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SFSX (Safe Sex), Vol. 1: Protection

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From notorious kink writer TINA HORN and featuring a diverse group of artists comes SFSX (SAFE SEX), a social thriller about sex, love, and torture. It's SEX CRIMINALS in Gilead, Hustlers with a SUNSTONE twist. In a draconian America where sexuality is strictly bureaucratized and policed, a group of queer sex workers keep the magic alive in an underground club called the Di From notorious kink writer TINA HORN and featuring a diverse group of artists comes SFSX (SAFE SEX), a social thriller about sex, love, and torture. It's SEX CRIMINALS in Gilead, Hustlers with a SUNSTONE twist. In a draconian America where sexuality is strictly bureaucratized and policed, a group of queer sex workers keep the magic alive in an underground club called the Dirty Mind. Using their unique talents for bondage and seduction, they resolve to infiltrate the mysterious government Pleasure Center, free their incarcerated friends, and fight the power! Collects SFSX (SAFE SEX) #1-7


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From notorious kink writer TINA HORN and featuring a diverse group of artists comes SFSX (SAFE SEX), a social thriller about sex, love, and torture. It's SEX CRIMINALS in Gilead, Hustlers with a SUNSTONE twist. In a draconian America where sexuality is strictly bureaucratized and policed, a group of queer sex workers keep the magic alive in an underground club called the Di From notorious kink writer TINA HORN and featuring a diverse group of artists comes SFSX (SAFE SEX), a social thriller about sex, love, and torture. It's SEX CRIMINALS in Gilead, Hustlers with a SUNSTONE twist. In a draconian America where sexuality is strictly bureaucratized and policed, a group of queer sex workers keep the magic alive in an underground club called the Dirty Mind. Using their unique talents for bondage and seduction, they resolve to infiltrate the mysterious government Pleasure Center, free their incarcerated friends, and fight the power! Collects SFSX (SAFE SEX) #1-7

30 review for SFSX (Safe Sex), Vol. 1: Protection

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    A near future where a combination of puritanical America and feminists have taken over the government and outlaw all but missionary sex. Our protagonists are a bunch of sex workers who work in sex clubs. I liked the sex positive nature of the book. I couldn't stand the amount of torture in the book, especially the graphic nature of it. Parts of this were like watching Saw or Hostel. The book is very graphic in its use of both torture and depiction of sex so be warned. It's definitely not a book A near future where a combination of puritanical America and feminists have taken over the government and outlaw all but missionary sex. Our protagonists are a bunch of sex workers who work in sex clubs. I liked the sex positive nature of the book. I couldn't stand the amount of torture in the book, especially the graphic nature of it. Parts of this were like watching Saw or Hostel. The book is very graphic in its use of both torture and depiction of sex so be warned. It's definitely not a book to read on the train. I'm not surprised at all DC decided against publishing it given its corporate overlords. The book felt very preachy as well. Like if I'm not actively advocating for everything in this book, I'm part of the problem. I don't care what you do, just leave me out of it. Received a review copy from Image and Edelweiss. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    Sex-positive adventure with a disappointingly simplistic story in a clichéd, underdeveloped dystopia. It's future America, and the moralists have taken over (religion is never explicitly mentioned) - no more sex for pleasure, and especially no more 'perversions' (anything that's not heterosexual, married, missionary position sex). A group of sex workers has created the Dirty Mind, a secret safe haven (or should that be sf hvn) for 'perverts' to live out their every sexual whim. But then the Party Sex-positive adventure with a disappointingly simplistic story in a clichéd, underdeveloped dystopia. It's future America, and the moralists have taken over (religion is never explicitly mentioned) - no more sex for pleasure, and especially no more 'perversions' (anything that's not heterosexual, married, missionary position sex). A group of sex workers has created the Dirty Mind, a secret safe haven (or should that be sf hvn) for 'perverts' to live out their every sexual whim. But then the Party (that's the moralists) crack down on the Dirty Mind and one of the owners is taken away and/or killed. Can the remaining group avenge their leader, free their friends and in general kick the Party in the groin? To start with, I love that the book presents sex workers as people not only doing a job, but people who love doing that job. The whole sex-positive message is to be celebrated. That said, the story, characters and world are sorely lacking. The dystopian world feels simplistic, it's underdeveloped and therefore unconvincing. The characters are flat, and fall back too much on empty sex-positive sloganeering. This was originally 7 issues, and it shows - it draaags halfway through, there's a lot of wheelspinning. The art is done by three different artists, and generally is okay, till the last half of the book, when it dips in quality. In short: love the message, disappointed by the execution. (Received an ARC from Image through Edelweiss)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Morgan M. Page

    Tina Horn gives us all the best of science-fiction here, following the logical conclusion of current laws, events, and technologies to deliver a politically-relevant near-future sexual dystopia that should make all of our blood run cold. It's no mistake that one of the best vantage points to view the coming technocapitalist hellscape is from some of capitalism's original discontents: sex workers, queers, and leatherpeople. Horn manages to avoid falling into a trap of being overly didactic by pop Tina Horn gives us all the best of science-fiction here, following the logical conclusion of current laws, events, and technologies to deliver a politically-relevant near-future sexual dystopia that should make all of our blood run cold. It's no mistake that one of the best vantage points to view the coming technocapitalist hellscape is from some of capitalism's original discontents: sex workers, queers, and leatherpeople. Horn manages to avoid falling into a trap of being overly didactic by populating her San Francisco with vibrant characters whose decisions are shaped by all-too-real motivations. Really, SFSX is what I wish all of the middle class white feminists who show up to all the protests in Handmaids Tale cosplay would read. As Horn demonstrates in a way Atwood never will, it is and always has been the hookers and queers and women of colour who face the brunt of violent sexual repression - and it is these same outcasts who will and always have been the ones to rise up against it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    L. McCoy

    WARNING: THIS REVIEW CONTAINS STRONG LANGUAGE, POLITICS AND SEXUAL DISCUSSION. IF ANY OF THESE OFFEND YOU DON’T READ THIS BOOK OR MY REVIEW! “You are under arrest for self-objectification, deviance, exploitation, pandering and perverting others against God’s law.” I wouldn’t have thought that sex would be a great theme for a dystopian story... but holy fuck, it works. What’s it about? This story takes place after an authoritarian rule known as The Party has taken over. The Party is very strict reg WARNING: THIS REVIEW CONTAINS STRONG LANGUAGE, POLITICS AND SEXUAL DISCUSSION. IF ANY OF THESE OFFEND YOU DON’T READ THIS BOOK OR MY REVIEW! “You are under arrest for self-objectification, deviance, exploitation, pandering and perverting others against God’s law.” I wouldn’t have thought that sex would be a great theme for a dystopian story... but holy fuck, it works. What’s it about? This story takes place after an authoritarian rule known as The Party has taken over. The Party is very strict regarding many things including sex. One thing leads to another and the main character’s husband is sent to The Pleasure Center where The Party is trying to make him more pure by torturing him in disturbing, dirty ways. Now it’s up to a rebel band of sex workers to use their unique skills to break him out and destroy The Party’s dystopian rule. Pros: The story is very interesting and creative. It’s surprisingly believable the way many of these things happen. I also found it quite unique the way this book mixes sexual themes and political dystopian themes. The artwork. At first I wasn’t sure if I would like it but it ended up working surprisingly well. The characters are well written and interesting. This story is very intense throughout. Lots of action (and not just referring to “action” kinda action). There’s a bit of comic relief that works well in brief moments. This book is not as predictable as I had slightly expected it to be. This book is surprisingly emotional many times throughout with the relationships between characters. This book is very political and the commentary is done very well. Unlike many comics this is not liberal or conservative, this book attacks incels and radical feminists alike! Rather than bashing one side, this is fully anti-authoritarian and I was surprised how well subjects such as sex positivity work for that. The right wing often (not always but often) has very puritanical views on the LGBT community often claiming their identities and sexualities are “unnatural” and find any sexual tastes beyond the basics (or even without wanting children) to be an attack on “traditional and/or family values”. On the opposite end many (again, not all, but many) on the left claim that “porn is misogyny” and that men shouldn’t even express their sexual feelings towards women as it gets labeled as being part of “toxic masculinity”. Both sides seem to often agree that any artistic expression heavily involving sex such as porn, hentai or erotic literature is nothing but worthless “smut” as they shame sex workers. This shit is part of why I hate both sides, they are so sex-negative and hypocritical. While I doubt a society such as the one seen here is likely to become reality anytime soon, it works as a great vehicle to show how both sides are fucked up when it comes to not only their views on sex but also the LGBT community, sexism, censorship, privacy and authoritarianism. It really made the book for me and I loved it. Cons: The dialogue is sometimes a bit iffy. The ending is a bit of a hopeless and sad note to end this first volume on. I know that there will most likely be a second volume but I couldn’t help but think “well fuck, that sucks” on the final page. So despite mostly being fairly serious, this book has a few bits that are (I think) meant to be sexy but honestly didn’t do much for me. I noticed the blurb compares this to Sunstone (a wonderful comic that I consider one of the sexiest pieces of literature) so maybe my expectations on that were too high but I don’t see the comparison. It’s surprisingly more Saw than Sunstone. I didn’t find it particularly arousing at any moment. Overall: I recently watched a 4-part documentary series about punk rock. While watching it I was thinking “gee, maybe I should find some books that have a similar edgy tone while giving authoritarianism a big middle finger through art” and unexpectedly I didn’t have to look, it was right here. While maybe missing a couple of notes IMO, SFSX is overall really good. It’s a unique, batshit insane plot that works way more than it should with a very intense tone throughout, good artwork, interesting characters and social commentary that is so fucking great at calling both sides out on their shit. Recommended. 4/5 PS- The song Fuck Authority by Pennywise is playing as I post this and that is just so fitting in multiple ways!

  5. 4 out of 5

    faith ✨

    LMAO wtf was this rtc

  6. 5 out of 5

    karli

    4/5 stars! Thank you to Edelweiss for a review copy. I loved this graphic novel! The sex worker industry is a hot political topic right now and I think this dystopian story is a metaphor for that. It was also fun, entertaining, and gripping. Excited for more volumes.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Judah Radd

    Ok, fun fact: I interviewed Tina Horn shortly after finishing these issues, so it was fun to ask her about what she was thinking when she wrote this. You can watch the interview here: https://youtu.be/xB3piuZXVys I love SFSX. Between the visceral art and the incredible levels of suspense, I was glued to it. I found the social commentary to be relevant, nuanced and fresh. It did not feel preachy, even though it clearly had an agenda. Issue #5 might give you a heart attack. Pure, unadulterated suspe Ok, fun fact: I interviewed Tina Horn shortly after finishing these issues, so it was fun to ask her about what she was thinking when she wrote this. You can watch the interview here: https://youtu.be/xB3piuZXVys I love SFSX. Between the visceral art and the incredible levels of suspense, I was glued to it. I found the social commentary to be relevant, nuanced and fresh. It did not feel preachy, even though it clearly had an agenda. Issue #5 might give you a heart attack. Pure, unadulterated suspense. Also, the villain is terrifying. This is good shit! PS; if you enjoy the interview, like/subscribe so we can continue to regale you with fascinating creator interviews!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    In the all-too-near future, the scrubbing-clean of San Francisco has accelerated; it's no longer just capitalism getting rid of everything insufficiently whitebread, but moralism too, as the grip on American life of the Party tightens. At first I thought, oh, and we can guess which Party that might be, but this is one of the clever things about SFSX – it's picked up on the weasel words and unholy alliances the forces of repression will use. So just as in the late twentieth century the Andrea Dwo In the all-too-near future, the scrubbing-clean of San Francisco has accelerated; it's no longer just capitalism getting rid of everything insufficiently whitebread, but moralism too, as the grip on American life of the Party tightens. At first I thought, oh, and we can guess which Party that might be, but this is one of the clever things about SFSX – it's picked up on the weasel words and unholy alliances the forces of repression will use. So just as in the late twentieth century the Andrea Dworkins and the Mary Whitehouses found common cause in a hatred of pornography (a term to which they were of course happy to apply some of their own extreme stretching), the Party rhetoric here draws on ostensibly leftwing TERFery and SWERFery and general Anti-Sex League bullshit as well as straightforward rightwing censoriousness when it talks about saving the young from 'exploitation'. The story it sets within that? Well, that's a fairly standard dystopian thriller, most of whose beats you can see coming ahead of time: a sexy underground, a lead who thought she'd left it behind for a normal life, a former leader of it twisted into a prominent agent of the evil forces. Think Star Wars with skimpier outfits, and sex toys replacing the lightsabers, and you won't be too far off. What makes it work is the attention to detail which renders the ride so convincing, not just as regards the Party, but in terms of the brittleness outsider scenes display when the external pressure starts to show, or the way a well-off fan can be at once a bother and a godsend for a niche performer. Writer Tina Horn knows this stuff, being a comics newcomer but a veteran sex educator*; other work includes a podcast called Why Are People Into That?!, and accordingly this is a bit of an anomaly among sex-centric comics. Often, they can leave the reader with a very good idea of the creators' own kinks – not that there's anything wrong with that, of course. Whereas here, there's a real care taken to show the breadth of the activities underway at the Dirty Mind, not all of which will be for any individual, but all of which have their devotees – and, of course, their shared enemies. *Though one whose website really needs updating, given it still lists this series as forthcoming from Vertigo. There is, of course, a life-mirroring-art-mirroring-life angle here, because SFSX was a victim of the creeping prudery it depicts. Originally promoted as a Vertigo series, part of their last, doomed relaunch, it was always going to get shredded at an increasingly risk-averse DC, and I'm glad we didn't have to make do with the toned-down version we'd have got there. Instead, after Batman's willy caused sufficient panic amid the upper echelons that the whole Vertigo imprint was among the collateral damage, it's found a new and much more suitable home at Image, and thank goodness (not to mention the good sort of badness) for that. (Edelweiss ARC) ----

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rick Brose

    There was a lot I liked about this book. The cast felt diverse and real. Sex, sexuality, and gender were on display in all their intricacies. And despite not spelling out a lot, the world and its political system was intriguing. This comic is graphic, both in sexual content and violence. That will undoubtedly make this one not for everyone. But if you do not mind that kind of content, then the honest look at sex and the real way it is threatened by society is a compelling and well told story.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    This had everything I like about dystopian fiction. The future is plausible enough to be terrifying, and there's a clear need for justice. Really excellent work. The art is fantastic, as are the colors. It's so rare to find a comic where the female characters aren't subject to the male gaze, and I really appreciated the validation of sex workers as actual people instead of plot devices or props, as they are in so many other comics. I received a free eGalley from Edelweiss for review purposes.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dessa

    I don’t know about you, but “sex workers take down a fascist conservative government” is exactly the narrative I need right now.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    This book in a nutshell: *read as single issues This book in a nutshell: *read as single issues

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bernie Gourley

    This is “The Handmaid’s Tale” meets “Ocean’s Eleven.” Well, admittedly, that’s a concise pitch-line offering more confusion than information value. Allow me to clarify. This series is set in a dystopia in which morality and sexuality are controlled by the state, and efforts are underway to eliminate any “deviant” sexual activity (i.e. any sexual activity not involving a heterosexual married couple having vaginal intercourse – preferably with a strong procreative intent.) Within that world, it’s This is “The Handmaid’s Tale” meets “Ocean’s Eleven.” Well, admittedly, that’s a concise pitch-line offering more confusion than information value. Allow me to clarify. This series is set in a dystopia in which morality and sexuality are controlled by the state, and efforts are underway to eliminate any “deviant” sexual activity (i.e. any sexual activity not involving a heterosexual married couple having vaginal intercourse – preferably with a strong procreative intent.) Within that world, it’s a heist story. [Some might argue that it’s more a prison break, but because it involves people breaking into a secured facility in order to get others out, I stand by my descriptor. That said, it really combines the two because one of the prisoner’s takes agency to affect escape] The story’s protagonist is a woman named Avory. She once worked a giant sex club / dungeon called “The Dirty Mind” before “the Party” [the conservative guardians of morality] consolidated control. When the Party did come to power, they raided The Dirty Mind. Avory escaped with a client who she’d fallen for, the two got married, and they were trying to live “normal” lives in compliance with the new laws. When this façade falls apart, Avory goes back to her old [kinky] friends seeking help. However, she’s seen as a turncoat by them. They don’t trust her, and they decline to help her. But things change when the Party publicizes its new activities. Because of the nature of comic books / serialized graphic novels, the first thing I feel I need to say is that I found this to be a complete and satisfying story arc. This format often fails in this regard because it’s a challenge to keep an eye on an overall run arc while building that overarching story from component stories [that are truly stories.] Often the end of a volume feels like a speedbump rather than a conclusion. However, that isn’t the case here. That doesn’t mean the story is not left with someplace interesting to go. It is. However, if all one read was this volume, one would experience a self-contained story. In short, I felt Horn [and team] did a great job of balancing “leave them satisfied” with “leave them wanting more.” I also found character development to be well-done. The characters are all developed, unique, and we can see their combination of motivation and internal conflict. Flashbacks are put to good use to give the reader enough insight to see why this gulf exists between Avory and her former best friends. However, these are kept to a few panels (usually at the beginning of each issue) and so they don’t bog the story down. By this point, this probably goes without saying, but in the interest of due diligence: this book is graphically sexual. The artwork and dialogue are explicit. I won’t get into an extended philosophical discussion of whether it’s pornography or erotica. As I said, there is a story, and all of what is shown is in service to that story. That said, nothing is held-back, either. One of the book’s key points is the importance of consent as shown in the contrast between the consensual activities in the club and the “reconditioning” activities carried out by the Party. Long story short, there are some cringe-worthy scenes, at least to laity to sadomasochism. So, if you are sensitive to such matters or are purchasing this for someone who is, buyer beware. I found the story gripping and also thought-provoking. If you are not averse to graphic sexual content, I’d highly recommend it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Gretel

    SFSX is a dystopia and the answer to the question: "What happens when TERFs and SWERFs are successful in their collaboration with Christian fundamentalists, right wing conservatives and Nazis?" We already know that exclusionary feminism is an extension of the patriarchy and the bastardisation of feminism to suit conservative ideas of purity, "correct" gender/sex identity and the subjugation of women, queers and BIPOC. With Polish conservatives claiming "LGBQT+-free zones", the torture camps in Che SFSX is a dystopia and the answer to the question: "What happens when TERFs and SWERFs are successful in their collaboration with Christian fundamentalists, right wing conservatives and Nazis?" We already know that exclusionary feminism is an extension of the patriarchy and the bastardisation of feminism to suit conservative ideas of purity, "correct" gender/sex identity and the subjugation of women, queers and BIPOC. With Polish conservatives claiming "LGBQT+-free zones", the torture camps in Chechnya, the errosion of gender equality and LGBQT+ protection, the further criminalisation of sex work and the rising of fascism the dystopia presented in this graphic novel is not a hypothesis but based on historical facts and a fictional version of what is to come should we lose the fight for our rights. The graphic novel starts in a sex club called Dirty Minds, where people meet to have safe and consesual sex and kink sessions of all kinds. But the US in under control of right-wing conservative Christians and TERFs/SWERFs who see consensual (but kinky) pleasure and queer identities as impure. The sex club is raided and the protagonists scattered or arrested. The story follows Avery's life. She manages to create a "normal" life with her husband under constant surveillance of the state and the Party (yes, capitalised). Until her husband sees something he shouldn't and he gets arrested. Avery narrowly escapes the fascist police and seeks refuge with her old friends. Can they safe her husband from the Party's torture camp? It's always tough to say that you enjoyed something that depicts the grim consequences of what is currently happening. But the message resonates and it reminds the reader that we are not alone in this fight and that giving up or losing is not an option. I really like the drawing style(s), it really fits the story and ideals. It's punky and full of bright colours and definitely is Cyberpunk in it's style and message. The sex positivity and diversity is incredible and I love embracing, supportive and loving the relationships are. I guess the last thing I have to say is: TERFs and SWERFs are fascists masquerading as feminists. They promote deeply disturbing Christian fundamentalist and White supremacist ideas of identity, sexuality and gender. Fuck TERFs. Fuck SWERFs. Fuck fascists. Wear bright hot pink and deep purple lipstick or none at all. Make colourful art with make-up. Have fun, safe and consensual sex with whomever you like or don't have sex. Be kinky, stay gay. Wear whatever you like, no matter if you cover every inch of your skin or if you want to wear the skimpiest of outfits. Wear your hair long or short, shaved or braided. Dye it blue, green or orange or be natural. Shave or don't. I don't care. It's your body. Just be you.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Matt Graupman

    In a post-apocalyptic future, it’ll be the sex workers that save us, of course. At this point, it’s almost a cliche, am I right? Okay, maybe not. But in provocateur Tina Horn’s lurid “SFSX, Volume 1: Protection” humanity’s salvation comes at the hands (and mouths and other body parts) of a ragtag group of queers, prostitutes, porn stars, transgender people, and their allies. Obviously, there’s a lot to unpack (pun intended?) with “SFSX,” and it’s not going to be a series for everyone (or even mo In a post-apocalyptic future, it’ll be the sex workers that save us, of course. At this point, it’s almost a cliche, am I right? Okay, maybe not. But in provocateur Tina Horn’s lurid “SFSX, Volume 1: Protection” humanity’s salvation comes at the hands (and mouths and other body parts) of a ragtag group of queers, prostitutes, porn stars, transgender people, and their allies. Obviously, there’s a lot to unpack (pun intended?) with “SFSX,” and it’s not going to be a series for everyone (or even most people), but I found the book to be extremely thought-provoking, wildly imaginative, and thrillingly violent. In the not-too-distant-future America of “SFSX,” the country has overcorrected back to its fanatically puritanical roots, overseen by a conglomerate of conservative fringe groups. Sexuality is strictly controlled with citizens monitored via their Purity Scores and all things deviant - i.e. anything that’s outside the scope of a man and woman procreating - are outlawed. The uninhibited and marginalized are forced to take their behaviors underground, that is until a legendary director and performer recruits some of her friends to help rescue her husband from the tortures of a re-education camp. Mixing sci-fi, action, and erotica, “SFSX” is kinky and captivating, like a porno version of “Blade Runner.” A noted dominatrix and lecturer on sexuality, Horn certainly knows her stuff and “SFSX” allows her to explore the different facets of what adults enjoy doing with and to one another behind closed doors, be it pleasure or pain or a mixture of both. Furthermore, for a comic with no small amount of genital abuse, there’s a surprising amount of tenderness to some of the scenes. In these polarizing times, it’s hard to ignore the identity politics that underlie “SFSX,” especially when a changing Supreme Court makes a situation like the one in the book seem ever more plausible but that’s the point. Horn obviously wants to push some buttons and this series does that. Big time. It’ll turn off some readers but I think it’ll also make some readers do a little soul-searching. On an artistic level, “SFSX” is a visceral thrill ride, courtesy of gritty art by Michael Dowling & Jen Hickman, with liquid-y guest art by Alejandra Gutierrez (she’s the reason I bought the book in the first place). A comic series this outrageous but potentially prescient requires all the collaborators to be at the top of their game and these creators bring it. American comics have come a looooong way. It really wasn’t that far back when the Comics Code was stripping any sort of objectionable content out of funny books and nowadays one of the big publishers (Image) has a book where fisting, BDSM, stabbings, and nudity are commonplace. “SFSX” is a wild, wild comic book for a wild, wild crossroads in history.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Quite eye-opening, I think this comic should be very well received by those on board with it. In a near-future America, San Francisco has been taken over by some new puritans, who have decided that the biggest thing wrong with society is porn, and the attendant demand on the male ego to match up, or to demand the implausible of the average woman. They've purloined the state's biggest whore house and swingers club for their headquarters, where they're trying to dissuade people from all but the mo Quite eye-opening, I think this comic should be very well received by those on board with it. In a near-future America, San Francisco has been taken over by some new puritans, who have decided that the biggest thing wrong with society is porn, and the attendant demand on the male ego to match up, or to demand the implausible of the average woman. They've purloined the state's biggest whore house and swingers club for their headquarters, where they're trying to dissuade people from all but the most vanilla, procreation-and-nothing-else, kind of sex life. Our heroine used to be one of the biggest video makers and lash-users in the club, but is now trying to get work there amongst the puritans, joining her husband there to earn enough to move away (what has prevented those in power reaching all America is not discussed). But when he stumbles on what he should not be privy to, the couple are separated – and she'll do whatever it takes to rescue her husband. As will, ultimately, her sex worker colleagues, when they finally find the truth about their prior madam… Several things. You could say the facial recording stuff is needed for the state monitoring of sexuality, and you could also say it's intrusive in making this a more rarefied world than the one we live in. I'm not sure the sci-fi was ultimately needed, for the near-reality of this scenario is certainly strong enough. It convinces with the ideas of those in power, and their success based on what they say is a more egalitarian life is believable. People have picked up on the artwork, and the aesthetic of the book not being the greatest – well, since when did the majority of porn look perfect and ideal? It could always be better (the artwork here, I mean, not porn) but it was in keeping with the ambience of the piece for me. If anything knocked points off the book for me it was the looseness in the final drama, where I failed to get a great sense of the geography of the heist, and the splitting up of the people, looking different to how they were drawn earlier on, made it hard to keep track of who's who. But I think this has to be called a success – it's entertaining, even if you don't agree with me that it's plausible and though-provoking. It's not gratuitous or titillating, but a good, strong mature read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    *Thank you Edelweiss+ for allowing me to read this in exchange for a honest and unbiased review* Hello Fellow Readers, So today I bring to you a band of unconventional heroes, that really turned the preconceived notion of her on it's head and I loved that! The heroes in this didn't have to be 'Pretty Woman' so we can see how good they are, and I loved that they are just people who are trying to live their lives with the freedom we say there is. First off, while Avory seems to be the central poin *Thank you Edelweiss+ for allowing me to read this in exchange for a honest and unbiased review* Hello Fellow Readers, So today I bring to you a band of unconventional heroes, that really turned the preconceived notion of her on it's head and I loved that! The heroes in this didn't have to be 'Pretty Woman' so we can see how good they are, and I loved that they are just people who are trying to live their lives with the freedom we say there is. First off, while Avory seems to be the central point character of the story she wasn't my favorite. This doesn;t mean I didn't like Avory, she's driven, strong, and pretty badass but I noticed that unless it is something that directly affects her (or George) her fire suddenly disappears. This is why Casey was my favorite. She seems to be the real driving force behind this group of rag-tag sex workers. When needed she steps up and reminds the others exactly why they are doing this. To me she's the heart of the group. I do wish we got to explore her character more, as I feel we didn't really get too much information during the flashbacks. Sylvia was a absolute legend, if I call Casey the heart than Sylvia would be the head. I really felt her pain regarding Jones, and I love that despite being put in positions that could break her she instead can push it all aside and really do what's right. Nick and Denis were great too but we don't really get too much from them, which saddens me because of *Spoilers*. Denis did have a really cool scene in which we could tell they are pretty kick-ass. I really love the representation in this comic, and the inclusion of a non-binary character which we don't see too often. As far as the story went it was pretty interesting, but I hope we see how exactly The Party came into power, and who the real villains are. Also, all the artwork was AMAZING. It colors of each scene, and the way you can feel the emotions coming off the characters were great. Each artist had different styles so it was great to see the story told in different ways. Overall this was a wild ride and I can't wait to see where they go with this!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    SFSX follows Avory, formerly Simona Salicious of The Dirty Mind before it was replaced by the government’s Pleasure Centre. The latter monitors and “corrects” people’s sexuality and sexual behaviour. For Avory, and her co-sex-workers at the Dirty Mind, they have lost their livelihood, and passion. When Avory’s husband is kidnapped for “corrections,” the Dirty Mind squad teams up to find him and their former leader. I really liked the representation in this story - about half of our main characte SFSX follows Avory, formerly Simona Salicious of The Dirty Mind before it was replaced by the government’s Pleasure Centre. The latter monitors and “corrects” people’s sexuality and sexual behaviour. For Avory, and her co-sex-workers at the Dirty Mind, they have lost their livelihood, and passion. When Avory’s husband is kidnapped for “corrections,” the Dirty Mind squad teams up to find him and their former leader. I really liked the representation in this story - about half of our main characters are POC, which is pretty decent considering a lot of comics don’t bother including POC at all, let alone introducing them as main characters. One of the leads is non-binary, which was refreshing to see since enbys don’t get much representation in media. I really liked that the main characters are just matter-of-factly sex workers. I appreciate Tina Horn avoiding the whole “stripper with a heart of gold" trope, or narrowing in on how sex work is "not feminist" or inherently bad or good or anything. These characters are sex workers for different, and realistic reasons and I kind of like that Horn doesn't focus on their backstories. There’s no discussion of “how empowering it is” to be a sex worker, which also was appreciated. This story is just about sex workers being tough and compassionate, trying to normalize safe sex, whatever your kink. There were a few conversations in the story that felt poignant, empathetic, and well-written. Especially in regards to sexual identity. Overall, I think this series has a lot of potential and I'm really looking forward to seeing what's next for our characters.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Robert Bussie

    This book is like an Orwellian Society mixed with the movie A Clockwork Orange. The government is controlling what society considers normal sexual behavior. This story has a great premise but the end product falls flat. The rights of sex workers and individuals to enjoy the fetishes that turn them on is a hot topic in today's society. I am not a prude nor I am against people enjoying their kink. I like to think that I am open minded in this area. So, I was looking forward to reading this book, ho This book is like an Orwellian Society mixed with the movie A Clockwork Orange. The government is controlling what society considers normal sexual behavior. This story has a great premise but the end product falls flat. The rights of sex workers and individuals to enjoy the fetishes that turn them on is a hot topic in today's society. I am not a prude nor I am against people enjoying their kink. I like to think that I am open minded in this area. So, I was looking forward to reading this book, however this book is a dull story that is not well developed. There is two issues that I have with this book. First issue are the characters. The are one dimensional. They are only defined by their sex jobs and what turns them on and that's it. It would have really helped the story to learn more about them. It would have made them seem more human instead of acting like human sex toys. It is hard to care about their cause when they are not interesting or likable. The second issue is the art work. It is extremely ugly with flat colors. Nudity and sex does not bother me in art work. The human body is beautiful and having sex and orgasms can be a beautiful subject in art. But when it is drawn and colored this terrible it makes the subject come off as being miserable. If you are looking to learn more about the lives of people in the fetish society I can easily and highly recommend Stejpan Sejic's brilliant Sunstone series. It shows that the BDSM culture can be brought to graphic novel format with interesting multidimensional characters.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tasya Dita

    I received an eARC through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Trigger warning: explicit sex and nudity, torture, sexism, racism SFSX is set in the near future where a puritan party has take control of America and policing people sex behaviour. Our protagonists are a group of sex workers who worked together in the Dirty Mind, but when the place was raided, some stay in the world while others “conform” to the Party. Years later, they reunited and put their differences aside to infiltrate th I received an eARC through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Trigger warning: explicit sex and nudity, torture, sexism, racism SFSX is set in the near future where a puritan party has take control of America and policing people sex behaviour. Our protagonists are a group of sex workers who worked together in the Dirty Mind, but when the place was raided, some stay in the world while others “conform” to the Party. Years later, they reunited and put their differences aside to infiltrate the Party’s Pleasure Center and free their captured and brainwashed friends. This book is very sex positive, the Dirty Mind being a haven for sex of any kind and our protagonists talking about sex as something empowering, but it also emphasizes on consent and getting checked. However this book is also very graphic; there were many explicit depiction of sex and torture so be warned, because it took me by surprise in the first few pages and made me almost DNF it 😶 I’m glad I didn’t though because aside from the graphic nature of the book, I really enjoyed it! The pacing was fast, the stakes were high, and the action was thrilling. I mean, we got Avory stabbing someone with a stiletto within the first chapter! The plot was also full of twists and turn, the ending was totally unexpected. This might be the most mature graphic novel I’ve ever read and it’s worth the read!

  21. 5 out of 5

    USOM

    SFSX is a dystopia about what would happen if forces of purity control took over and sexuality is bureaucratized and policed. It revolves around a group of queer sex workers who are trying to bring back their friends and feel free to express their sexuality. It's incredibly sex positive and I loved seeing that representation on the page. I was intrigued by the Sunstone comparison and I think, in this way, they are similar in their explorations of kink. It feels very bleak, especially as we witne SFSX is a dystopia about what would happen if forces of purity control took over and sexuality is bureaucratized and policed. It revolves around a group of queer sex workers who are trying to bring back their friends and feel free to express their sexuality. It's incredibly sex positive and I loved seeing that representation on the page. I was intrigued by the Sunstone comparison and I think, in this way, they are similar in their explorations of kink. It feels very bleak, especially as we witness good characters who are taken away by the system. In some ways, certain elements feel a little reductive, but the world building is supposed to be this hyper dystopian setting. The main draw for me was the sex positivity told in a dystopian landscape, and as a dystopian setting it felt pretty standard, but I didn't have a problem with that. I think it's so important to see queer women on the pages, sex workers who enjoy the work as well, people celebrating their sexuality, and women portrayed who feel genuine and not objectified. The action felt fast paced and you definitely want to root for them to take the whole system down. In that way the dystopia feels well executed because you definitely want our protagonists to win!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    In a dystopian future where a new puritan Party have outlawed pornography and pleasure sex, a group of kinky queer sex workers rise up to save their loves and their freedom. SFSX is a pretty typical dystopian story, with an atypical focus on kink and sex work. The decision to make the antagonist a self-proclaimed feminist is particularly genius, as the rise of purity culture within feminist spaces threatens to prohibit the production of erotica and criminalize sex work in the name of women’s libe In a dystopian future where a new puritan Party have outlawed pornography and pleasure sex, a group of kinky queer sex workers rise up to save their loves and their freedom. SFSX is a pretty typical dystopian story, with an atypical focus on kink and sex work. The decision to make the antagonist a self-proclaimed feminist is particularly genius, as the rise of purity culture within feminist spaces threatens to prohibit the production of erotica and criminalize sex work in the name of women’s liberation. This isn’t an “us-versus-them” topic, this is a conversation that is happening within circles of people who all call themselves “feminist.” That said, I don’t think this story went as deep as it could have, and the time spent showing sex acts on the page could have been better spent developing the world, characters, and themes. Still, SFSX has an intriguing concept, and an interesting-enough storyline, and I appreciate the diverse cast of characters. TW: on-page explicit kinky sex, reference to kink, forced institutionalization, torture, corrective rape Thank you so much to the publisher for providing me with this eARC via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Harper Jean

    A bracing but ultimately hopeful and frequently delightful dystopian heist story that also breaks ground in depictions of sex worker and BDSM/kink communities in comics. Author Tina Horn, distinguished for her podcasting, journalism, books, columns, and activism on the lives and rights of sex workers and all corners of sexuality, assembles a crack team of artists and shows herself to be no slouch as a story-spinner. Comparisons to the Handmaid's Tale are unavoidable - imagine if the Gilead junta A bracing but ultimately hopeful and frequently delightful dystopian heist story that also breaks ground in depictions of sex worker and BDSM/kink communities in comics. Author Tina Horn, distinguished for her podcasting, journalism, books, columns, and activism on the lives and rights of sex workers and all corners of sexuality, assembles a crack team of artists and shows herself to be no slouch as a story-spinner. Comparisons to the Handmaid's Tale are unavoidable - imagine if the Gilead junta had relied on allying itself with incels and the reactionary TERF/SWERF wing of second-wave feminism - but the cover copy's comparisons to Ocean's 8 and Sex Criminals are equally apt, with an underground chosen family-cum-resistance cell of self-described queer, whores, sluts, and perverts taking on the state. Yes, it is sexually explicit. It also graphically - and effectively - contrasts kinky "torture" with very real state torture. While there are fleeting moments of heavy-handedness, I found it overwhelmingly to be a heartful, sometimes insightful, and life-giving read, pausing my page-turning only to skip through author Tina Horn's mind-boggling SFSX playlists on Spotify (one song for each of 154 pages!).

  24. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

    I want to read this based on the cover and premise. The whole time I was reading, I was getting total "Saga" vibes. No, SFSX isn't a space opera, but they both have themes of found family, dystopian rule, oppression, and controlling who people should live and who they should love. Plus, some of the chapters were very similar to Fiona Staples' art style. I loved SFSX's queer representation. Almost all colors of the rainbow were represented: Trans, Non-Binary (using They/Them pronouns!), Lesbian, B I want to read this based on the cover and premise. The whole time I was reading, I was getting total "Saga" vibes. No, SFSX isn't a space opera, but they both have themes of found family, dystopian rule, oppression, and controlling who people should live and who they should love. Plus, some of the chapters were very similar to Fiona Staples' art style. I loved SFSX's queer representation. Almost all colors of the rainbow were represented: Trans, Non-Binary (using They/Them pronouns!), Lesbian, Bisexual, Gay. All of the letters. And I loved how diverse the cast was. The society in the book definitely reflects our current and not-so-distant future. Our bodies are already being policed, anyone that isn't white, straight, cis, or vanilla sex are already demonized. Incel men are running/ruining things, feeling entitled to sex just because. Certain women shitting all over what feminism is supposed to be. While I liked all of the above, like other reviewers, about the overall plot was a bit meh. I felt like it was screaming 'Queer POC and sex workers are here to save us!' But I'm not sure if it should be on their shoulders to do so. SFSX ARC was provided by Image through Edelwiess for an honest review.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Daniplx

    3 stars to this gritty, NSFW, dystopian graphic novel. This book isn't for the faint of heart - the depictions of sex and violence are graphic, so just a warning. Something I loved about this book is the positive depiction of sex, sex workers and LGBTQ people - more books/comics like this please! I loved the premise of this story - a group of sex workers band together to help take down an extremely puritanical government that controls everything down to with who and what kind of sex a person can ha 3 stars to this gritty, NSFW, dystopian graphic novel. This book isn't for the faint of heart - the depictions of sex and violence are graphic, so just a warning. Something I loved about this book is the positive depiction of sex, sex workers and LGBTQ people - more books/comics like this please! I loved the premise of this story - a group of sex workers band together to help take down an extremely puritanical government that controls everything down to with who and what kind of sex a person can have. The execution just kind of fell flat for me at the end, both in art and story. There were multiple different artists illustrating this collection (I'm assuming it was a different artist for each individual issue) and I am personally not a fan when there are different art styles within one story, as I find it jarring to the flow of the story. The ending also seemed a bit rushed - I wished it had been a bit more drawn out, with a bit more character development/background, but I also understand it was meant to continue, so hopefully it will. Overall though, I quite enjoyed it: it was different, dark, slightly relevant (in a Handmaids Tale kind of way) and it kept me reading. I will also keep my eye out for a continuation to this story, because I do want to know what is going to happen next.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Paul Decker

    *I received this book as an eARC from Image Comics via Edelweiss. I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.* Obviously, this graphic novel is for adults. There is sex in it. It's super sex positive and I love it! This is a modern story about a near future dystopia. A corrupt theocracy using feminism against sexual liberation. An awesome group of heroes tries to fight back.The villains feel so real. The world building is done so well that I *I received this book as an eARC from Image Comics via Edelweiss. I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.* Obviously, this graphic novel is for adults. There is sex in it. It's super sex positive and I love it! This is a modern story about a near future dystopia. A corrupt theocracy using feminism against sexual liberation. An awesome group of heroes tries to fight back.The villains feel so real. The world building is done so well that I could see this as a potential future. which is scary. Even the vocabulary the villains use makes it reasonable that they believe their side of things. This is an excellent sex-positive graphic novel. I give this book a 5/5.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tonya

    I am not a regular reader of comics. I've read a few titles in the past, but I'm not great at keeping up with things. But when Tina Horn announced she was creating and writing a comic, I was sooooooo all about it! Because I'm not a collector, I had to wait for the trade paperback collection. I preordered on the first day it was available, was supposed to have it last month, but didn't get it until today. HOLY FUCKING WOW was it worth the wait! It is SOOOOOOO FUCKING GOOD! The dystopian story shoul I am not a regular reader of comics. I've read a few titles in the past, but I'm not great at keeping up with things. But when Tina Horn announced she was creating and writing a comic, I was sooooooo all about it! Because I'm not a collector, I had to wait for the trade paperback collection. I preordered on the first day it was available, was supposed to have it last month, but didn't get it until today. HOLY FUCKING WOW was it worth the wait! It is SOOOOOOO FUCKING GOOD! The dystopian story should feel so fictitious, but in today's world it's incredibly timely and relevant. The art is amazing on every page. And it's an absolutely compelling page turner! I don't know how I can wait for more!

  28. 4 out of 5

    kendraahampton

    This comic is a celebration of sex workers and I enjoyed every bit of the story line, as it was action packed and fast past. My only issue and, it’s unfortunate because this is a comic, is the art style. Two of the main characters were almost identical and I could only tell them apart from their hair style. They were both Black women which only feeds into the whole “all Black people look alike” assumption. The artist needs to do better in future issues. Furthermore, the style as a whole just see This comic is a celebration of sex workers and I enjoyed every bit of the story line, as it was action packed and fast past. My only issue and, it’s unfortunate because this is a comic, is the art style. Two of the main characters were almost identical and I could only tell them apart from their hair style. They were both Black women which only feeds into the whole “all Black people look alike” assumption. The artist needs to do better in future issues. Furthermore, the style as a whole just seemed rough drafty as opposed to final. This could all be personal preference, but I’ve seen some amazing comic drawings and this just cannot compare. Nonetheless, if you can get past the artwork like I had to, this is a great story and I’d recommended.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Gloria

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I'm not a graphic novel person really, so probably a lot of genre stuff is lost on me. I thought this queer sex/ totalitarian purity dystopia was a bit thin, especially in terms of the dialogue, which is mainly just expository (but I realise you need a bit of that). What I liked was the variety of artists, the thread of badass sex worker superheros, the fact that characters are trans/nb without that being The Issue or The Story, and the fact it doesn't have a happy ending, but it does feel real.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    This. Was. Awesome. It reminded me a lot of Bitch Planet. The art is fairly simple, gritty, but gets the point across. Issue 4 was the weakest but was needed to continue the storyline. I was invested in the characters stories. I wanted the main character to win. I NEED the next volume. 4.5 stars. ARC provided by the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.

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