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Dial H for Hero Vol. 2: New Heroes of Metropolis

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What would you do if you could become any superhero for just an hour? The catch? Who you become is absolutely random. The H-Dial returns to the DC Universe courtesy of Sam Humphries as part of Brian Michael Bendis' new imprint for young heroes: Wonder Comics! In the aftermath of Mr. Thunderbolt's attack on Metropolis, teenage Miguel Montez and Summer Pickles have to figure What would you do if you could become any superhero for just an hour? The catch? Who you become is absolutely random. The H-Dial returns to the DC Universe courtesy of Sam Humphries as part of Brian Michael Bendis' new imprint for young heroes: Wonder Comics! In the aftermath of Mr. Thunderbolt's attack on Metropolis, teenage Miguel Montez and Summer Pickles have to figure out how to stop him. Join Miguel and Summer as they encounter even more DC classic characters--including The Flash! Aimed at providing readers with honest and innovative reading experiences, Brian Michael Bendis' Wonder Comics is a celebration of the moments of in life when discoveries are made--when purpose and meaning are revealed and destinies are defined. Featuring the young heroes of the DC Universe as penned by all-star creative teams in exciting new adventures that will celebrate the wonders of life, love and comics. Collects Dial H for Hero #7-12


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What would you do if you could become any superhero for just an hour? The catch? Who you become is absolutely random. The H-Dial returns to the DC Universe courtesy of Sam Humphries as part of Brian Michael Bendis' new imprint for young heroes: Wonder Comics! In the aftermath of Mr. Thunderbolt's attack on Metropolis, teenage Miguel Montez and Summer Pickles have to figure What would you do if you could become any superhero for just an hour? The catch? Who you become is absolutely random. The H-Dial returns to the DC Universe courtesy of Sam Humphries as part of Brian Michael Bendis' new imprint for young heroes: Wonder Comics! In the aftermath of Mr. Thunderbolt's attack on Metropolis, teenage Miguel Montez and Summer Pickles have to figure out how to stop him. Join Miguel and Summer as they encounter even more DC classic characters--including The Flash! Aimed at providing readers with honest and innovative reading experiences, Brian Michael Bendis' Wonder Comics is a celebration of the moments of in life when discoveries are made--when purpose and meaning are revealed and destinies are defined. Featuring the young heroes of the DC Universe as penned by all-star creative teams in exciting new adventures that will celebrate the wonders of life, love and comics. Collects Dial H for Hero #7-12

30 review for Dial H for Hero Vol. 2: New Heroes of Metropolis

  1. 5 out of 5

    Artemy

    Amazing conclusion to one of the all-time best DC comics, a beautiful love letter to the sheer joy, wackiness and creativity of comics in general, and a very human story with a huge heart right at the center of it all. Sam Humphries and Joe Quinones are two creators who I didn't think much of before this series came about, but together they created some strange alchemy the likes of which I've never quite seen in the past. I will really miss getting new issues of Dial H every month, but boy am I Amazing conclusion to one of the all-time best DC comics, a beautiful love letter to the sheer joy, wackiness and creativity of comics in general, and a very human story with a huge heart right at the center of it all. Sam Humphries and Joe Quinones are two creators who I didn't think much of before this series came about, but together they created some strange alchemy the likes of which I've never quite seen in the past. I will really miss getting new issues of Dial H every month, but boy am I infinitely grateful that this book exists at all.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    This was tremendous. It's wacky. It's meta. It's retro. It's incredibly inventive. It tackles what it means to be a hero. Joe Quinones gets a ton of credit for mixing up his art style to whatever is needed for the story. Hopefully, we'll see more Dial H for Hero sooner rather than later.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    This is one of my older guilty pleasures from when I was growing up (yes, the original Robby Reed Dial H series). I've read, or tried all of the reincarnations (except I need to catch up on Melville's run). So, with that caveat does this really stand out from the others? No, not really. It is nice that it tries to tie into the original series quite a bit. That Miguel is Latino and Summer, a female, is co-lead garners diversity points. For me though... The pulling together of meta-fiction story poi This is one of my older guilty pleasures from when I was growing up (yes, the original Robby Reed Dial H series). I've read, or tried all of the reincarnations (except I need to catch up on Melville's run). So, with that caveat does this really stand out from the others? No, not really. It is nice that it tries to tie into the original series quite a bit. That Miguel is Latino and Summer, a female, is co-lead garners diversity points. For me though... The pulling together of meta-fiction story points take a very skilled writer. Something just didn't seem to quite work as the series veneered more and more into that realm. Fun, yes. Great, nope.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Christian Zamora-Dahmen

    When I read Vol. 1, I was definitely on board but I felt the concept was a bit all over the place. With this second volume, in spite of the first couple of issues that dragged a bit too long and added too little, the whole thing finally came together. This gimmick that was used whenever a new hero was created, with the whole change in art, tone and narrative, finally added to the story instead of being just distracting and a bit annoying. Anyway, I felt satisfied with the outcome and how things ev When I read Vol. 1, I was definitely on board but I felt the concept was a bit all over the place. With this second volume, in spite of the first couple of issues that dragged a bit too long and added too little, the whole thing finally came together. This gimmick that was used whenever a new hero was created, with the whole change in art, tone and narrative, finally added to the story instead of being just distracting and a bit annoying. Anyway, I felt satisfied with the outcome and how things evolved and wrapped up. These are such endearing characters, I hope they don't fade too much into the background now that they showed up in Young Justice. Read in single issues.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Yet another run of Dial H for Hero that's over too soon. Humphries' storytelling runs from good to great. There are some top issues here, such as #7, which gives us quick views of many of the New Heroes of Metropolis, and #8, which tells the story of Mr. Thunderbolt in a totally new way. And the rest of the volume, with a battle for the multiverse, is pretty good too even if it's more standard four-color antics. Much of the fun here is the creation of yet another mythology for the dials (and for t Yet another run of Dial H for Hero that's over too soon. Humphries' storytelling runs from good to great. There are some top issues here, such as #7, which gives us quick views of many of the New Heroes of Metropolis, and #8, which tells the story of Mr. Thunderbolt in a totally new way. And the rest of the volume, with a battle for the multiverse, is pretty good too even if it's more standard four-color antics. Much of the fun here is the creation of yet another mythology for the dials (and for the multiverse itself)! This is another place that Humphries really soars. The only deficit? It's repetitive. I don't know if Humphries was paying homage to old stories, or just didn't know them. His big reveal in #8 is totally unshocking because it's the exact same big reveal (under similar circumstances, with the exact same character) as was found in the New Adventures of Superboy run of "Dial H"). And the whole storyline with different dials was seen pretty recently in Dial H: Deluxe Edition. Still, it's good fun. I'd happily have a deluxe volume of these 12 issues right next to the one by China Mieville.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    Miguel and Summer find themselves on opposite sides of the war between The Operator and Mister Thunderbolt, as they both race to assemble the Four Dials and change the course of history! The second half of Sam Humphries and Joe Quinones' Dial H For Hero is, like the first half, superb. It's a deep dive into what makes a hero, at it's core, which is always a fascinating subject, and it's told through the lens of two characters with very different ideas on the answer. Neither of them is infallible, Miguel and Summer find themselves on opposite sides of the war between The Operator and Mister Thunderbolt, as they both race to assemble the Four Dials and change the course of history! The second half of Sam Humphries and Joe Quinones' Dial H For Hero is, like the first half, superb. It's a deep dive into what makes a hero, at it's core, which is always a fascinating subject, and it's told through the lens of two characters with very different ideas on the answer. Neither of them is infallible, and that propels the story forward in multiple ways as Mister Thunderbolt and The Operator war over who should get control over the Four Dials and alter the Heroverse forever. The conclusion is open-ended enough that it's almost guaranteed that we'll see these characters again, while also offering a definitive ending to this chapter of their story. Of course, Joe Quinones' artwork goes a long way towards the success of the book. As before, he remains massively versatile when he turns his hand to different heroes and their origin stories, often bringing in multiple art styles on a page which must have been insanely difficult to pull off. There's also a fill-in issue by Mike Norton which features lots of new heroes trying to track down someone, which has both lovely artwork and a hilarious conclusion that really made me smile. Dial H For Hero stands head and shoulders above the other Wonder Comics books as the one with the broadest appeal, but also the most to say on the subject of superhero comics without being preachy and always remaining entertaining. This will be a book well worth revisiting in the future when you need a pick-me-up.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Scratch

    This volume is a little more of a head-scratcher than volume 1. It was more reminiscent of an 80s story, if you can follow my reasoning. Did you ever watch Star Trek: The Next Generation? And you saw Data constantly talk about how he wanted to be human? Even though he was stronger, smarter, faster, etc., and he was aware of hundreds of different sentient species (some of which had truly awesome abilities), he had a weird fetish that he wanted to be human and nothing else? And you know how along t This volume is a little more of a head-scratcher than volume 1. It was more reminiscent of an 80s story, if you can follow my reasoning. Did you ever watch Star Trek: The Next Generation? And you saw Data constantly talk about how he wanted to be human? Even though he was stronger, smarter, faster, etc., and he was aware of hundreds of different sentient species (some of which had truly awesome abilities), he had a weird fetish that he wanted to be human and nothing else? And you know how along those same lines, there are all of those movies or after-school specials where at the end the main character decides that he doesn't really need magic or superpowers, he just needs to accept himself? That. That was the theme of this book, and it was hammered over your head every issue. That's not even a spoiler-- Miguel struggled with wanting to use the H-Dial again in the very first issue of this volume, and Summer was the voice of reason telling him not to. Over. And over. Again. And this message rings a little hollow for a couple reasons. First, because the entire conceit of this title is that a person can pick up the phone and become a superhero, instantly, with unearned powers. Like, that's the whole premise of the book and why people are reading it. To see that happen. Secondly, I feel like fiction has really moved on from this message in the last decade or two. Where before heroes were morally obligated to say that they wanted a normal life, and bemoan their cursed existence as someone gifted with superpowers and an exciting life? Now, we are finally at the point where Spider-man can openly talk about how having powers is cool. The message that, "You don't need powers, you only need to be yourself!" has always been a bit of a slap in the face to comic book fans. Because the message is always telling us, the readers, that we are wrong to fantasize about becoming superheroes. That we're greedy, immoral, etc., because we're buying what the comic book writers are selling. This has always been an inherently hypocritical message, to blame the reader for fantasizing about hero worship. So now here we are in 2020, and this tired old message is the only real theme of this book. The artists do impressive work calling to mind old-fashioned comics from earlier decades. A few 90s references, a few manga references, and at least one surprising 60's, Scooby-Doo-esque reference. Also, pleased to have a low-key gay moment for the main character. Although I'm displeased that these Millennials couldn't bring themselves to utter the g-word.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Dial H for Hero: New Heroes of Metropolis is a trade paperback that collects the last six issues (Dial H for Hero #7–12) of the 2019 series and collects one-issue storylines that are more or less interconnected. In the aftermath of Mr. Thunderbolt's attack on Metropolis, teenage Miguel Montez and Summer Pickles have to figure out how to stop him. As they settle into their roles as both Metropolis' youngest heroes and newest residents, they discover being a hero doesn't exactly pay the rent, while Dial H for Hero: New Heroes of Metropolis is a trade paperback that collects the last six issues (Dial H for Hero #7–12) of the 2019 series and collects one-issue storylines that are more or less interconnected. In the aftermath of Mr. Thunderbolt's attack on Metropolis, teenage Miguel Montez and Summer Pickles have to figure out how to stop him. As they settle into their roles as both Metropolis' youngest heroes and newest residents, they discover being a hero doesn't exactly pay the rent, while they help out the Operator race to claim the two remaining H-Dials before Mister Thunderbolt does with the entire Multiverse hanging in the balance. Sam Humphries penned the entire trade paperback. For the most part, it is written rather well. New residence to Metropolis, Miguel Montez and Summer Pickens uses their H-Dials to help out the Operator to outmaneuver Mister Thunderbolt to gain access to the remaining H-Dials and the powers to control the multiverse. Along the way, they also encounter Granny Goodness, Kalibak, and Harli-Monitor. Joe Quiñones penciled the entire trade paperback with co-penciling credits with Colleen Doran, Michael Avon Oeming, Erica Henderson, and Stacey Lee (Dial H for Hero #7–9, 11–12). Since he was the only penciler, the artistic flow of the trade paperback flowed exceptionally well. His penciling style is wonderful and is apropos and accentuates the series rather well. The co-pencilers also did rather well in aiding Quiñones to the overall artistic experience. Overall, this Dial H for Hero series is a wonderfully written series. Penned exclusively by Humphries, he rather remarkably brought an obscure title to mainstream. The premise of being a superhero and adolescence mixes rather well. Together, in a short dozen issues, Humphries and main penciler Quiñones created two characters from scratch with their humble beginnings in a small town in California to Metropolis – the City of Tomorrow. It tells an unoriginal tale about adolescents trying to survive in a changing world as part-time superheroes. While it is regrettable that the run was rather short, what was presented was done rather well. Hopefully, we will see these remarkable characters again. All in all, Dial H for Hero: New Heroes of Metropolis is a good and satisfying conclusion to an equally wonderful series.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Norman Cook

    The Dial H for Hero franchise has always been a bit silly, and this version fits that description. There is a thin plot about a war between "The Operator" and the seemingly villainous Thunderbolt Club. Both entities have ties to the original Dial H for Hero protagonist, Robbie Reed, as cleverly revealed in issue #8's off the wall Memento-esque backwards story. There is no reference to the outstanding, but somewhat dark, version of Dial H, Vol. 1: Into You written by China Miéville a few years ag The Dial H for Hero franchise has always been a bit silly, and this version fits that description. There is a thin plot about a war between "The Operator" and the seemingly villainous Thunderbolt Club. Both entities have ties to the original Dial H for Hero protagonist, Robbie Reed, as cleverly revealed in issue #8's off the wall Memento-esque backwards story. There is no reference to the outstanding, but somewhat dark, version of Dial H, Vol. 1: Into You written by China Miéville a few years ago. This is a much more youth-friendly version. The moral, which is drilled into the reader quite forcibly, is that you should be happy with yourself and not pine to be a superhero. I'm not sure how relevant a rotary phone is in today's world, especially with the target audience. Of special note is the artwork. Joe Quiñones is able to channel a number of different styles, with some help from a handful of other artists. It would be interesting to have an annotated version to get all the references, as there are homages to everything from Krazy Kat to manga, and I certainly didn't get them all. I read this book as individual comic book issues.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    Basic Plot: Mister Thunderbolt unites the 4 H dials and Miguel and Summer have to save the multiverse. The art continued to be incredible throughout this volume, with lots of tributes to classic characters from DC and beyond. Many different art styles were represented, and really remained the showcase reason to read the book. The story was solid, with humor, heart, and action. I'm really sad that this series ends here, as I would love to see more adventures with these characters.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Marco

    After all the enthusiastic reviews I read online I had pretty high expectations from this and I really wanted to like it, but Dial H for hero is definitely not my cup of tea. The gimmick of the secret origins is too repetitive and became annoying pretty soon and there's too much silliness for my taste. Great art, though.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    When this story goes off the rails it goes off the rails in a really big and messy way. This is just page after page of headache-inducing, rapid-fire gibberish... the comic book version of staring directly into a strobe light for six hours while someone screams as loudly as they can a half an inch away from your ear.

  13. 5 out of 5

    John

    Sockamagee!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Yas

    Man, this entire series was so much fun! I loved how everything fit together and the crazy ideas they came up with and it being a study of Superman at the same time. So freaking cool.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Wojciech

  16. 5 out of 5

    Murphy

  17. 4 out of 5

    Otávio Barboza

  18. 5 out of 5

    mercedes

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jim Demonakos

  20. 5 out of 5

    L

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Spaulding

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

  23. 4 out of 5

    Max Pacheco

  24. 4 out of 5

    M

  25. 5 out of 5

    Miga Avalos

  26. 4 out of 5

    André Habet

  27. 5 out of 5

    Paul Griggs

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rod

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tim

  30. 4 out of 5

    Gray

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