle is forthcoming and in all of this turmoil, death, and destruction, Angharad is lost. Guided by her uncle, Lailoken, Angharad travels a difficult road, having to learn, practice, and recall all the things that a Wisdom Keeper acquires as well as the struggle to say alive., and grow into a young women who is special and talented in the ways of the old. She arrives in the land of the Pics, a land that is both mysterious and secretive where she must maneuver a pathway that is fraught with danger and menace.. Her path crosses with many and as she grows, she becomes stronger in the art of the Wisdom Keeper. In the meantime, the new faith of Christianity seems to be at battle with the old ways. Alliances are formed and the land is divided in those who love and cherish the ways of the old, and those who are flocking to the ways of this new belief system called Christianity. The rivalries continue and eventually they boil over as Lanfuoreth, now queen and all those she loves enter a time of battles fought, lives lost and rivalries brought to the forefront. Truly a marvelous addition to this series, this book with its excellent research done once again by Ms Pike, is a joy to read as we sit in judgement and worry over these real people caught up in the land of confusion and violence. Of course into this time of turbulence, comes Artur and “Myrddin.” and a myth and legend is born. Thank you to Signe Pike, Atria Books, and NetGalley for an advanced copy of this thrilling tale due out September 20, 2020

  4. 5 out of 5

    ABookwormWithWine

    Book two of a trilogy, and The Forgotten Kingdom by Signe Pike did not disappoint! It was another sweeping tale of Celtic history and war in AD Scotland. Languoreth is back, but there are also viewpoints from her brother Lailoken and daughter Angharad as well. I appreciated getting a couple other viewpoints in this one, but Languoreth is still my favorite of them all. There is more violence in this book of course since it is war, but not too many super disturbing parts or anything that isn't ski Book two of a trilogy, and The Forgotten Kingdom by Signe Pike did not disappoint! It was another sweeping tale of Celtic history and war in AD Scotland. Languoreth is back, but there are also viewpoints from her brother Lailoken and daughter Angharad as well. I appreciated getting a couple other viewpoints in this one, but Languoreth is still my favorite of them all. There is more violence in this book of course since it is war, but not too many super disturbing parts or anything that isn't skippable if you really wanted to. I listened to the audio again and of course it was fantastic. Toni Frutin is back as Languoreth, while Gary Furlong and Siobhan Waring voice Lailoken and Angharad, respectively. I liked all of them and was very happy to have Frutin back again. I loved the ending of The Forgotten Kingdom, and while you know there will be a third book since it's a trilogy, I was pretty satisfied with it considering who knows how long we will have to wait for the final book. I don't love cliffhangers, and while there are definitely questions, it doesn't really end in a cliffhanger in my opinion which is something I appreciated. You definitely can't go wrong with reading it or doing the audio, and I highly recommend both. I like the book because it has a map and the author's note which the audio I listened to was missing. I highly recommend reading these books in order, although they could also be read as standalones. I think you will get more of the story though if you read them in the correct order which is what I'm doing. I said it before and I will say it again, if you have any interest in Celtic history or historical fiction with a dash of fantasy, I highly recommend checking out both The Lost Queen, and The Forgotten Kingdom. They have both been five star reads for me, and I will be anxiously awaiting the third and final book in this moving tale. Thank you to the publisher for providing me with an advance review copy of this book, all opinions and thoughts are my own.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rikki

    CANT WAIT!!! I'm going to give this 5 stars as I patiently wait for this book that I know will be just as amazing as the first. 😋 CANT WAIT!!! I'm going to give this 5 stars as I patiently wait for this book that I know will be just as amazing as the first. 😋

  6. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Hupe

    Thank you, Atria books, Signe Pike, and Netgalley for the opportunity to read this book! As soon as I finished The Lost Queen, I jumped right into The Forgotten Kingdom by Signe Pike. The first book did leave off on a little cliffhanger. Languoreth is imprisoned in her own home as her husband and son go off the wage war on her brother and lover, and her daughter, Angharad, is among them. As time goes by, Angharad separated from her Uncle during the battle and finds herself in the hands of the Pic Thank you, Atria books, Signe Pike, and Netgalley for the opportunity to read this book! As soon as I finished The Lost Queen, I jumped right into The Forgotten Kingdom by Signe Pike. The first book did leave off on a little cliffhanger. Languoreth is imprisoned in her own home as her husband and son go off the wage war on her brother and lover, and her daughter, Angharad, is among them. As time goes by, Angharad separated from her Uncle during the battle and finds herself in the hands of the Picts and trained as a Priestess. In the meantime, Lailoken goes into exile. He is forever scarred from the battle and losing family members. And so a legend is born… The first book left me in tears and the second book has left me on the edge of my seat. This book is more battle focused. The battle scenes are wonderfully descriptive and make you feel the fear and urgency of survival. Watching Lailoken suffer from PTSD is utterly heartbreaking. His emotions and struggles are something that many today could relate to. Languoreth is such a wonderful main character. Her strength and dedication to her family are inspiring. She also knows her heart. She knows what must be done. Now, I can’t wait to find out what happens with Angharad. She is definitely her mother’s daughter. I loved watching her power grow. Now, I must wait for book three, which completely breaks my heart! I love how the author weaves a beautiful tale filled with magic, destiny, legend, and history. It is really like watching legend come to life. Netflix, you have a series that you need to check out. I rate this book 5 out of 5 stars. This book releases tomorrow! So grab your copy!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    I suspect that this series will break me like Outlander broke me. I fell in love with the characters like they were my friends, my family. I lived their emotions with them, their joy, their rage, their sadness. I didn't realize how much I missed historical fiction before reading these two books. I do not like to read about wars, but learning about them is so much interesting that I only want more. Can't wait to see what book 3 will bring (and already my heart is breaking because it'll be the last I suspect that this series will break me like Outlander broke me. I fell in love with the characters like they were my friends, my family. I lived their emotions with them, their joy, their rage, their sadness. I didn't realize how much I missed historical fiction before reading these two books. I do not like to read about wars, but learning about them is so much interesting that I only want more. Can't wait to see what book 3 will bring (and already my heart is breaking because it'll be the last book of the series). I will 1000% buy myself a physical copy of this one. I want to cherish it. Many thanks to Atria Books for the complimentary e-copy of this book through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amy Imogene Reads

    This sounds so good! Thank you to Atria Books for an ARC of this title in exchange for an honest review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    MaryBeth's Bookshelf

    I you read the author's note at the end of this incredible book, you can't help but be in awe of the amount of research that went in to this extraordinary story. I'm actually a little jealous. But it's interesting when you think about whether or not this book should be considered historical fiction or historical fantasy. I'll let you read it and decide. You can read the synopsis so I don't know how much I can add, other than to say this book blew me away. It's not a book I thought I would enjoy, I you read the author's note at the end of this incredible book, you can't help but be in awe of the amount of research that went in to this extraordinary story. I'm actually a little jealous. But it's interesting when you think about whether or not this book should be considered historical fiction or historical fantasy. I'll let you read it and decide. You can read the synopsis so I don't know how much I can add, other than to say this book blew me away. It's not a book I thought I would enjoy, but it is *easily* one of my favorites of the year.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Giveaway Win! Also I don't own and haven't read Book 1??!! I'm a bad person. Giveaway Win! Also I don't own and haven't read Book 1??!! I'm a bad person.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Linden

    This novel is the second in the Lost Queen trilogy, and is set in 6th century Scotland. Languoreth is imprisoned in her chamber, and her husband and his men have set off to fight her twin brother Lailoken. Her young daughter Angharad is traveling with her uncle, training to be a wisdom keeper. There are many tribal rivalries, and followers of the old ways find their beliefs challenged by Christians. Is Angharad dead, as Languoreth fears? Can any of these tribes co-exist when the desire for power This novel is the second in the Lost Queen trilogy, and is set in 6th century Scotland. Languoreth is imprisoned in her chamber, and her husband and his men have set off to fight her twin brother Lailoken. Her young daughter Angharad is traveling with her uncle, training to be a wisdom keeper. There are many tribal rivalries, and followers of the old ways find their beliefs challenged by Christians. Is Angharad dead, as Languoreth fears? Can any of these tribes co-exist when the desire for power is paramount? This book sweeps the reader away to another world, combining history with a compelling family saga. If you enjoyed The Mists of Avalon, consider embarking on this remarkable series. I'm glad that the publisher and Netgalley provided me with an ARC.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Out of the Bex

    A triumph of historical fiction The Forgotten Kingdom manages to outpace its predecessor in plot, action, and detail.. The Lost Queen was spectacular enough to put Pike's new trilogy on my must-read list when it arrived on bookstore shelves in 2018. It captivated with explorations into pagan thought, belief, and histories at a time in our past when critical changes to common ideologies in the British Isles were being battled out between two overarching rules for being: Paganism and Christianity. A triumph of historical fiction The Forgotten Kingdom manages to outpace its predecessor in plot, action, and detail.. The Lost Queen was spectacular enough to put Pike's new trilogy on my must-read list when it arrived on bookstore shelves in 2018. It captivated with explorations into pagan thought, belief, and histories at a time in our past when critical changes to common ideologies in the British Isles were being battled out between two overarching rules for being: Paganism and Christianity. The continuation of this smart series with The Forgotten Kingdom has only escalated in skill and presentation. Pike introduces new characters to the fold (but without neglecting old ones), delivers action packed scenes of battle, escape, and tragedy, and recreates the world of our now distant past with exquisite accuracy. Characters There is a unique type of fear in the minds of many readers when characters in a series shift. Perhaps it is a fear that a new character will too much take the place of an older one or perhaps that any new character may be too unlikable or uninteresting to satisfy them for the rest of the story. While The Forgotten Kingdom does focus on some newer main additions, like that of Languoreth's daughter, their inclusion only brings more enjoyment to the plot, increasing its level of complexity and allowing the reader to more widely explore this era of history. Plot Book one, The Lost Queen, took a more unhurried pace through Languoreth's childhood and early adutlhood as we came to know her realm. This technique offered the understanding we needed in order to grasp the potential scope of this epic story. The Forgotten Kingdom plot, on the other hand, runs swiftly with action, tension, and grace in the particularly satisfying way that only a good sequel can. I was so enamored by the speed and suspense of the first thirty to forty percent of the novel I almost felt relief to have a more measured pace for the middle third. This effect, like a rest between heartbeats, only served to increase my own as the excitement of the final pages raced to their delicious end. Recreating A Forgotten World Pike herself admits in her authors note that she can not stop many readers from placing The Lost Queen trilogy into the historical fantasy genre. However, she makes the important argument that her work is more based in historical fact than fiction. This common false assumption is likely for two main reasons. One, The Lost Queen deals with the story of Merlin and his sister, a story which has been fantasized over time, being made into a variety of spin-off legends, movies, books, and television shows in which magic plays an overarching role. This role of magic in the Merlin myth has become an integral part of the modern view of this story. Two, we live in a world so far removed from that of our pagan ancestors that we may now find it difficult to truly imagine what it may have been like within in a culture that fully believed in spiritual gifts (like second sight, for example) and in a godly reverence of the natural world. This distance from ancient beliefs leads many of us to reassign pagan belief as fantasy or magic. Pike offers the example of Judeo-Christian prayer as a way for modern audience to understand a common basis in pagan spirituality. I agree with Pike that this distinction of genre should be made and it is a mistake I made myself in my own review of The Lost Queen, which I referred to as of the magical realism and fantasy-light genres. The differentiation is critical not only for the viewpoint of the reader, but most especially so that the reader may fully appreciate and acknowledge the tremendous research effort of the author into a history that has become esoteric at best and lost to time at worst. The detail of historic information Signe Pike has gathered for these books and the accuracy with which she presents it (within the realm of her own creative license for story) is something I would be remiss not to applaud in any conversation regarding her work in The Lost Queen trilogy. I eagerly await the next book in her landmark series and will gladly invite other readers to find the same vivid escapism into a world so similar, yet so distant to our own until such time as the third book is revealed—and likely long after.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Genevieve Graham

    Someone suggested I read Signe Pike’s first novel, “The Lost Queen”, but I was loaded up with books to read, so I hesitated. “What’s it about?” I asked. “I’ll give you a hint,” she told me. “It’s lauded as ‘Outlander meets Camelot’.” SOLD. I set all other books aside and read both Part 1: “The Lost Queen” and Part 2: “The Forgotten Kingdom”. And it was SOOOOO worth it!!! This was the closest I have come to reading an “epic” story in so long, and I lost myself in the delicious details, both historic Someone suggested I read Signe Pike’s first novel, “The Lost Queen”, but I was loaded up with books to read, so I hesitated. “What’s it about?” I asked. “I’ll give you a hint,” she told me. “It’s lauded as ‘Outlander meets Camelot’.” SOLD. I set all other books aside and read both Part 1: “The Lost Queen” and Part 2: “The Forgotten Kingdom”. And it was SOOOOO worth it!!! This was the closest I have come to reading an “epic” story in so long, and I lost myself in the delicious details, both historically accurate and based on myth or mysticism. The characters were captivating, their adventures gripping, and I learned so much! I have no idea how Ms Pike did such incredible research, to be honest. And yet it reads so poetically … It’s no wonder we will have to wait a few years for Part 3. But I will be the first to PreOrder. 10/10 on this series for me!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Judithannag

    SPOILER ALERT. ***** I'm angry. This was the first time in my life that I pre-ordered a book. I loved the first book in the series that much. But I have beef now. (But, no, I was not confused when I hit the 5 stars -- read on.) AND, AGAIN: MAJOR SPOILER ALERTS, so proceed with caution. My issue is with the actual story lines. In book one, the Maelgwn-Languoreth story line is a major thread throughout the book. Yet, in 400+ pages of book 2, Languoreth sees him once and sort of ... dismisses him in t SPOILER ALERT. ***** I'm angry. This was the first time in my life that I pre-ordered a book. I loved the first book in the series that much. But I have beef now. (But, no, I was not confused when I hit the 5 stars -- read on.) AND, AGAIN: MAJOR SPOILER ALERTS, so proceed with caution. My issue is with the actual story lines. In book one, the Maelgwn-Languoreth story line is a major thread throughout the book. Yet, in 400+ pages of book 2, Languoreth sees him once and sort of ... dismisses him in three pages?! No, no, no. What are you doing to me, Signe?? You can't take me from "we knew one another in a past life, soul mates, etc." to "meh, maybe I only liked him because I wasn't supposed to have him and, like, now it's too hard." It felt abrupt and, on behalf of Maelgwn, I am lodging a complaint here. I'm really hoping that, in book 3, Languoreth's husband is dispatched. I don't care how: falls of a horse, dies in battle, succumbs to some disease -- whatever, it's the 6th century, anything could happen. Make him go away, because I need it. The Lailoken love story suffered a similar abruptness. He leaves on a raid and Eara (pretty sure I misspelled the name here but you'll know who I mean) dislikes him. Cool. But next time we come across them, they're married and deeply in love? It was jarring. Due to the shifting POVs, I assumed we'd get back to that part at some point, but we never did. Here's the thing. This is not a romance. I know this. I don't often read romances because they can get so over-written and cheesy. But this author has such a skillful hand with romantic scenes that it's devastating she didn't put that skill to work in book 2! In fact, it's almost like she purposefully avoided any such plot lines and I don't understand why. By now, you're probably wondering why I gave this book five stars. Two reasons. First, because the above gripe is subjective, i.e., my own preference on the story lines. The quality of the writing is superb. The story lines will keep you turning pages well into the night. The concept of bad-**s girls raising armies is fantastic. The author is masterful at recreating this time period (of which we know very little today). You'll feel like you're there and, similar to Outlander, you'll miss these characters when you turn that last page. The setting is lush and magical. There are a ton of characters but somehow it doesn't turn into a soup -- you'll be able to keep track of everyone. Second, and here's my very own book review plot twist, I am giving the damn thing five stars BECAUSE I am so outraged over some of the story lines. Isn't that the ultimate judgment of an author's skill and a book's magic-- the ability to get you so drawn in that you're completely invested in and outraged on behalf of people who don't exist? I have a book-hangover from this, which only happens to me once or twice a year, and only with true gems. (But I'm still mad about Maelgwn, Signe. Still mad.) Anyway. Not to be bossy, but you have to read this. Must. Now. Start with The Lost Queen, then get this, and -- going out on a limb -- pre-order the third one whenever possible. Just be warned that your little heart will hurt.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lorraine

    AD 573 - The Battle of Arderydd. Signe Pike’s The Forgotten Kingdom (Lost Queen #2) continues the story of Languoreth and her twin brother, Lailoken, who eventually “don(s) the mantle of Merlin.” Languoreth of Cadzow, in her time period, was an extremely “powerful” woman of early medieval Scotland. She was queen of Rhydderch Hael , a Briton who ruled the “kingdom of Strathclyde from AD 580-AD 614.” In AD 573 the Battle of Arderydd had Briton against Briton, brother-in-law and nephew versus uncle AD 573 - The Battle of Arderydd. Signe Pike’s The Forgotten Kingdom (Lost Queen #2) continues the story of Languoreth and her twin brother, Lailoken, who eventually “don(s) the mantle of Merlin.” Languoreth of Cadzow, in her time period, was an extremely “powerful” woman of early medieval Scotland. She was queen of Rhydderch Hael , a Briton who ruled the “kingdom of Strathclyde from AD 580-AD 614.” In AD 573 the Battle of Arderydd had Briton against Briton, brother-in-law and nephew versus uncles, and the people who wished to follow the Old Ways warring with those who thought they wanted to be Christian. In the Battle of Arderydd, the House of Pendragon of which Lailoken was a member was decimated. Although this major battle has been mostly forgotten as Languoreth became “The Forgotten Queen”, the survivors of which there were only nine found shelter in a cave in the Caledonian Wood. With her uncle Angharad, the youngest daughter of Languoreth, who was to be taken safely by her father, Rhydderch, the leader of the opposing forces, back to her mother, Languoreth, but was not. Thus, Angharad became lost to her mother. The author in her notes states that what happens to this youngest daughter is a result of the author’s imagination. With the Britons weakened, the Angles begin their move to take more land that was British. As Lailoken was still fighting from the ground, he hears Artùr. Why is he here? It is not his fight, but he helps Lailoken. Finally, with all fighting together against the Angles, names of all the different clans unimportant, the Angles retreated. The author finished painting this part of the preamble which leads, I believe, eventually to the man we know as King Arthur. 4 stars. So looking forward to part 3 of this trilogy!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Asheley

    My gosh, this series is fantastic. I thought the first book was exquisite and I feel the same way about this second book. The setting is lush and vibrant. I felt like I could feel the cold and snow; I could smell the fires and the ocean mist. It is truly scrumptious. Where the first book in the series was told by Langoureth, this second installment has three POV's: Langoureth, her twin brother Lailoken, and her daughter Angharad. I wondered if I would be able to love the rest of these characters My gosh, this series is fantastic. I thought the first book was exquisite and I feel the same way about this second book. The setting is lush and vibrant. I felt like I could feel the cold and snow; I could smell the fires and the ocean mist. It is truly scrumptious. Where the first book in the series was told by Langoureth, this second installment has three POV's: Langoureth, her twin brother Lailoken, and her daughter Angharad. I wondered if I would be able to love the rest of these characters as much as I had grown to love Langoureth, and I did, easily. All three perspectives are so interesting and tell the story beautifully. I fell particularly hard for Angharad in this story because she is such a unique character. These three characters all move around this world nearly constantly with goals in mind. Each group of people they encounter are exciting, with special things about them that made them stand out to me. I especially enjoyed the Pict people from the North, with their tattoos and cloaks and special language. This story is full of changing cultures, both politically and from a religious standpoint. The setting is late 500's AD, when the number of Christians in the area is steadily growing and the number of people keeping with the Old Ways grows fewer. There are huge conflicts over these changes, which bring unimaginable heartache and loss to each of these characters. Langoureth has become Queen since the first book, and her brother and daughter are set to occupy important positions as well. This family has every single thing at stake as they navigate the political conflicts and the rapid spread of the Christian faith. Angharad comes of age in this book, beginning the story as a child and growing up into a very important woman. Watching her transition from child to a young woman with power over the course of the story was heartbreaking in some ways because of her circumstances, but it was also really rewarding because of how independent and confident she was by the end of the book. These three characters spend large amounts of time apart from one another, and this made me think as I read. Way back in history, it wasn't unheard of for there to be no communication between loved ones for many years at a time. In contrast, if I am missing someone that I love, I can just call or instantly send a message directly to that person. I felt especially for Langoureth as she pined away for her child, her brother, and others that she loved when they were apart from her. This series is exceptional and I love these characters. The setting is absolute perfection. This was one of my most anticipated for the entire year, and it 100% lived up to my expectations and more. I received a digital copy of this story from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for a review. Thank you, Atria Books!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Stefanie

    The battle rages in the valley below you as you hide behind the shelter of trees. You shouldn’t be here, but something draws you toward the rage flowing between men. The clash of swords sends sparks into the air, blood drips down their silver blades. The enemy has yet to retreat and you know there is little time left. The sun sets in the distance, but the cloak of night will not bid well for the warriors you love. You hang you head in defeat as a single tear drips down your face, a smooth trail The battle rages in the valley below you as you hide behind the shelter of trees. You shouldn’t be here, but something draws you toward the rage flowing between men. The clash of swords sends sparks into the air, blood drips down their silver blades. The enemy has yet to retreat and you know there is little time left. The sun sets in the distance, but the cloak of night will not bid well for the warriors you love. You hang you head in defeat as a single tear drips down your face, a smooth trail in the dusty layer. It is over. They have lost. The Forgotten Kingdom, book two of The Lost Queen trilogy, picks up right where book one left off. While it does have a bit of retracing into the story of book one, I still recommend reading them in order. There is a lot of detail and imagery that will be easier to remember and retain if the books are read together. That being said, I enjoyed this book as much as the first and the battle scenes were spectacular. Book one was told from Languoreth’s perspective, while this book was told from her perspective, her brother Lailoken, and her daughter. I enjoyed the viewpoints of all three. This trilogy is not just a fantasy tale. It’s based from true Scottish history, which makes it even more intriguing for me. As a fan of historical fiction, tying the two genres together (fantasy & hist. fiction) has been such a treat. I highly recommend this book and can’t wait for the third book in the trilogy to be released! TW: War, Murder, Torture/Beatings, Gruesome Descriptions of Bodies from Battle, Infidelity, Death of a Child. *I received a gifted copy of this book from the publisher for my honest review.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa ❤️

    Thank you NetGalley for the advanced copy. I read the first book in the series, The Lost Queen, because of a book club pick. Honestly, I wasn’t sure what to expect but it definitely delivered..a great mix of fantasy and historical fiction, with a surprising twist of a beloved character who is both myth and legend. I was excited to get the second book, The Forgotten Kingdom, and continue the adventure. Adventure is definitely what you get with this one..epic wars, magic, kingdoms, death, life, st Thank you NetGalley for the advanced copy. I read the first book in the series, The Lost Queen, because of a book club pick. Honestly, I wasn’t sure what to expect but it definitely delivered..a great mix of fantasy and historical fiction, with a surprising twist of a beloved character who is both myth and legend. I was excited to get the second book, The Forgotten Kingdom, and continue the adventure. Adventure is definitely what you get with this one..epic wars, magic, kingdoms, death, life, struggle, strength, and the rise of Christianity in a world ruled by belief/worship in “gods”. These books do feel like YA in a lot of aspects, which is not necessarily a bad thing. I do think the first book is the strongest of the two, but I loved the addition of Angharad, a nine year old who must fight every second for her life, for her future, for her family (who is turn into two by the war against each other), for her powers, and her beliefs. She is a beautifully wonderful character that will instantly endure herself to the reader. “We may not always have the choice we would like, but we always have a choice.”

  19. 5 out of 5

    Annissa Joy Armstrong

    Thank you to Netgalley and Atria books for an advance copy of this book for my honest review. This book is the second in The Lost Queen trilogy and I was mesmerized right from the beginning of this beautiful book. The battle scenes are so descriptively written that I felt like I was right on the battlefield. I was cheering hard for Angharad to train hard to become a Wisdom Keeper. I was very intrigued by battles over Christianity. Exceptional research was done by the author. Loved this book and c Thank you to Netgalley and Atria books for an advance copy of this book for my honest review. This book is the second in The Lost Queen trilogy and I was mesmerized right from the beginning of this beautiful book. The battle scenes are so descriptively written that I felt like I was right on the battlefield. I was cheering hard for Angharad to train hard to become a Wisdom Keeper. I was very intrigued by battles over Christianity. Exceptional research was done by the author. Loved this book and can’t wait for the third installment.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Amanda (TheBookwormAdventures)

    I finished an e-arc (thank you, Atria Books and Netgalley!) of The Forgotten Kingdom the other night, which is the sequel to The Lost Queen, and am still reeling. If you know me, you know I absolutely love immersive historical fiction, and this series excels at it. It takes place in the 6th century, in the area that would become Scotland. The series focuses on the cultural shift from from the “old world” way of gods and magic to the rise of Christianity, and the subsequent politics and battles t I finished an e-arc (thank you, Atria Books and Netgalley!) of The Forgotten Kingdom the other night, which is the sequel to The Lost Queen, and am still reeling. If you know me, you know I absolutely love immersive historical fiction, and this series excels at it. It takes place in the 6th century, in the area that would become Scotland. The series focuses on the cultural shift from from the “old world” way of gods and magic to the rise of Christianity, and the subsequent politics and battles that arose from it. It has a touch of magic (featuring the man who would eventually become known as Merlin), but at its core is an extremely detailed, researched historical interpretation of the people and events of the time. I highly recommend this series!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Debbi

    The Lost Queen was one of my favorite books this year. I was thrilled that this book was released so soon after I finished with the first one. This book was well written with amazing research. The trilogy is obviously a labor of love. My issue with The Forgotten Kingdom is that the primary focus is war, conflict and alliances. For many this will be exciting, for me it was tiresome. I still loved the setting and the characters, but I had to push myself to finish. Now that so many battles have bee The Lost Queen was one of my favorite books this year. I was thrilled that this book was released so soon after I finished with the first one. This book was well written with amazing research. The trilogy is obviously a labor of love. My issue with The Forgotten Kingdom is that the primary focus is war, conflict and alliances. For many this will be exciting, for me it was tiresome. I still loved the setting and the characters, but I had to push myself to finish. Now that so many battles have been fought I look forward to the third book with the hope that there will be more exploration of the cultural, mystical side of the period.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jenna Rideout

    Thank you to the author, the publisher, and NetGalley for granting me access to an ARC of The Forgotten Kingdom in exchange for an honest review. The Forgotten Kingdom by Signe Pike is the sequel to The Lost Queen in what will eventually be a trilogy, but it does read easily as a stand-alone title. (I haven't read The Lost Queen yet and I was not lost.) My research tells me The Lost Queen was a coming of age story about Languoreth and Lailoken told entirely from Languoreth's point of view (POV.) Thank you to the author, the publisher, and NetGalley for granting me access to an ARC of The Forgotten Kingdom in exchange for an honest review. The Forgotten Kingdom by Signe Pike is the sequel to The Lost Queen in what will eventually be a trilogy, but it does read easily as a stand-alone title. (I haven't read The Lost Queen yet and I was not lost.) My research tells me The Lost Queen was a coming of age story about Languoreth and Lailoken told entirely from Languoreth's point of view (POV.) The Forgotten Kingdom continues on with adult Languoreth and Lailoken and Languoreth's young daughter Angharad all as different POV characters. It's an interesting take on Arthurian legend with many familiar names used (such as Uther Pendragon and a Gwen-variant), but the relations between traditional Arthurian characters have been remixed and reimagined to better align with real historical figures bearing those names. These are the battles and other conflicts that lead to the rise of King Arthur (Artur) and his Merlin (Myrddin), which we can assume will be the focus of book three. As someone who didn't read The Lost Queen and wasn't already emotionally attached to Languoreth, it took a long time to enjoy the sections of this book that were written in Languoreth's POV. Her first chapter is full of internal monologue exposition info-dumping and a whole lot of self-pity, which was an unwelcome downer in mood after enjoying a child's perspective on the world in Angharad's chapters and the iron-willed POV of Lailoken. With that said, rest assured that Languoreth's chapters got better and no longer tempted me to skim by about a third to half of the way through the book. I acknowledge and understand that this was a long book with a lot to say, but I desperately wanted the beginning to be longer. I wanted more of Lailoken learning to handle his niece. I wanted more of Angharad adjusting to life with the Pendragons and learning from Diarmid. I wanted to sit in on conversations between Lailoken and Eira as they got to know each other and fell in love. (Seriously, they were strangers in one chapter and lovers in the next.) The beginning of this book gives us enough of "before the war" to set up who everyone is, where they're starting from, and why we need to know. I don't feel like it gave us enough to make us care about certain characters. We get there eventually, caring about many of the characters, but I feel like one or two more chapters hanging out with the characters in the beginning could have done that before we followed Lailoken into battle. The different perspectives in this book are well written in that it's immediately obvious whose perspective you're reading even if you skip the identifiers on the chapter title page. As mentioned, I loved the Lailoken and Angharad chapters immediately, and the Languoreth chapters grew on me. Angharad's chapters were my favourites. The timeline was not consistent across the POV shifts, however. Dates are given on chapter title pages but with three perspectives and several years' worth of time difference later on in the book, sometimes those leaps back and forth in time got a little confusing. Most of Lailoken's chapters, for example, follow the outcome of the first battle we see with relatively little fast-forwarding, but by the time Lailoken has only progressed a couple of months from that battle, we've already read a much older Angharad. Some POV shifts required the mental flexibility to realize which parts we had just read will actually be in the future for the character we are now reading. I'm not overly familiar with Outlander (which this book has been compared to) but my mother loves those books and the NetFlix series, so I will definitely be urging her to pick up these books as well. That said, I do know from her gushing about the Outlander series that it's built around a modern character who travels many centuries back in time, and because of that I went into this book expecting something similar. Minor spoiler: There's no actual time travel in The Forgotten Kingdom other than the timeline jumping between POVs in the latter half of the book. Overall I enjoyed this book. As mentioned, Languoreth's POV grew on me and Lailoken and Angharad were great from the beginning. My opinion of this title improved along with Languoreth's chapters. At this point, I rate The Forgotten Kingdom a solid 4 stars out of 5 and I look forward to book three. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in historical fiction or fantasy, particularly those who enjoy Arthurian lore and 6th century Great Britain settings. -- This review was featured on my blog at https://www.westveilpublishing.com/?p...

  23. 4 out of 5

    Anne Wolfe

    What a wonderful treat when confined to shelter in place to have received this marvelous novel from NetGalley and Atria Books to read and review. Thank you. This historical novel takes place in Scotland in the late 500s when it is constantly at war with both local kingdoms and invading Roman armies. It also includes what might be called magical realism.. Perhaps these are only aspects of the practices of religions more ancient than Christianity. It is also a time when the Church is trying to sta What a wonderful treat when confined to shelter in place to have received this marvelous novel from NetGalley and Atria Books to read and review. Thank you. This historical novel takes place in Scotland in the late 500s when it is constantly at war with both local kingdoms and invading Roman armies. It also includes what might be called magical realism.. Perhaps these are only aspects of the practices of religions more ancient than Christianity. It is also a time when the Church is trying to stamp out the old gods and their followers. For the 5 days I was reading this book I was transported into Signe Pike's world so completely that when I stopped reading, I had to readjust to our own current grim reality. What could be more of an escape? This novel is the back story to Merlin, or Myrrdin. I have not read the first book in this series but plan to do that,) although I think this one stands on its own.. Lailoken, twin brother of Languoreth, soon to be queen of Strathclyde, is off to fight on the side of the Pendragons against her husband.. Lailoken is a warrior, but also a Wisdom Keeper, and he brings with him his niece , Angharad, an eight year old child who is gifted with foresight, in order to train her. Told in alternating chapters from each of the twins and the child, we also encounter Eira (Guinevere) and Arthur. The novel is packed with descriptions so deftly realized that you may sicken at the battles, dismemberments, and bloody ground.. The landscape is so immersive so to be almost visual. Pike also has an interesting way of describing eye and hair color. Never in nature have I noted the variety of red, chestnut. black, brown and eyes of blue ,green, gray, ice, amber and various nut colors. Interesting to note, these as part of Pike's gift of word-painting.. Seven years pass as Angharad is separated from her uncle, eventually becoming a Pict priestess and healer. She survives with the help of Eira, and a hermit monk. Different geographies of the country and different cultures, languages and customs contribute to Angharad's growth and development. Her longing for her home and her mother is poignant, yet when they reunite many years later, it is strained. I can't stress enough how this novel draws you in to the point that when it ends, it feels as if you have returned to an alternate reality. Few novels can do that. I look forward to Signe Pike's third.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rhiannon Johnson

    I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This second book in the Lost Queen trilogy was more action packed than the first with battles, allegiances, travel, adventures, and lots of new characters. Languoreth finally becomes queen at the age of 40 and while she may not feel a deep passion for her husband, they have come to a mutual understanding about their marriage. They have become political allies with a common interest of preserving the Old Ways whil I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This second book in the Lost Queen trilogy was more action packed than the first with battles, allegiances, travel, adventures, and lots of new characters. Languoreth finally becomes queen at the age of 40 and while she may not feel a deep passion for her husband, they have come to a mutual understanding about their marriage. They have become political allies with a common interest of preserving the Old Ways while acknowledging they must show support for the new religion (Christianity) sweeping through their kingdom. Plus, those darn Angles keep pushing the boundaries of the kingdom and something must be done! Who knew that I would be so interested in one of the bloodiest battles of early medieval Scottish history? Certainly not me! This series totally transported me. I found myself excited to get back to each of these 500+ page books everyday so that I could be whisked away to 6th century Scotland. My heart beat for Maelgwyn and broke for Angharad; I seethed in fury over Mungo, Gwergei, and Elufed's mother; and I was so impressed with Pike's character formation with Lailoken/Myrddin. In hindsight I guess I shouldn't be that surprised since I loved The Mists of Avalon and The Mabinogion Tetralogy. The backstory and author's notes provided with each of these books was absolutely mind-boggling and beyond impressive. The sheer amount of time and research she has poured over is evident in this epic tale. Although this book was just released, I am really anticipating the final book. The countdown is on! Come chat with me about books here, too: Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Pinterest

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lucretia

    Seldom does a sequel surpass a first part, especially when the first pat was a wonderful as The Lost Queen. For me, this was perfect. I was drawn into a story that was as rich and character driven as it was complex and plot driven. I didn't even realize it was possible to have both with such intensity in the same story. It's a sweeping historical epic that despite its length has me craving more. When the world is as absorbing and the story as thrilling, I don't imagine it'd be possible to get en Seldom does a sequel surpass a first part, especially when the first pat was a wonderful as The Lost Queen. For me, this was perfect. I was drawn into a story that was as rich and character driven as it was complex and plot driven. I didn't even realize it was possible to have both with such intensity in the same story. It's a sweeping historical epic that despite its length has me craving more. When the world is as absorbing and the story as thrilling, I don't imagine it'd be possible to get enough. In this part I got to see more of Lailoken, without giving away anything, his story is just so full of emotion. There is a great range to him and what he goes through. It also kept me in Languoreth's world allowing me to keep up with her husband and mother-in-law, whose stories are so intertwined in the most unexpected ways with what is going on outside of their view. But it was Angharad who absolutely blew me away in this part, just wow! I really want to tread lightly on spoilers so I'll back away and say that I never saw any of that coming and it was fascinating as light was shed on a part of the world that had only been hinted at before. The notes at the end of the book shed even more light, and inspired me to do further reading as well. It's a truly complex story with so many beautiful, heartbreaking, thrilling, and fascinating things going on that I know I'll be reading it again, and again, and it will have a home on my shelf, where I've made room for the third part, which I hope will be announced soon... please, please, I can't wait. This is hands down the most well-crafted story I've read in a long while, Must read.

  26. 5 out of 5

    The Lit Bitch

    4.5 stars The Lost Queen was one of my favorite reads of last year and I raved about it to everyone I knew. Not to mention I gave it to all my friends and family as a Christmas present too. So it’s easy to say that I had this next book on my TBR the instant I was done with the first book. The second it was available on Netgalley, I downloaded it and started reading. Not going to lie, this one took me a lot longer to read than I was anticipating. Not because it was bad (not at all!) I just started i 4.5 stars The Lost Queen was one of my favorite reads of last year and I raved about it to everyone I knew. Not to mention I gave it to all my friends and family as a Christmas present too. So it’s easy to say that I had this next book on my TBR the instant I was done with the first book. The second it was available on Netgalley, I downloaded it and started reading. Not going to lie, this one took me a lot longer to read than I was anticipating. Not because it was bad (not at all!) I just started it at a time when I was busy and couldn’t get to it as often as I wanted. So I am going to say this first—I liked the first book better. That’s not to say that this book wasn’t good, I just loved the first book so much that I knew going into this one that it would probably not replace the first one. As I mentioned, I started this one when I was reading a couple of other books and also starting a new job that was busy. So I went days sometimes before coming back to this one which I think caused me to feel a little disconnected with parts of the story. As always the writing was wonderful and the research—there is no other word for it than impeccable. I remember marveling at the research in the first book and this book is equally thought out and researched. I also read the author notes at the end of this book and was even more in awe of the painstaking research the author must have done in order to create such a wonderful saga. Her writing and descriptions—especially of the battles—were elegant, haunting and full of action and interest. But this isn’t a book that you want to rush through. There is a lot to digest and process so reading it quickly isn’t something that I would recommend, though I think I would have preferred to read this book a little faster than I did so I could keep everything fresh in my mind. I did have a hard time recalling certain characters and their role in the story. This book basically picks up right where the first book left off so don’t try and pick this one up if you haven’t read the first book. I recalled the principal characters just fine but I struggled a little at first to place characters and their history or connection to the larger narrative at first. But once I got back into the world and the characters I was perfectly fine. The cover is stunning and one that you will definitely want on your shelf. It’s truly one of the most eye catching, show stopping covers I’ve seen in a while. I am in love with it. Plus the story is unique and magical. I cannot wait to see how things come to an end in the upcoming book that marks the end of the trilogy. Though I liked the first book a little better, this was a superb installment and a worthy follow up to an amazing book. If you love historical fiction with a hint of magic, or if you love Arthurian legends, this book right here is a treat for you! See my full review here

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jenni

    I loved The Lost Queen so very much, and was very happy to receive an ARC of The Forgotten Kingdom. If I had any concerns that book two of this trilogy would disappoint, those concerns were promptly vanquished. There are so many things I absolutely love about this book (and really, this series so far). First, the writing: clearly, Signe Pike has done her research, and done it well. The various cultural and religious groups in the area of Scotland in this time period come to life in these pages. Th I loved The Lost Queen so very much, and was very happy to receive an ARC of The Forgotten Kingdom. If I had any concerns that book two of this trilogy would disappoint, those concerns were promptly vanquished. There are so many things I absolutely love about this book (and really, this series so far). First, the writing: clearly, Signe Pike has done her research, and done it well. The various cultural and religious groups in the area of Scotland in this time period come to life in these pages. Then, Pike takes care to add the Arthurian legend into the actual historical events and elevates this story to a whole other level. The prose is gorgeous, the descriptions are breathtaking, and I was completely immersed in this world. This is historical fiction done well—believable and entertaining. Next, the characters: in The Lost Queen, we first met twins Langoureth and Lailoken as children, and we’ve now followed them well into adulthood. I adore both of these characters and can’t get enough of their narratives. In this book, we have the added perspective of Langoureth’s daughter, Angharad, and her journey takes us in a different direction altogether, adding even more mystical elements and drama. The complicated love stories and the family bonds for these characters are so well done. The setting: Scotland in the late 6th century AD is such a fascinating time and place. The descriptions of the land and the people, especially the Picts, are fascinating. The struggles between the Celtic Britons, the Anglo-Saxons, and the Picts in the time when Christianity was spreading are perfect material for an exciting storyline and some epic battles. The fantasy elements: I love, love, LOVE how magic and Druidism are weaved into this story. Truly beautiful natural magic and mysticism blend together to set the stage for the Arthurian legend. Early in the book, I almost felt like I needed a map and a character guide (and maybe the hardcover will have those items—remember I’m working with a galley), but once I got back into the story, I had no trouble keeping everyone straight. Like in the first book, this volume encompasses several years, so be prepared for the time jumps periodically. I highly recommend this book to those loved The Lost Queen, and to fantasy/historical fiction lovers who are new to Pike’s epic series. Definitely start with The Lost Queen, though… these books won’t make much sense as standalone. Thank you to the author, the publisher, and NetGalley for my copy in exchange for this honest review. I am very much looking forward to the last book in the trilogy! ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️1/2

  28. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    Sincere thanks to the publisher, the author, and NetGalley for providing an ARC of this title in exchange for an honest review. 'The Forgotten Kingdom' is the second book in the Lost Queen trilogy by author Signe Pike. Pike's stories are being called a mix of 'Outlander' and 'The Mists of Avalon' for a new generation and that is certainly true to an extent. Pike's writing is fluid, descriptive, and atmospheric. She is easily able to transport readers to the world of sixth century Scotland and ap Sincere thanks to the publisher, the author, and NetGalley for providing an ARC of this title in exchange for an honest review. 'The Forgotten Kingdom' is the second book in the Lost Queen trilogy by author Signe Pike. Pike's stories are being called a mix of 'Outlander' and 'The Mists of Avalon' for a new generation and that is certainly true to an extent. Pike's writing is fluid, descriptive, and atmospheric. She is easily able to transport readers to the world of sixth century Scotland and applies the historical easily inland with the fantastical. However, while both Gabaldon and Zimmer Bradley are able to draw out character development alongside a sweeping in-world multi-generational story, Pike struggles. The narrative feels rushed and and Pike skips over some of the more vulnerable and intriguing aspects of her character's lives in order to move the timeline forward. The story begins where 'The Lost Queen' left off. Languoreth is imprisoned and waiting for news of the battle currently raging between her husband and her brother, Lailoken., and the remains of the Pen Dragon forces. As losses are felt on both sides, old alliances fall by the wayside, and the fate of Strathclyde hangs in the balance. Languoreth's husband emerges victorious from the battle and is crowned the new high king of Strathclyde, ushering in a new era of political allegiance by the royal family to growing Christian faith. Consequently, to survive her marriage and to keep the peace, Languoreth must keep her devotion to the Old Ways a secret. She must also mend her heart as she confronts the loss of two of her children as a result of the battle. Lailoken is banished and half-mad with post-traumatic stress from the battle. With the two siblings separated we follow their journeys through a split POV narrative. Another new addition to the story is Languoreth's daughter, Angharad, who was studying with Lailoken to be a Wisdom Keeper before he was called away to battle and she was lost in the fray. Wandering further into the Highlands, Angharad encounters other Wisdom Keepers and continues her studies of the Old Ways under the tutelage of the northern community. Pike delivers a sweeping story that is rich in historical details, but as I said, I feel like she is pushing the story forward too quickly as each book covers roughly 15-30ish years in the lives of her characters. The portions that she does slow down for, that reveal immense character development and empathy, are wonderfully done. Perhaps I'm just a greedy reader, but I want to savor these stories, I want more of the 'human' in this historical epic.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Cassie

    The Forgotten Kingdom by Signe Pike is the second installment in The Lost Queen trilogy and it definitely did not disappoint! Signe's first book in this series, The Lost Queen, brilliantly created the historical setting of 6th century Scotland. Her research is so thorough, and recreates so many stories that have been lost for centuries. I was thrilled for this second installment of Langoureth's journey, and quickly got lost in her world. Angharad featured in much of the story, and her journey is The Forgotten Kingdom by Signe Pike is the second installment in The Lost Queen trilogy and it definitely did not disappoint! Signe's first book in this series, The Lost Queen, brilliantly created the historical setting of 6th century Scotland. Her research is so thorough, and recreates so many stories that have been lost for centuries. I was thrilled for this second installment of Langoureth's journey, and quickly got lost in her world. Angharad featured in much of the story, and her journey is possibly my favorite. Lailoken and Eira's story is also so interesting, and I can't wait to see how it develops. I enjoy the slow and mesmerizing pace, the rich detail, and the well rounded cast of characters. The map and character pronunciation are also helpful! I'd say the first book is a 4, this one is a 4.25. I can't wait for the final book in this trilogy, and hope that many of these storylines get wrapped up. Thank you to Atria and NetGalley for the advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kriti | Armed with A Book

    I absolutely loved this book! As the second in the series, it added a number of new perspectives to Languoreth's from The Lost Queen. Fighting against family inflicts deep wounds and the road to the throne is full of pleasing someone's whims and dreams. Christianity and the Old Way continue to clash in this sequel. Brother and sisters are separated, with no news and no hope. Fast-paced, covering the new two decades of Languoreth's time and her reign as queen, this was a book I could not put down I absolutely loved this book! As the second in the series, it added a number of new perspectives to Languoreth's from The Lost Queen. Fighting against family inflicts deep wounds and the road to the throne is full of pleasing someone's whims and dreams. Christianity and the Old Way continue to clash in this sequel. Brother and sisters are separated, with no news and no hope. Fast-paced, covering the new two decades of Languoreth's time and her reign as queen, this was a book I could not put down. Angharad is one of my favorite characters in the book! She is a little girl who has seen so much and has unbound potential. She has had an amazing set of teachers and I don’t think she would have developed as much if the terrible things had not befallen the Dragon Warriors. I enjoyed how she connected with the people in her mother’s past too. I am curious to learn how this trilogy will end and eagerly await the next book. Many thanks to the publisher for proving me a review copy of the book! It has been wonderful to discover a new series and read it with my friend, Erynn. Check out my review and discussion of The Lost Queen and The Forgotten Kingdom on my blog.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.