counter create hit Sonata, Vol. 1: Valley of the Gods - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Sonata, Vol. 1: Valley of the Gods

Availability: Ready to download

Two cultures clash on a planet both sides believe is their Promised Land. The Rans are a peace-loving people. The Tayans are a race of warriors who are here to colonize and control. There are the Sleeping Giants, who may be monsters or the gods of legend. Sonata is a young woman who will break all the rules to find her place in this world, and she's not about to let Two cultures clash on a planet both sides believe is their Promised Land. The Rans are a peace-loving people. The Tayans are a race of warriors who are here to colonize and control. There are the Sleeping Giants, who may be monsters or the gods of legend. Sonata is a young woman who will break all the rules to find her place in this world, and she's not about to let sleeping gods lie.


Compare
Ads Banner

Two cultures clash on a planet both sides believe is their Promised Land. The Rans are a peace-loving people. The Tayans are a race of warriors who are here to colonize and control. There are the Sleeping Giants, who may be monsters or the gods of legend. Sonata is a young woman who will break all the rules to find her place in this world, and she's not about to let Two cultures clash on a planet both sides believe is their Promised Land. The Rans are a peace-loving people. The Tayans are a race of warriors who are here to colonize and control. There are the Sleeping Giants, who may be monsters or the gods of legend. Sonata is a young woman who will break all the rules to find her place in this world, and she's not about to let sleeping gods lie.

30 review for Sonata, Vol. 1: Valley of the Gods

  1. 4 out of 5

    RG

    3.5* It has elements of being epic but just never gets there.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    So there are these colonists but the good sort on an alien world. They came there from another alien world, not Earth, but they are still human, because of course the leads have to be human, don't they? Not just on TV and film SF, where there are budgetary and technical constraints, but in comics too, because this diversity business is all well and good, but you wouldn't want to take it too far. Still, they live in harmony with the indigenous sentient race, and ride the local big flying So there are these colonists – but the good sort – on an alien world. They came there from another alien world, not Earth, but they are still human, because of course the leads have to be human, don't they? Not just on TV and film SF, where there are budgetary and technical constraints, but in comics too, because this diversity business is all well and good, but you wouldn't want to take it too far. Still, they live in harmony with the indigenous sentient race, and ride the local big flying things, and only use violence as a last resort. But what's this? Some other colonists have arrived. Still not from Earth, still very human-looking, but these ones wear sinister uniforms, and believe in hierarchy, and pollution, and generally being rotters. They've dammed the river and are starving the nice lot (oh, and the natives) out! So the nice lot decide to very carefully blow up the dam, but only a little bit, because apparently that's a thing, and also that way it won't be taken as an act of war, which seems optimistic given what dicks the other lot are, but OK. Except oh no! The whole dam's gone up! How unexpected! General carnage ensues, including ancient ruins, rampaging giant monsters, the usual...and, of course, the revelation that while the natives are Wise, they are also Devious (but it's fine how stereotypical this all is, because they're not human, right?). Oh, and there's a half-arsed across-the-barricades romance, which feels a lot like an attempt to grab some of that Saga dollar. I'm tempted to sum this up as Anne McCaffrey by way of Pat Mills, but I've only read one short story collection by McCaffrey, and that decades ago, so I'm aware this might be either too harsh or too kind on her and I really wouldn't know either way. And to be fair even to modern Pat Mills (not something I say very often at all), for all the failings of his work, he'd know better than to pull the noble (or are they?) savage bullshit in this. I was drawn to Sonata by the David Hine credit, because I don't see that name enough, but while he often works at an emotional pitch somewhat higher than could pass for naturalistic, I don't expect his stuff to clunk like this. Turns out he's co-writing with the artist, Brian Haberlin, who as such is presumably a biggish deal though the name doesn't ring much of a bell for me; the blurb leads his credits with Witchblade, which might explain why. His stuff is...fine, I guess? Pleasant enough science-fantasy, but nothing to take your breath away, and certainly nothing to justify wading through this swamp of clapped-out tropes. (Edelweiss ARC)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    Awkward and undemanding characters embarking on an unceremoniously and unrealistically fragmented journey? This does not bode well. SONATA rumbles into the science fiction curio of off-world terraforming, species conflict, and giant skeleton gods that can communicate with the spirit of the dead. Very little in this comic book makes sense. The book's initial, high-concept story pits competing factions of humanity against one another but on a second planet. The humans do what they've always done: Awkward and undemanding characters embarking on an unceremoniously and unrealistically fragmented journey? This does not bode well. SONATA rumbles into the science fiction curio of off-world terraforming, species conflict, and giant skeleton gods that can communicate with the spirit of the dead. Very little in this comic book makes sense. The book's initial, high-concept story pits competing factions of humanity against one another but on a second planet. The humans do what they've always done: bicker over natural resources and pledge to wipe out one another simply because they can. Nothing fancy. At the center of the series is a typically enterprising young woman who is the best at doing whatever she does because she doesn't pay attention to the rules: training local beasts, flying scouting missions, befriending aliens, and so forth. Sonata, the woman, gets into a bit of trouble when she crosses paths with an equally, typically enterprising young man from a rival tribe. Pau is an idiot, but what great heroine in survivalist comic books hasn't fall in love with an idiot? Pau's tribe is full of technocratic warmongers, so it's no surprise he's conflicted when it turns out the locals he believed to be backward "primitives" turn out to be caretakers of the giant god-beasts that roam the barren landscape. SONATA is tedious and predictable. The two feuding sides bury one another in melodrama, kill a few stragglers and innocents, lose precious sons or daughters, and are confused as to whether they should unite for a common cause or diverge from the obvious solution in favor of good old fashion human ego. The book's high-concept comes into play when one considers the vast quantity of resources and energy required of these two competing forces to terraform a new planet, survive, and plot their enemy's death. Unfortunate for readers, very little about these characters' technology is explained, very little of their political motivations are given context, and very little of their practical history (of how they got to where they are now) is given the time of day. In this comic, whatever happens, just happens. The local alien folk are morally ambiguous without much reason. The requisite young male and young female egoists fall in love . . . obviously. And the distant home world of the narrative's feuding clans is suddenly very interested in not allowing its once-absconded rebels to live in peace. SONATA also bears aesthetics that are difficult to digest. The rendered art prioritizes stiff, awkwardly cel-shaded models that move poorly, take up too much space, are prone to bad lighting, and leave no room for functional environmental design to take root. The character designs are a mixed bag, which probably doesn't help considering a number of the appointed antagonists look as rudimentarily "evil" as their dialogue is rudimentarily written. Of the simple pleasures wrought by most sci-fi books, SONATA checks a few boxes — but does not do so particularly effectively.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Well see. Sort of a Romeo and Juliet if their parents were conquistadors from different planets and Mercutio was the noble savage. Plus ancient gods - that owe a lot to Monstress for looks, communication and unknowable history. The planet, animals and MCs are beautifully drawn though (in an EMO sort of way). Everyone else is uglier and more cartoonish. We’ll see. Sort of a Romeo and Juliet if their parents were conquistadors from different planets and Mercutio was the noble savage. Plus ancient gods - that owe a lot to Monstress for looks, communication and unknowable history. The planet, animals and MC’s are beautifully drawn though (in an EMO sort of way). Everyone else is uglier and more cartoonish.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    The rating might be a little high for this, but I've enjoyed the story so much that I've already begun reading volume two in digital floppies. I can accept a creator taking a bunch of old tropes, mashing them up and presenting it as a new story. Hell , James Cameron got away with it with Avatar. Whereas Avatar was very predictable, including the end, Sonata, while predictable is doing better character work. I mean we know Treen and his race are presenting to the colonists as primitive, and yeah I The rating might be a little high for this, but I've enjoyed the story so much that I've already begun reading volume two in digital floppies. I can accept a creator taking a bunch of old tropes, mashing them up and presenting it as a new story. Hell , James Cameron got away with it with Avatar. Whereas Avatar was very predictable, including the end, Sonata, while predictable is doing better character work. I mean we know Treen and his race are presenting to the colonists as primitive, and yeah I know Treen, et al are kind of running a scam on the Tayans and the Ran. Tayans are the more warlike and aggressive of the colonial factions. The Ran are the more passive, and less technology inclined. The Ran don't hate tech, they're just better at finding ways to live within their and the planet's resources means. As conflict appears about to break out things get complicated. Sonata is a Ran, and on the surface it appears she is headed for a Romeo and Juliet affair with the Tayan Pau. But, especially as the reader gets into the beginning of volume two Pau unfortunately shows how selfish he is, and tied to his Tayan culture. Is war going to happen between the two colonial factions? Most likely. will the natives interfere-duh? Is more going to be revealed about the planet's first settlers (you mean it's not the Tayans, or Ran)?

  6. 4 out of 5

    BookDragon

    Sonata's people have colonized a new planet but their clan isn't the only one. When a dam has been built cutting off their water her peaceful can tries to come to an agreement with a clan that is hell bent on starting another war. After a sabotage plan goes horribly wrong Sonata and the warring clan's son stumble upon ancient ruins, weapons, and vehicles, all of which could help the clans in the fight against the Sleeping Giants that also inhabit the planet. Sworn to secrecy about the ruins and Sonata's people have colonized a new planet but their clan isn't the only one. When a dam has been built cutting off their water her peaceful can tries to come to an agreement with a clan that is hell bent on starting another war. After a sabotage plan goes horribly wrong Sonata and the warring clan's son stumble upon ancient ruins, weapons, and vehicles, all of which could help the clans in the fight against the Sleeping Giants that also inhabit the planet. Sworn to secrecy about the ruins and technology from another specie of natives living on the planet. But nothing as it seems and life on this new planet is about to get way more complicated. The illustrations are really nice and the story is okay. I wasn't really sucked into this and I got heavy Romeo & Juilet vibes from this. As you can guess I am not a romance fan. No it doesn't drive the story but its annoying none the less. I don't think this is something that is memorable and if I were to see Volume 2 I might possibly read it but only if it has a cover anything like this one.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Taka

    I give it a 7/10. I'd say it's Saga without the clever dialogues, without the sex, without that critical view on people and politics. Sure, most of the other elements in Saga are here as well. The story about a girl who falls in love with a guy who's in the wrong side of the war, two very different cultures. A fantastic world embodied in beautiful art. In the end it feels like a canned story, a washed down Saga, where dialogues are insipid and you can tell where the story is heading to. It feels I give it a 7/10. I'd say it's Saga without the clever dialogues, without the sex, without that critical view on people and politics. Sure, most of the other elements in Saga are here as well. The story about a girl who falls in love with a guy who's in the wrong side of the war, two very different cultures. A fantastic world embodied in beautiful art. In the end it feels like a canned story, a washed down Saga, where dialogues are insipid and you can tell where the story is heading to. It feels too forced at times. I'd recommend this story to anyone who loves sci fantasy, those who value visuals over dialogues and story.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amit Verma

    .It is best illustrations carrying comic I have read in a long time. Art and graphics are extremely wonderful, vivid and innovative. All faces appear 3 dimensional and backgrounds including big monsters are wonderful. Even if no captions were written you could read this one to see great artwork. Story is themed on well known theme of two rival families whose kids fall in love but it happens in future in some other galaxy. Sonata is main character and see is expertly developed into a super hero who .It is best illustrations carrying comic I have read in a long time. Art and graphics are extremely wonderful, vivid and innovative. All faces appear 3 dimensional and backgrounds including big monsters are wonderful. Even if no captions were written you could read this one to see great artwork. Story is themed on well known theme of two rival families whose kids fall in love but it happens in future in some other galaxy. Sonata is main character and see is expertly developed into a super hero who has kind heart. I liked the book very much. Just one of books you keep flipping through again and again. Thanks edelweiss plus and publisher for review copy.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Amanda K

    Thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for the e-arc! Interesting art style. Fairly standard sci-fi exploration and colonization plot where the people colonizing bite off more than they can chew. The conflict between the two human-seeming groups feels like a setup to keep us from looking at the the plot holes surrounding the natives and the cyclopean mind-melting beings known as sleeping giants. Interesting enough for a second look.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    A strong four stars. There's little that's entirely fresh in this book, but nor is there little that is not done well. The artwork is a lot more competent than the average comic, for one, so even if the prologue here seems to pitch two characters that look the same into battle with each other, we still survive. In fact there are three races, all struggling to find a balance between each other, on a planet peopled by no end of critters, including gigantic cyclopean monsters thought to be gods. A strong four stars. There's little that's entirely fresh in this book, but nor is there little that is not done well. The artwork is a lot more competent than the average comic, for one, so even if the prologue here seems to pitch two characters that look the same into battle with each other, we still survive. In fact there are three races, all struggling to find a balance between each other, on a planet peopled by no end of critters, including gigantic cyclopean monsters thought to be gods. This certainly looks like a title to keep track of, for while it does stick to formulaic tropes, it is all done much more effectively than you'd expect.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Vincent Stoessel

    Scifi comics are so rare now and it's a joy to find a good one. Well done in terms of story and art. Reminds me of a modern take on the dragon riders of pern mixed with a dash of heavy metal and Romeo and Juliet. Looking out for volume 2

  12. 4 out of 5

    Art

    This was better than I thought it would be. Its s a complex story that has some interesting twists and turns. Nothing ever seems to be what it seems. That's what I like about it. The artwork on this book is awesome. Worth the read. Looking forward to seeing where this is going in future volumes.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Martha

    A pretty generic mishmash of sci-fi/fantasy tropes, a half-baked romance, and an art style designed for augmented reality that winds up looking stilted and plasticine in ebook form. Not terrible, but Im not likely to continue it. A pretty generic mishmash of sci-fi/fantasy tropes, a half-baked romance, and an art style designed for “augmented reality” that winds up looking stilted and plasticine in ebook form. Not terrible, but I’m not likely to continue it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Logann Merritt

    3.5

  15. 4 out of 5

    Richard Kim

    I'm very happy when reading books like this i love this site

  16. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I could have done without the prologue

  17. 4 out of 5

    Randall Andrews

    Part steampunk, part fantasy, part science fiction. All brilliant in writing and art. A story not unlike Hayao Miyazaki and his creations. A must read!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

  19. 4 out of 5

    Vermillion

  20. 5 out of 5

    Maria

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mithun Gangopadhyay

  22. 4 out of 5

    Pop Bop

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mary

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dominica

  25. 4 out of 5

    GrilledCheeseSamurai (Scott)

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kenny

  27. 5 out of 5

    Chris Jenson

  28. 4 out of 5

    C. Sellner

  29. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

  30. 5 out of 5

    Fiore

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.