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Like Streams to the Ocean: Notes on Ego, Love, and the Things That Make Us Who We Are

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A moving meditation on the hidden, sometimes difficult topics we must consider to live an authentic life, from the New York Times bestselling author of To Shake the Sleeping Self We aren't born into a self. It is created without our consent, built on top of our circumstances, the off-handed comments we hear from others, and the moments that scar A moving meditation on the hidden, sometimes difficult topics we must consider to live an authentic life, from the New York Times bestselling author of To Shake the Sleeping Self We aren't born into a self. It is created without our consent, built on top of our circumstances, the off-handed comments we hear from others, and the moments that scared us most when we were young. But in the busyness of our daily life, we rarely get the chance to think clearly about the questions that matter most. Who am I? Where do I belong? How much of who I am and what I do boils down to avoiding the things that make me feel small? We tuck these questions into the corner of our minds, but they drive our behavior far more than we give them credit for, even after we become adults. Writing with the passion and clarity that made his debut, To Shake the Sleeping Self, a national bestseller, Jenkins makes space to explore the seven topics we must think about in order to live a deeply considered life: ego, family, work, love, nature, death, and the soul. He considers the experiences that shape us into who we are, whether they're as heart-pounding as a rafting trip through the whitewater of the Grand Canyon, or as ordinary as the moment when we look in the mirror each morning. Through it all, Jenkins leads readers on a wide-ranging conversation about finding fulfillment in the people and places around us, and discovering the courage to show our deepest selves to the world. The Seven Subjects is a profound reflection from one of our most original writers, a necessary read for anyone seeking a companion on the road to understanding.


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A moving meditation on the hidden, sometimes difficult topics we must consider to live an authentic life, from the New York Times bestselling author of To Shake the Sleeping Self We aren't born into a self. It is created without our consent, built on top of our circumstances, the off-handed comments we hear from others, and the moments that scar A moving meditation on the hidden, sometimes difficult topics we must consider to live an authentic life, from the New York Times bestselling author of To Shake the Sleeping Self We aren't born into a self. It is created without our consent, built on top of our circumstances, the off-handed comments we hear from others, and the moments that scared us most when we were young. But in the busyness of our daily life, we rarely get the chance to think clearly about the questions that matter most. Who am I? Where do I belong? How much of who I am and what I do boils down to avoiding the things that make me feel small? We tuck these questions into the corner of our minds, but they drive our behavior far more than we give them credit for, even after we become adults. Writing with the passion and clarity that made his debut, To Shake the Sleeping Self, a national bestseller, Jenkins makes space to explore the seven topics we must think about in order to live a deeply considered life: ego, family, work, love, nature, death, and the soul. He considers the experiences that shape us into who we are, whether they're as heart-pounding as a rafting trip through the whitewater of the Grand Canyon, or as ordinary as the moment when we look in the mirror each morning. Through it all, Jenkins leads readers on a wide-ranging conversation about finding fulfillment in the people and places around us, and discovering the courage to show our deepest selves to the world. The Seven Subjects is a profound reflection from one of our most original writers, a necessary read for anyone seeking a companion on the road to understanding.

30 review for Like Streams to the Ocean: Notes on Ego, Love, and the Things That Make Us Who We Are

  1. 4 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

    Essays gives one a personal look at the authors thoughts and feelings. Subjects here, mimic many of those that impact all of us. Family, home, friendship, love death and others. Home struck a chord with me, his take on how our childhood homes become more special when we no longer live in them, memories of our lives lived within. Regrets about family members we didn't treat as well as we should have and taking the time in adulthood to recognize and correct our childhood blunders, missteps. Death Essays gives one a personal look at the authors thoughts and feelings. Subjects here, mimic many of those that impact all of us. Family, home, friendship, love death and others. Home struck a chord with me, his take on how our childhood homes become more special when we no longer live in them, memories of our lives lived within. Regrets about family members we didn't treat as well as we should have and taking the time in adulthood to recognize and correct our childhood blunders, missteps. Death brought his grandmother to the fore, his special relationship with her was one in which I could relate, since I had the same with mine. This should have wide range appeal, because within there is something for most people. His writing flows well, conversational in tone, gives one much to ponder. "I wonder how much of who we are comes down to doing what we know we're good at, and avoiding what makes us feel small." "So much mental energy is spent maintaining self-worth." I loved the title and the idea of the title. All our streams flow into ourselves and each other. Not the authors particular view, but my own.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carrie Knight

    this collection of essays is heartfelt and inspiring. jenkins is a very thoughtful writer, and reading his words feels like having a conversation with an old friend in a cozy coffee shop with a warm cup of tea. a friend who always challenges you to further open your mind and stay curious, a friend who you’ll always be safe with, one who will never judge you, but always encourage you. it’s a soothing balm during these uncertain times. i loved it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kobi Lee

    This book is a warm candle light, illuminating and softly healing the parts of me that are worn, raw, tender, and cracked. I highlighted a lot of this book. Sure, it has its flaws and its platitudes, but above all it's a gift. This book is a warm candle light, illuminating and softly healing the parts of me that are worn, raw, tender, and cracked. I highlighted a lot of this book. Sure, it has its flaws and its platitudes, but above all it's a gift.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Monica Welcker

    One of those books that you close at the end, and want to immediately start again. I have to imagine that I am not the only one who can relate on so many levels to Jedediah’s thoughts, and his style of writing is attention grabbing, and poetic.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Grace Modisett

    Reading this book felt like I was reading the author’s diary entries. At times the thoughts jump from one to the next and can feel disconnected, leaving you wanting more. But Jenkins’ writing is addicting and makes you as a reader want to be able to respond, sit with a coffee and keep talking about it with him. I particularly connected to his thoughts on friendship and loved some of the personal stories he shared, which were beautifully portrayed. I look forward to more of his writing to come.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Missy

    I hadn't read Jedediah Jenkns before. Perhaps people who are already fans of his will enjoy this book. It reads like a string of individual diary entries - loosely connected observations about life. The observations occasionally contradict each other. Not my cup of tea. I hadn't read Jedediah Jenkns before. Perhaps people who are already fans of his will enjoy this book. It reads like a string of individual diary entries - loosely connected observations about life. The observations occasionally contradict each other. Not my cup of tea.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

    There is something uniquely special about late night conversations with a friend where you discuss beliefs and ponder the strangeness of being human. Where you find commonalities and feel understood. This book is that late night conversation with a friend. It feels like a warm hug. The book sits with you and thinks with you. There is no plot. No destination as far as I can tell. It just asks you to show up, bring yourself, and be together. I am grateful I got to sit with this new friend and feel There is something uniquely special about late night conversations with a friend where you discuss beliefs and ponder the strangeness of being human. Where you find commonalities and feel understood. This book is that late night conversation with a friend. It feels like a warm hug. The book sits with you and thinks with you. There is no plot. No destination as far as I can tell. It just asks you to show up, bring yourself, and be together. I am grateful I got to sit with this new friend and feel at home. Some quotes: “Because of you, the universe is aware and observing itself. No matter how small and random you may feel, how meaningless, your ability to say, “That is beautiful,’ is a power that no mountain, no planet, no sun can imagine.” “Your sense of self is built or broken by the company you keep . . . But if you seek good people, wise people - not just to be associated with them, but to be good and wise yourself - I believe you will find them.” “Words are maps to human experience. Helpful . . . But life must be lived for the words to make sense.” “We spend all this time building our best selves, and it makes us demand someone who has also done the same.” “the most loving people we know are so comfortable in their own skin that the attention they give and love they share is totally free of expectations and baited traps. These people rarely get their feelings hurt, because they aren’t worried how they’re coming across or how they’re being treated. They’re too busy being interested in everyone and everything else.” “life is lived in seasons; it’s not a single arrow that hits or misses some imaginary bull’s-eye.” “A poem is made beautiful by restrictions in word choice.” “What is the ‘why’ behind your toiling?”

  8. 4 out of 5

    Justin Holman

    Jed's writing style makes it seem like he is sitting next to me and just telling me a story, which I LOVE! He has a great way of connecting philosophical ideas to his personal life and then challenging you to think hard on the topic and your own life. Jed's writing style makes it seem like he is sitting next to me and just telling me a story, which I LOVE! He has a great way of connecting philosophical ideas to his personal life and then challenging you to think hard on the topic and your own life.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Emily Nowlin

    A great book! Couldn’t put it down! Jedidiah’s writing transports you into his world, offering relatable tidbits about life, love & self. I loved the essay format and each chapter left me wanting to read more. This book was a pool of wisdom, real life moments and humor.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer M.

    I liked this one. I would read more by this author. It's an enjoyable read. Easy to follow. I think my favorite thing about this book was the author's writing style. 3/5 Stars I liked this one. I would read more by this author. It's an enjoyable read. Easy to follow. I think my favorite thing about this book was the author's writing style. 3/5 Stars

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ricardo Calles

    Loved reading this book. Gives me a lot of things to think about. I love just getting to see how Jedidiah processes and thinks through things.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Franklin Brown

    One of the more beautiful things I've read. A book of epiphanies and inspiration from both the canyons and the crannies of life. One of the more beautiful things I've read. A book of epiphanies and inspiration from both the canyons and the crannies of life.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lolo Onda

    I love all things Jed. His writing is so simplistic and yet SO COMPLEX. I always feel like his writing is so easy to connect with. I think the book started off a bit all over the place (and there were parts later on that felt the same for me) but overall, WOW! Loved this.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Aamot

    Honestly, I was so excited to get this book after waiting six months for it, and it was a bit of a letdown. I loved Jed’s first book; his philosophical musings scattered throughout the story were interesting and added depth to the memoir, but this one felt like a bunch of Instagram captions smashed together, which truth be told he actually disclosed. I bookmarked a few insightful pages that I’ll return to but overall, I just feel kinda disappointed.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Julia Esser

    "We've been attracted to the wrong people for the wrong reasons, seeking their affection or their bodies or their coolness to heal insecurities from middle school, self-hatred that thinks it can be erased by kissing the thing that hurt us." I love Jedidiah Jenkins. His first book "To Shake the Sleeping Self" brought me back to reading last year, right when I needed it the most. This book is much different, a collection of short stories and thoughts as opposed to one long narrative, but still exhi "We've been attracted to the wrong people for the wrong reasons, seeking their affection or their bodies or their coolness to heal insecurities from middle school, self-hatred that thinks it can be erased by kissing the thing that hurt us." I love Jedidiah Jenkins. His first book "To Shake the Sleeping Self" brought me back to reading last year, right when I needed it the most. This book is much different, a collection of short stories and thoughts as opposed to one long narrative, but still exhibits the kind of life insight that makes me (and I'm sure many others) feel seen. In this book, Jedidiah contemplates eight different ideas including love, ego, family, and friendship through short essays. My favorite part is that this isn't a self-help book; he isn't claiming to have it all figured out or to have found a specific path to success. You can hear his doubt in every page, but you can also hear his hope, his joy. It's a beautiful reflection on what it means to be human. On how we can struggle with dark and light at the same time. Beautifully written, it doesn't miss a larger narrative. I hope we get a lot more like this in future!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    First off I have to say, if you are able to get your hands on a physical copy of this book I highly recommend doing so. Like Streams to the Ocean is a collection of essays, passing thoughts, and short stories. I think this is a great book to carry around with you to make notes in as you go. It’s a book that feels like a friend is having a deep conversation with you and if you are able to jot down your thoughts it is as if you are talking back. Like Streams to the Ocean is also a great book to re First off I have to say, if you are able to get your hands on a physical copy of this book I highly recommend doing so. Like Streams to the Ocean is a collection of essays, passing thoughts, and short stories. I think this is a great book to carry around with you to make notes in as you go. It’s a book that feels like a friend is having a deep conversation with you and if you are able to jot down your thoughts it is as if you are talking back. Like Streams to the Ocean is also a great book to read however you wish. You can go from one of the eight sections; Ego, Family, Home, Friendship, Love, Work, Death, and The Soul, read a few excerpts then jump to another one based on how you are feeling. Like Streams to the Ocean is a book you can experience anyway you want. While I am not someone who reads really any nonfiction, I was very drawn to Jedidiah Jenkins’ first book, To Shake the Sleeping Self. When I read To Shake the Sleeping Self I fell in love with Jedidiah’s beautiful and heartwarming storytelling and I am beyond glad to see that same writing in Like Streams to the Ocean. Until you have read one of his books, it is hard to explain how comfortable and open Jedidiah’s writing feels. Based on what I have read, I feel that Jedidiah and myself are quite similar because we share many of the same ideals on life and ourselves so I may be biased, but I have heard from many others who read his first book that they love his writing and storytelling as well. If you are ever feeling down or questioning the world around you or simply just want a cozy nonfiction read I cannot recommend this book enough. I want to say thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for giving me the chance to read and review this great book!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    Jed baby, I am so sorry I had to do you like this. A 3 star for one of my favorite humans (that I don’t know) on this earth. It just didn’t do it for me friend. I love the way Jed looks at the world. He has such a keen and perceptive understanding of how it all works, that I find myself in awe, wanting to emulate his ideas and make them my reality. Which is what I’ve always loved about him. But in this one, they were all so jumbled around. This sophomore book had little golden nuggets of wisdom, Jed baby, I am so sorry I had to do you like this. A 3 star for one of my favorite humans (that I don’t know) on this earth. It just didn’t do it for me friend. I love the way Jed looks at the world. He has such a keen and perceptive understanding of how it all works, that I find myself in awe, wanting to emulate his ideas and make them my reality. Which is what I’ve always loved about him. But in this one, they were all so jumbled around. This sophomore book had little golden nuggets of wisdom, but he didn’t stay on an idea too long for me to get the full gist of what he was saying. He was writing the way we all think, jumping from one idea to the next, without much regard for fleshing out an idea. He was talking to us like we are his friends, which I’d like to think of myself as one, but I think in this moment, I didn’t need a friend, I wanted the deep, whip-smart, nuanced philosophy he is known for. I wanted him to spin a web I could get stuck in. I think the thing I took away the most from this was his ideas on work. We have only been working for like the past 100 years or so, so no wonder we all don’t know what we’re doing with our lives, because we never had the option to choose. Survival was our career. I found this concept rather fascinating because I hadn’t actually taken the time to think about it. As a world we’ve become so modernized we don’t even stop to think that in a past not too far away things were all so different, and there wasn’t the pressures we’re facing today. I’ve been having this crisis ever since I graduated college. Nothing appeals to me. I don’t like anything I’ve done. And I feel like I don’t have a calling. But maybe my calling is not having a calling?

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    “We are three things. The car, the driver, and the awareness of it all.” - Jedidiah Jenkins, Like Streams to the Ocean Omg that was such a refreshing read!! Thank you @penguinrandomhouse and @netgalley for gifting me an eARC of 𝙇𝙞𝙠𝙚 𝙎𝙩𝙧𝙚𝙖𝙢𝙨 𝙩𝙤 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙊𝙘𝙚𝙖𝙣 . (Available February 02, 2021) This book is a collection of the author’s reflections. It felt like scrolling through someone’s super insightful and super organized Twitter feed! This of course made it easy to fly through the entire book! 😂 Jedidia “We are three things. The car, the driver, and the awareness of it all.” - Jedidiah Jenkins, Like Streams to the Ocean Omg that was such a refreshing read!! Thank you @penguinrandomhouse and @netgalley for gifting me an eARC of 𝙇𝙞𝙠𝙚 𝙎𝙩𝙧𝙚𝙖𝙢𝙨 𝙩𝙤 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙊𝙘𝙚𝙖𝙣 . (Available February 02, 2021) This book is a collection of the author’s reflections. It felt like scrolling through someone’s super insightful and super organized Twitter feed! This of course made it easy to fly through the entire book! 😂 Jedidiah Jenkins’ writing is very captivating. So much food for thought. Plus, there is something about witnessing someone share the deepest parts of themselves to the world! It motivates me to discover the courage to do so as well. My favorite parts were his reflections on how he treated his brother when they were younger. It was very raw and I can only imagine how difficult it was to write all this down knowing that his family will read it. I just appreciated his honesty and his struggle. I got very emotional ( Not because it’s sad but because it’s true😉) when they finally managed to get closure at their sister’s Siblings Night. ( which btw is a tradition we should all implement!!) Another favorite of mine is his reflections on Community. The way he looked at it and how he put it down, got me thinking about my anchor points and what connects my community. But my most most favorite reflection was that about “ Secondhand Rediscovery”! 😭 Overall, insightful and easy read. 🌟🌟🌟🌟/5

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    “And the love of the sun is on the ocean. Its heat never stops, and before long, it breaks the water’s surface into a trillion little nothings, lifting them like blank souls and sending them back to the mountain. First as rising evaporation. Then clouds. Then as snow. And we do it all over again. We come from an endlessness wider than the horizon. We are pulled to the sky to begin again, narrow and clear, and make our return. Life is learning to ever widen.” Where to even begin. This book was bea “And the love of the sun is on the ocean. Its heat never stops, and before long, it breaks the water’s surface into a trillion little nothings, lifting them like blank souls and sending them back to the mountain. First as rising evaporation. Then clouds. Then as snow. And we do it all over again. We come from an endlessness wider than the horizon. We are pulled to the sky to begin again, narrow and clear, and make our return. Life is learning to ever widen.” Where to even begin. This book was beautiful, raw, honest, and amazing. It was full of poetic prose and so many beautiful quotes and tidbits of wisdom. I wrote down so many quotes and will be buying a hard copy when available so that I can highlight and mark it up and keep it as a reference for myself. I devoured this in less than 24 hours, as I found myself wanting to know what he would say next, or which topic was next. Jedidiah explores significant themes we all encounter on the journey of life; ego, family, home, friendship, love, work, death, the soul. His thoughts and reflections are relevant and many resonated with me to my core. This book examined the difficult situations and feelings we may encounter within these themes and how to draw from them to live our most authentic lives—being true to ourselves. It is a book I will not soon forget. In fact, I just finished and have the inclination to sit down and read it again to see what I didn’t catch the first time. It’s jam packed with goodness. I’d like to thank NetGalley for the ARC. This one spoke to the soul, and I am better for it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Allyssa (Book Ally)

    BOOK REVIEW Like Streams to the ocean by Jedidiah Jenkins 4 ⭐ I finished this book about a week ago but have been struggling to put a review together. As a whole I throughly enjoyed it. Jed breaks down life topics like ego, love, friendship, soul, death etc. Each chapter is dedicated to that specific topic. I really enjoyed how it was a mixture of his opinions, life experiences or that of his friends/people he had crossed paths with in life and also just conversations he had with friends. His wri BOOK REVIEW Like Streams to the ocean by Jedidiah Jenkins 4 ⭐ I finished this book about a week ago but have been struggling to put a review together. As a whole I throughly enjoyed it. Jed breaks down life topics like ego, love, friendship, soul, death etc. Each chapter is dedicated to that specific topic. I really enjoyed how it was a mixture of his opinions, life experiences or that of his friends/people he had crossed paths with in life and also just conversations he had with friends. His writing approach was really beautiful but also really realistic and not at all preachy like alot of these sort of books can be. I highlighted the shit out of it and strangely found so much of it either relatable or just resonated with me on another level. I say strangely because at a glance myself and this author have zero similarities but goes to show how once you dig deep there are probably many similarities between us all. I guess the only thing is i am not religious so I tried to keep that out of my opinion of the book. I normally don't read books with religious content. Which is why I was even more surprised at how much I loved this book. Release date 3 February 2021 Thanks to netgalley for an arc in exchange for an honest review

  21. 4 out of 5

    Angela L

    As the reader your encouraged to skip around sections and read those that may linger in your mind. In each section author Jenkins gives personal histories of his own life, trials, and tribulations. The honesty in section 2 about family had me crying. What broke me was the vulnerability between Jenkins and his brother Luke. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ You get glimpses of a relatable life with trauma and healing. The relatable sections always wrap up into life lessons and realizations. It’s honestly like having tha As the reader your encouraged to skip around sections and read those that may linger in your mind. In each section author Jenkins gives personal histories of his own life, trials, and tribulations. The honesty in section 2 about family had me crying. What broke me was the vulnerability between Jenkins and his brother Luke. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ You get glimpses of a relatable life with trauma and healing. The relatable sections always wrap up into life lessons and realizations. It’s honestly like having that conversation with a friend where all the barriers and embarrassments are gone. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Here are a few musings I enjoyed from the essays: ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ “Life is learning to ever widen” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ “For some of us, it’s like we’re all born with a mysterious mission, something that bugs us from day one. Mine has been a love for the natural world” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ “A mountain, as far as we can tell, doesn’t know it exists it is asleep forever” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ I’m a huge fan of Jenkins first novel To Shake the Sleeping Self so I’m partially biased. Thank you @netgalley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    Reading Jenkins’ work makes you feel connected to yourself. He conveys that everything in life has a role to play in your constant state of becoming, and that the moment you think you know yourself there’s a chance that something can shift. His first book “To Shake the Sleeping Self” made me fall in love with his writing style. He has a way of saying what you’re feeling in such a simple and relatable way, as if you’re listening to a good friend tell you a story over coffee. He seems to understan Reading Jenkins’ work makes you feel connected to yourself. He conveys that everything in life has a role to play in your constant state of becoming, and that the moment you think you know yourself there’s a chance that something can shift. His first book “To Shake the Sleeping Self” made me fall in love with his writing style. He has a way of saying what you’re feeling in such a simple and relatable way, as if you’re listening to a good friend tell you a story over coffee. He seems to understand human beings and makes observations that hit you with waves of clarity. And he stays real and doesn’t hide from hard revelations about his identity and own sense of self. This is a book that can be read again and again, as the snippets and short essays are broken into distinct chapters that touch on core aspects of human life and can be easy to digest. However, you’ll read some of his stories and feel like you understand what he’s saying only to read it again with a different meaning. He’s good at challenging the mind to wander out of old patterns you accepted as truth. And he acknowledges how our unique states of existence are not as different as we tend to believe.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alex Morze

    This is amazing collection of anecdotes, musings, reflections, and nuggets of wisdom. All throughout I felt every section large and small contained truths that applied both to me in a very specific personal way - as though it was written especially for me, and also for anyone who may pick up this book. At points it was eerie how much it felt like it was someone writing a book about my own life. When it comes to memoirs and personal essays, I feel there is a hard line to walk in writing about one This is amazing collection of anecdotes, musings, reflections, and nuggets of wisdom. All throughout I felt every section large and small contained truths that applied both to me in a very specific personal way - as though it was written especially for me, and also for anyone who may pick up this book. At points it was eerie how much it felt like it was someone writing a book about my own life. When it comes to memoirs and personal essays, I feel there is a hard line to walk in writing about oneself and one’s experiences without making the book about oneself. Jedidiah walks this line masterfully, sharing his own thoughts and experiences but flawlessly pointing all of it to a larger, powerful message that any reader can apply for themselves. Jenkins writes beautifully, clearly, and poignantly on each page, and I am grateful to have read this. Will happily recommend to anyone and everyone.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Brynn | readyourworriesaway

    Thank you @randomhouse for the gifted copy. Like Streams to the Ocean is a collection of essays on seven different themes of life: Ego, Family, Work, Love, Nature, Death, and The Soul. These essays are deep and heartfelt, and they can be read in any order that you want or need. Reading them felt like having a conversation with Jenkins himself— his storytelling is so honest and allows you to explore connections within your own life. I did not read Jedidiah Jenkins’ first book, but I am now adding Thank you @randomhouse for the gifted copy. Like Streams to the Ocean is a collection of essays on seven different themes of life: Ego, Family, Work, Love, Nature, Death, and The Soul. These essays are deep and heartfelt, and they can be read in any order that you want or need. Reading them felt like having a conversation with Jenkins himself— his storytelling is so honest and allows you to explore connections within your own life. I did not read Jedidiah Jenkins’ first book, but I am now adding it to my list. I breezed through this one, but I can definitely see myself coming back to it when I am having questions about the world or my life. I love how thought-provoking Jenkins’ writing is. The essays provide you with thoughtful meditation on topics we must consider to live an authentic life. I definitely recommend grabbing a copy of Like Streams to the Ocean. I’m looking forward to reading whatever Jedidiah Jenkins writes next!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

    I was so excited for this book to be released. I fell in love with his first book and connected so much to how he felt, so I was eagerly awaiting the day I could read his next one! As always, I love his writing style. His words flow so naturally like streams to the ocean (pun intended). "The weirdness in you is the very thing some needs." -How on earth did he know that was something I needed to hear, when lately I've been questioning my own "weirdness"? Overall, I did enjoy his perspective and I was so excited for this book to be released. I fell in love with his first book and connected so much to how he felt, so I was eagerly awaiting the day I could read his next one! As always, I love his writing style. His words flow so naturally like streams to the ocean (pun intended). "The weirdness in you is the very thing some needs." -How on earth did he know that was something I needed to hear, when lately I've been questioning my own "weirdness"? Overall, I did enjoy his perspective and could relate to a lot of what he was trying to convey. I was disappointed his Canyon trip wasn't a whole chapter (or book), because I was so invested on wanting to know every detail about his time there! I LOVE reading about his travels. A part of me feels like I can connect with him the most when he is out there in a new place experiencing all the firsts that place has to offer. In those moments it feels like I'm sitting there right next to him getting to experience it too.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Caroline Fontenot

    I love Jedidiah's writing and though I enjoyed listening to this one, wasn't as gripped as I was by his first. Part of that was simply that I've heard him tell a handful of stories from this book on various Podcasts and previous writings online. I was wrecked, and still can't shake, the idea that he talks about early on that there was a last time our parents held us and we don't remember it. I can't stop thinking about that, and he wrote about it so beautifully. “And then there are people in dra I love Jedidiah's writing and though I enjoyed listening to this one, wasn't as gripped as I was by his first. Part of that was simply that I've heard him tell a handful of stories from this book on various Podcasts and previous writings online. I was wrecked, and still can't shake, the idea that he talks about early on that there was a last time our parents held us and we don't remember it. I can't stop thinking about that, and he wrote about it so beautifully. “And then there are people in drawn to because they are different. Perhaps they have something I lack. I am attracted to stoics because I’m extroverted confetti. I am attracted to bodies because I too often get lost in my mind. I am attracted to people who can’t find the right words because in a way, not knowing what to say is lovely to me. I am attracted to people who express and heal their pain because I run from mine.” - 
“I want to lean into the steady goodness of making good things.”

  27. 4 out of 5

    Anne Soucy

    I absolutely loved this book. Incredibly honest, I felt like I got to know Jed through his writing— energy, privilege, beauty, pain and flaws alike. I’ve followed him on Instagram for a long time and had a somewhat idealized picture of this adventurer philosopher traveling the wilderness with his gorgeous California friends. This brings him into the real world, humanizing him with unflinching self-evaluation. Jed’s writing is, as always, gorgeous and thought provoking. I’m not sure that he has a I absolutely loved this book. Incredibly honest, I felt like I got to know Jed through his writing— energy, privilege, beauty, pain and flaws alike. I’ve followed him on Instagram for a long time and had a somewhat idealized picture of this adventurer philosopher traveling the wilderness with his gorgeous California friends. This brings him into the real world, humanizing him with unflinching self-evaluation. Jed’s writing is, as always, gorgeous and thought provoking. I’m not sure that he has any wildly new ideas or earth shattering revelations, but his essays are thoughtful meditations on our relationship with ourselves and the world we live in, and the ways we might find happiness, purpose, and beauty as we make our way. A beautiful read that had me laughing out loud and crying and highlighting like mad. Will definitely be re-reading. Thank you Jed!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Evan Petruzzi

    This book started fresh, pristine, clean...by the end, it is covered in notes and underlined phrases, random thoughts and questions I asked myself. It’s interesting how such simple musings can stop you mid word and have you sit and stare into space thinking about life, death, the body, the soul, and how they all connect. Like Streams to the Ocean...what a brilliant title for a book full of essays and streams of conscious. Jedidiah Jenkins is a brilliant writer who has a way of relating to the re This book started fresh, pristine, clean...by the end, it is covered in notes and underlined phrases, random thoughts and questions I asked myself. It’s interesting how such simple musings can stop you mid word and have you sit and stare into space thinking about life, death, the body, the soul, and how they all connect. Like Streams to the Ocean...what a brilliant title for a book full of essays and streams of conscious. Jedidiah Jenkins is a brilliant writer who has a way of relating to the reader through personal experiences and curious ramblings. This book took me longer to finish than I was expecting and that was merely due to the amount of times I stopped to ponder on a point he made. I quickly learned I needed to keep something to write with nearby because my mind was working fast.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay Bolender

    “If you want to change something, the most important question you can ask yourself is: ‘To what end?’” This book is a wondrous collection of thirty-something musings that resonate deeply and remind me of the existence of my soul. I ear-marked so many pages that the top of my book looks like an accordion. This is a book for people who are ready to feel, ready to create, ready to be their true, whole, unapologetic selves in a calm, compassionate, empathetic way. There is very little proof or new ev “If you want to change something, the most important question you can ask yourself is: ‘To what end?’” This book is a wondrous collection of thirty-something musings that resonate deeply and remind me of the existence of my soul. I ear-marked so many pages that the top of my book looks like an accordion. This is a book for people who are ready to feel, ready to create, ready to be their true, whole, unapologetic selves in a calm, compassionate, empathetic way. There is very little proof or new evidence within this book, and some parts are uncomfortable and disquieting, but mostly because everything rings unabashedly true. Reading this book has the same feeling as lying in a forest and staring up at the stars. It’s a big universe out there and we are all just trying to find our place in it.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    Sometimes when I read a someone's book, the words are so relatable that am I reminded that I am not as much as an outcast as I thought I was. I felt very at home reading this book which seems to be a collection of vulnerable essays and one liners that talk about the various human experiences that shapes up into ourselves. I personally enjoy the "stream of conscience" type of narration, but that is more than likely because that narration is similar to how my neurotic mind works. I received a digita Sometimes when I read a someone's book, the words are so relatable that am I reminded that I am not as much as an outcast as I thought I was. I felt very at home reading this book which seems to be a collection of vulnerable essays and one liners that talk about the various human experiences that shapes up into ourselves. I personally enjoy the "stream of conscience" type of narration, but that is more than likely because that narration is similar to how my neurotic mind works. I received a digital galley of this book from NetGalley (and unfortunately am submitting a pretty late review), but I actually plan to purchase a physical copy for myself. The whole book may not be relatable to everyone at one time, but I truly believe there something for every reader here.

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