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When a local's troubling death is linked to a Russian oligarch and his multinational conglomerate, Bruno faces one of his toughest cases yet, one that brings together a French notary and a rock star--and, of course, Bergerac red and white. It's summer in the Dordogne. The heirs of a Périgordian sheep farmer learn that they have been disinherited, and their father's estate s When a local's troubling death is linked to a Russian oligarch and his multinational conglomerate, Bruno faces one of his toughest cases yet, one that brings together a French notary and a rock star--and, of course, Bergerac red and white. It's summer in the Dordogne. The heirs of a Périgordian sheep farmer learn that they have been disinherited, and their father's estate sold to an insurance company in return for a policy that will place him in a five-star retirement home for the rest of his life. But the farmer never gets his life of luxury--he dies before moving in. Was it a natural death? Was there foul play? Bruno begins the investigation that leads him to several shadowy insurance companies owned by a Russian oligarch with a Cypriot passport. The companies are based in Cyprus, Malta, and Luxembourg, but Bruno finds a weak spot in France: the Russian's France-based notaire and insurance agent. As Bruno is pursuing this lead, the oligarch's daughter turns up in the Périgord, and complications ensue, eventually bringing the action to the château of an aging rock star. But, as ever, Bruno makes time for lunch amid it all.


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When a local's troubling death is linked to a Russian oligarch and his multinational conglomerate, Bruno faces one of his toughest cases yet, one that brings together a French notary and a rock star--and, of course, Bergerac red and white. It's summer in the Dordogne. The heirs of a Périgordian sheep farmer learn that they have been disinherited, and their father's estate s When a local's troubling death is linked to a Russian oligarch and his multinational conglomerate, Bruno faces one of his toughest cases yet, one that brings together a French notary and a rock star--and, of course, Bergerac red and white. It's summer in the Dordogne. The heirs of a Périgordian sheep farmer learn that they have been disinherited, and their father's estate sold to an insurance company in return for a policy that will place him in a five-star retirement home for the rest of his life. But the farmer never gets his life of luxury--he dies before moving in. Was it a natural death? Was there foul play? Bruno begins the investigation that leads him to several shadowy insurance companies owned by a Russian oligarch with a Cypriot passport. The companies are based in Cyprus, Malta, and Luxembourg, but Bruno finds a weak spot in France: the Russian's France-based notaire and insurance agent. As Bruno is pursuing this lead, the oligarch's daughter turns up in the Périgord, and complications ensue, eventually bringing the action to the château of an aging rock star. But, as ever, Bruno makes time for lunch amid it all.

30 review for The Shooting at Chateau Rock

  1. 4 out of 5

    The Library Lady

    I feel as if Walker is beginning to lose me. Instead of tearing through this book in an hour or two, I read it languidly, between reading other books. How many times can we watch Bruno take a horseback ride with Pamela and company? How many times can we observe him cook a meal, or buy something savory at the market, or eat at a local restaurant? There is almost never any plot significance in these scenes, and there isn't even much variety to them. More importantly, how many times are we going to ha I feel as if Walker is beginning to lose me. Instead of tearing through this book in an hour or two, I read it languidly, between reading other books. How many times can we watch Bruno take a horseback ride with Pamela and company? How many times can we observe him cook a meal, or buy something savory at the market, or eat at a local restaurant? There is almost never any plot significance in these scenes, and there isn't even much variety to them. More importantly, how many times are we going to have to see Bruno have a "tryst" with Isabelle that ends with "we love each other but it'll never work." This one is particularly weird because it involves Bruno's basset hound Balzac getting to meet a nice lady basset hound.Do we really need the details of how dogs do it? Mon Dieu! Oy vey iz mir! Florence, the nice lady with 2 kids who is probably intended to SOMEDAY become Bruno's love interest gets very little page time here, BTW. Oh, yeah, the mystery. It starts out as a main focus but gets lost in flurry of aging rock stars, Russian oligarchs and international intrigue, because Walker wants to show off all his background from his cool connections, and brags about them in the afterward. Desole, M. Walker ,but 13 is not a lucky number for me in terms of your books.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lou

    A Shooting at Chateau Rock is the thirteenth instalment to feature Bruno Courrèges, Chief of Police in the Dordgne town of St Denis and although preferable to have read the previous novels it isn't a necessity as they can each be picked up and enjoyed as standalones without issue. This is a real treat to read and exceptionally thought out. Shortly after local famer Driant’s untimely demise, seemingly from a heart attack, his son Gaston contacts Bruno Courrèges in an angry and confused state. He A Shooting at Chateau Rock is the thirteenth instalment to feature Bruno Courrèges, Chief of Police in the Dordgne town of St Denis and although preferable to have read the previous novels it isn't a necessity as they can each be picked up and enjoyed as standalones without issue. This is a real treat to read and exceptionally thought out. Shortly after local famer Driant’s untimely demise, seemingly from a heart attack, his son Gaston contacts Bruno Courrèges in an angry and confused state. He has discovered that his father had signed over his farm to pay for his fee to stay in a luxury retirement home owned by a Russian oligarch. The money was paid to an insurance company who was to secure his place at the retirement home near Sarlat. It all seems very fishy to Bruno and Driant’s family. Elsewhere infamous rocker Rod Macrae and his wife Meghan are due to divorce and sell chateau rock to split the proceeds. When their children come to visit for the last time Jamie brings with him his Russian girlfriend who turns out to be the daughter of the oligarch who owns the retirement home... This is a cosy mystery-thriller with an edgier side to it and with the scenes from Midsomer Murders replaced by the sun and serenity of South West France. It is delightful and charming, moves at a swift pace and beautifully written. Escaping to Perigord in your mind is easy as Walker describes the region in rich, vivid detail and the inclusion of so much food makes your mouth water. It's an entertaining and light crime novel with a wonderful atmosphere and superbly crafted plot that deals with corruption, shady insurance scams and Russian oligarchs who appear to act with impunity. Being reacquainted with Bruno is like meeting up with an old friend and it's great to catch up with what is happening in his life too. The countryside and setting was described beautifully with a spot on depiction of small-town life where everyone thinks they know everyone. It addresses the topical issues of bureaucracy/red tape, insurance scams, dirty dealings, Russian oligarchs, climate change and Bruno's basset hound Balzac begins mating. Highly recommended. Many thanks to Quercus for an ARC.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    I look forward each year to getting my hands on the latest Bruno, now the 13th of a great series. This one was, as always, filled with many shared meals described tantalizingly and portraying the best of satisfying social interactions among friends. Watch for the lamb shanks recipe! The criminal challenges included investigation of the sudden death of old guy who had a taste for female company and his sudden change of his will promptly followed by his death. This develops into a far reaching consp I look forward each year to getting my hands on the latest Bruno, now the 13th of a great series. This one was, as always, filled with many shared meals described tantalizingly and portraying the best of satisfying social interactions among friends. Watch for the lamb shanks recipe! The criminal challenges included investigation of the sudden death of old guy who had a taste for female company and his sudden change of his will promptly followed by his death. This develops into a far reaching conspiracy involving the Russian factor. There is a healthy portion dedicated to music as well, a visit from Isabelle taking Balzac for his first mating experience and plenty of opportunity for Kir. What's the deal with that as the favored cocktail in Perigord region? Must be, I guess. At times I lost a tiny bit of interest in detailed cooking directions but I remain a fan of this series. Library Loan

  4. 5 out of 5

    Gerard Menses

    I have enjoyed this series and episode 13 was a relaxing read. However it was not a satisfying one. The formula dominated here; more detailed recipes, more political history, lengthy and graphic diversions into dog breeding, and colorful town characters, listed rather than developed, all at the expense of plot. The story had a much slower burn than usual arriving at, rather than building to, a preternaturally rapid denouement. Not as engaging as previous books and seemingly having the goal of te I have enjoyed this series and episode 13 was a relaxing read. However it was not a satisfying one. The formula dominated here; more detailed recipes, more political history, lengthy and graphic diversions into dog breeding, and colorful town characters, listed rather than developed, all at the expense of plot. The story had a much slower burn than usual arriving at, rather than building to, a preternaturally rapid denouement. Not as engaging as previous books and seemingly having the goal of telegraphing domestic scale events to come. Still, a pleasant fantasy village to escape to, though lacking the delight it once held.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Julie Durnell

    Always a pleasure to catch up with Bruno and the rest of his friends, and dine vicariously at their table, filling up with homegrown vegetables and fruit, delicious French pastries and wonderful wines. I particularly enjoyed the geo-political intrigue in this book, bringing to mind the Gabriel Allon series by Daniel Silva (one of my favorites).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Agnes

    A so-so entry in the series. It took quite a long time for the action to get going and when it did, it was actually quite depressing in the end. It increasingly feels like the balance of plot vs filler material is off and trending toward the latter. Did we really need a long description of the swim lessons Bruno gave? Also, given the earlier events, the wedding proceeding at the end made little sense. Also, I’m so over Bruno and Isabelle. We get that they rehash the same conversation every time A so-so entry in the series. It took quite a long time for the action to get going and when it did, it was actually quite depressing in the end. It increasingly feels like the balance of plot vs filler material is off and trending toward the latter. Did we really need a long description of the swim lessons Bruno gave? Also, given the earlier events, the wedding proceeding at the end made little sense. Also, I’m so over Bruno and Isabelle. We get that they rehash the same conversation every time they meet. Can we please move on now?

  7. 5 out of 5

    Wulf Krueger

    I’ve been a Bruno fan from the very first book on. I enjoyed reading so much about himself, his friends and the entire town. For quite a few books, things were developing nicely and Bruno became a favourite of mine. With this book, this ended. It all starts interesting enough with the death of an old sheep farmer and his children suspecting foul play when they find out they’ve effectively been disinherited. Bruno promises them to look into the entire issue and does fairly well, using his expertise I’ve been a Bruno fan from the very first book on. I enjoyed reading so much about himself, his friends and the entire town. For quite a few books, things were developing nicely and Bruno became a favourite of mine. With this book, this ended. It all starts interesting enough with the death of an old sheep farmer and his children suspecting foul play when they find out they’ve effectively been disinherited. Bruno promises them to look into the entire issue and does fairly well, using his expertise of rural laws and regulations - I was actually getting my hopes up of getting a real Bruno experience. Like a welcome mixture of... “Sex, drugs, murder—and cruelty to animals.” … as Walker puts it at one point. The mystery that starts out so well, takes a backseat to a confusing tale of an aging rockstar, his adult children, a Russian oligarch, his daughter, the Ukraine conflict and world politics… “Chateau Rock” reads like Walker is simply trying to boast about his cultural knowledge, e. g. About music and, thus, let’s Bruno, a rural French flic say this: “He recognized the notes of the Spanish classic Rodrigo’s Concierto de Aranjuez. At home, he had a CD of Paco de Lucía playing it on guitar while backed by an orchestra, the delicacy of the guitar against the deep sound of the strings and the sharp counterpoint of the clarinet.” But, ok, maybe Bruno suddenly developed a taste for Spanish guitar music who knows… Even the previous cooking sessions that used to be lovingly described while showing a self-reflecting Bruno, sometimes even getting a new insight into the investigation, feel forced and are entirely superfluous. They add nothing this time but are page after page of transcribed recipes - not what I’m reading Bruno for. Isabelle makes her usual cameo appearance but everyone else is severely neglected by Walker: Florence, Gilles, the Baron are all mentioned but play hardly any role at all and even rarely serve as bystanders as they sometimes did in the past. Even Bruno himself is weirdly unlike himself: Not only does he make several potentially severe rookie mistakes (which, magically, turn out to be non-issues) and he does a few things that make him (rightly!) question himself: “his self-doubts about his treatment of [...]. He knew it was standard police procedure, but it was not the way he liked to work.” Walker has lost me with this latest instalment in a series I used to love. Very sad. Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

  8. 4 out of 5

    Elaine Tomasso

    I would like to thank Netgalley and Quercus Books for an advance copy of A Shooting at Chateau Rock, the thirteenth novel to feature Bruno Courrèges, Chief of Police in the Dordgne town of St Denis. When old man Driant dies of a heart attack nobody is particularly surprised but when his son discovers that he has sold the farm and invested the proceeds in an insurance company that will pay for a lifestyle he’s unaccustomed to in a private retirement home Bruno’s antennae are raised. His investigat I would like to thank Netgalley and Quercus Books for an advance copy of A Shooting at Chateau Rock, the thirteenth novel to feature Bruno Courrèges, Chief of Police in the Dordgne town of St Denis. When old man Driant dies of a heart attack nobody is particularly surprised but when his son discovers that he has sold the farm and invested the proceeds in an insurance company that will pay for a lifestyle he’s unaccustomed to in a private retirement home Bruno’s antennae are raised. His investigation establishes links to a Russian oligarch, who is of great interest to the French Security Agencies and whose daughter is staying at the home of an ageing rock star. I thoroughly enjoyed A Shooting at Chateau Rock which is the usual mixture of topical issues and small town life with a dash of rural trickery at the expense of city slickers. I should say immediately that I have deducted points for the fact that the eponymous shooting doesn’t take place until the final chapters, thus goading me into impatience as I turned the pages quickly to get to the expected main event. The novel is told from Bruno’s point of view and is a charming mix of his personal and professional lives. Much is made of his dog, Balzac’s, first foray into love and it’s funny as is Bruno’s love of cooking and recipes for what he cooks, although they seem like a lot of effort to me. It seems like a simple life of friendship, barter and community but wrongdoing lurks and Bruno is the man to sort it out. I enjoyed his dismay at National Security (my capitalisation) issues trumping his suspicious death investigation and happily went along with his mutterings, possibly because I, like much of the readership, am not a big picture person. I also loved his use of agricultural laws to jumpstart his investigation, which is pure class with the bumpkins winning. It made me laugh but also underlines what I don’t understand about the bureaucracy of rural life. It’s an eye-opener. I must admit that the politics of the plot didn’t really hold my attention. Russia’s illegal efforts at world domination are, by now, so public that no recap is really necessary and I hate reading about refugees, because it’s too heartbreaking to fictionalise. Having said that the author puts it in more personal terms for some of the characters so it’s perhaps a little harder hitting. The plot itself is actually quite slim but that hardly matters as the warm atmosphere of friendship and all the details of Bruno’s life and lateral thinking more than make up for it. A Shooting at Chateau Rock is a good read that I have no hesitation in recommending.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ellinor

    The 13th instalment in the Bruno series is a mediocre mystery. It is all too obvious from the beginning how the old farmer died. Also, how many international criminals and terrorists can possibly show up in a small town as St Denis? All just so that Bruno can meet his ex Isabelle again. I‘m also getting tired of Bruno‘s cooking which I found very charming and mouthwatering in the first few books. I‘m also wondering how much free time he actually has, going on a morning run, then horseback riding The 13th instalment in the Bruno series is a mediocre mystery. It is all too obvious from the beginning how the old farmer died. Also, how many international criminals and terrorists can possibly show up in a small town as St Denis? All just so that Bruno can meet his ex Isabelle again. I‘m also getting tired of Bruno‘s cooking which I found very charming and mouthwatering in the first few books. I‘m also wondering how much free time he actually has, going on a morning run, then horseback riding, having breakfast at home and then at a Café, cooking for all his close friends (who seem to get more with each book), and teaching various sports to numerous children, all along with a fulltime job.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dede

    Interesting because it dealt with international issues that are real but I’m so tired of Bruno and Isabelle. Time for him to notice Florence

  11. 5 out of 5

    Booknblues

    I am an avid fan of Martin Walker's Bruno Chief of Police series. When I learned that the 13th one was to be released, I ordered it and upon receiving it quickly read it. I knew, I could count on Bruno for exhibiting a love of his people and an understanding and wisdom in dealing with any crimes or tragedies thrown his way. In this episode he states: "In Bruno’s experience the best way to deliver advice was to make it sound like something else." With Bruno, I can also expect some delightful reading I am an avid fan of Martin Walker's Bruno Chief of Police series. When I learned that the 13th one was to be released, I ordered it and upon receiving it quickly read it. I knew, I could count on Bruno for exhibiting a love of his people and an understanding and wisdom in dealing with any crimes or tragedies thrown his way. In this episode he states: "In Bruno’s experience the best way to deliver advice was to make it sound like something else." With Bruno, I can also expect some delightful reading about cooking and techniques. "Making gazpacho was for Bruno much more important than preparing a simple soup. It marked the moment when spring had turned indisputably into summer, when he routinely ate in the open air, and the garden provided most of his meals. He put on Macrae’s tape as he washed, trimmed and deseeded the vegetables before cutting them into chunks and putting them into his blender.",/i> This one was cleverly woven together and quite satisfying to read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Chris Conley

    There never are enough stars for one of Bruno’s stories. The world and characters Martin Walker created are endlessly fascinating. Each book opens new doors into their world. I look forward to the next!!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Inez

    Wow, another great read. Great story, and such wonderful people. However, I am sick of Isabelle & Pamela both selfish. When will Bruno have the sense to notice the really beautiful person Florence!! What is wrong with him. Enjoyed it very much. Wow, another great read. Great story, and such wonderful people. However, I am sick of Isabelle & Pamela both selfish. When will Bruno have the sense to notice the really beautiful person Florence!! What is wrong with him. Enjoyed it very much.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ken Fredette

    I love the Bruno books, Martin fills them with so much history and food that you are dazzled by the horse riding, petty things that are for farmers, the caves, and all the old Chateau's and the wine. Bruno is bothered by a distraught Gaston Driant over the death of his father who sold his farm to a insurance company to live his life out in a new residential home, leaving nothing to his two children. What happened to Driant's livestock was the initial thing that Bruno found wanting from the insura I love the Bruno books, Martin fills them with so much history and food that you are dazzled by the horse riding, petty things that are for farmers, the caves, and all the old Chateau's and the wine. Bruno is bothered by a distraught Gaston Driant over the death of his father who sold his farm to a insurance company to live his life out in a new residential home, leaving nothing to his two children. What happened to Driant's livestock was the initial thing that Bruno found wanting from the insurance company. All the people that ran the insurance company, the residential home, and ran a notaire office seemed to vanish when Bruno tried to meet them. This is one of the stories of this book. Another story is of the Château Rock which is owned by a Rock star from the 70's, Rod Macrae, was being sold by an agent from Paris. Another story is Pamela, Miranda and Fabiola and their interaction with Bruno's worry over the livestock and then the horses that Pamela owned. Not to be outdone is the story of the breeder of dogs that breeds basset hounds, who bred Blazac to her bitch, not without Isabelle being present. I won't go in to detail but lets just say there is a Russian involved and several grownup children and other people that are involved. J-J and the brigadier are also in the story so we have all the people. It's a story that is constantly changing so you might want to get it as a pre-ordered book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    David H.

    The thing that frustrated me the most with this book is that the "shooting" referred to in the title happens in the very last chapter (and (view spoiler)[no one gets hurt from the gun (hide spoiler)] ). Why would you do that? Anyway, Walker is continuing to be a bit formulaic here; though to be honest, it's a fantastic formula--small-town crime leads to something bigger, lots of cooking, some French/European history, lots of meeting up with friends, a bit of romance. (Though on the romance front, The thing that frustrated me the most with this book is that the "shooting" referred to in the title happens in the very last chapter (and (view spoiler)[no one gets hurt from the gun (hide spoiler)] ). Why would you do that? Anyway, Walker is continuing to be a bit formulaic here; though to be honest, it's a fantastic formula--small-town crime leads to something bigger, lots of cooking, some French/European history, lots of meeting up with friends, a bit of romance. (Though on the romance front, we're finally seeing something overt on something I've been rooting for for years. If it doesn't happen in the next book, I'm going to be annoyed!) I'd love to visit the Dordogne someday.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    It's summer in the Dordogne. The heirs of a Périgordian sheep farmer learn that they have been disinherited, and their father's estate sold to an insurance company in return for a policy that will place him in a five-star retirement home for the rest of his life. But the farmer never gets his life of luxury--he dies before moving in. Bruno begins the investigation that leads him to several shadowy insurance companies owned by a Russian oligarch with a Cypriot passport. The companies are based in It's summer in the Dordogne. The heirs of a Périgordian sheep farmer learn that they have been disinherited, and their father's estate sold to an insurance company in return for a policy that will place him in a five-star retirement home for the rest of his life. But the farmer never gets his life of luxury--he dies before moving in. Bruno begins the investigation that leads him to several shadowy insurance companies owned by a Russian oligarch with a Cypriot passport. The companies are based in Cyprus, Malta, and Luxembourg, but Bruno finds a weak spot in France: the Russian's France-based notaire and insurance agent. This is the thirteenth book in this engrossing series. Once again we are taken on a lovely trip to the French countryside as well as a mystery we have Bruno’s culinary skills & of course his faithful dog Balzac. I love this series & would highly recommend it however at the present time with lockdowns & no travel it was a delight to escape to sunny France for a few hours. Whilst not my favourite in the series & thoroughly enjoyed it & can’t wait for more My honest review is for a special copy I voluntarily read

  17. 4 out of 5

    Heather Love

    As this was the 13th mystery in this series I was a little concerned that I would be out of my depth with regard to what was going on and who was who, however I needn’t have worried.... it stands alone perfectly. However, now I want to read the other 12 🤦‍♀️ I thoroughly enjoyed it. I fell in love with Bruno, the Chief of Police, what a gentleman. Charming. The way in which this book was written I was transported to the Dordogne, I love France and now want to go to the Perigord region. Walker take As this was the 13th mystery in this series I was a little concerned that I would be out of my depth with regard to what was going on and who was who, however I needn’t have worried.... it stands alone perfectly. However, now I want to read the other 12 🤦‍♀️ I thoroughly enjoyed it. I fell in love with Bruno, the Chief of Police, what a gentleman. Charming. The way in which this book was written I was transported to the Dordogne, I love France and now want to go to the Perigord region. Walker takes you to the Dordogne with him. You can smell and taste the mouth watering food that Bruno cooks and find yourself imagining how easy it would be to immerse yourself into the community, to become a friend and join in the tradition of meeting to eat and drink fine red wine, with good friends. This is a light and very entertaining mystery thriller, a great page turner, and an enjoyable read. A local farmer, Driant, dies of a heart attack or so it seemed and his heirs were confused as to why they had been disinherited. It appears that Driant had sold the farm to an insurance company as collateral to stay in a luxury retirement home, but he died unexpectedly before taking up residence. Did he die of a heart attack or was it murder? This is what Bruno set about to find out. The death of Driant has nothing to do, necessarily, with the shooting at Chateau Rock which isn’t until towards the end of the book, however Walker creates a realistic connection. You learn quite a lot about Driant and what he’s been up to that may have got him killed. And this takes Bruno on a journey of intrigue to find out exactly what happened to this acquaintance who he historically played tennis with. I loved the characters, the warmth, sense of community, local activity, romance, the mystery and the Russian connection. And there’s a gorgeous dog, Balzac a Bassett Hound, Bruno’s companion, who is taken on an interesting journey of his own. I learnt quite a lot from this story too. In particular, Walker touches the history of the Ukraine and what happened there, the Maidan protest movement, a wave of demonstrations and civil unrest resulted in a number of deaths and this has an impact on the party at Chateau Rock. Would most definitely recommend. 5⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ from me. Thank you to the author, Netgalley and Quercus Books for this eARC provided in exchange for this unbiased review.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    To my surprise, this is one of my favorite Bruno books, and possibly the best. Relevant and important international themes are developed, crossing borders, agendas, and loyalties. Yet the big issues in French government and policing are, as always in Bruno novels, crouched in the beauty of the Dordogne, delicious food with friends, and camaraderie. My favorite thread in these mysteries is the characters who reappear over time and share a love of their community and for one another. Many have gro To my surprise, this is one of my favorite Bruno books, and possibly the best. Relevant and important international themes are developed, crossing borders, agendas, and loyalties. Yet the big issues in French government and policing are, as always in Bruno novels, crouched in the beauty of the Dordogne, delicious food with friends, and camaraderie. My favorite thread in these mysteries is the characters who reappear over time and share a love of their community and for one another. Many have grown and developed over these 13 books, and I treasure meeting them along the way. That said, this book, particularly, can be read without any background, without knowing the characters from previous works. Oh, and the clever writing - Martin Walker seems to be growing and developing as a writer too: A surprise sequence of events given the title, a great story arc, and gripping ending. "I recommend The Shooting at Chateau Rock" everywhere I go. Thank you MW, and Bruno!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lois

    Five stars for pure reading entertainment. Author Martin Walker has brought back favorite characters, introduced a few new ones, included the usual mouth-watering descriptions of food and its careful preparation, and described, in detail, the mating of basset hounds. For the plot, Walker draws upon his own deep knowledge of Russian/Ukrainian conflicts and the ongoing European investigations into shady Russian oligarchs. He also pays tribute to musicians and music festivals. These novels must sur Five stars for pure reading entertainment. Author Martin Walker has brought back favorite characters, introduced a few new ones, included the usual mouth-watering descriptions of food and its careful preparation, and described, in detail, the mating of basset hounds. For the plot, Walker draws upon his own deep knowledge of Russian/Ukrainian conflicts and the ongoing European investigations into shady Russian oligarchs. He also pays tribute to musicians and music festivals. These novels must surely draw tourists to the Dordogne region of France!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Diana

    THE SHOOTING AT CHATEAU ROCK by Martin Walker is #13 in Mr. Walker’s Bruno, Chief of Police series. There are many interwoven themes and characters here: Balzac’s trip to the breeding kennel; the owners of the Chateau Rock, Rod & Meghan Macrea; Russian oligarchs; an interrupted inheritance; very shady retirement homes; espionage; hostages; suspicious (and deadly) car crashes; wonderful food and wine; and the brilliant array of local residents and locations of the small town of St. Denis in France’s THE SHOOTING AT CHATEAU ROCK by Martin Walker is #13 in Mr. Walker’s Bruno, Chief of Police series. There are many interwoven themes and characters here: Balzac’s trip to the breeding kennel; the owners of the Chateau Rock, Rod & Meghan Macrea; Russian oligarchs; an interrupted inheritance; very shady retirement homes; espionage; hostages; suspicious (and deadly) car crashes; wonderful food and wine; and the brilliant array of local residents and locations of the small town of St. Denis in France’s Perigord region. I love this series and these characters and locations. *****

  21. 5 out of 5

    Abibliofob

    First of all I have to thank Martin Walker for creating one of my all time favorite characters, I love the Bruno mysteries. I also thank Edelweiss, Knopf and Random House for letting me read this book. This series is wonderfully set in Dordogne and is making me hungry reading it. The setting and characters are some of the best in modern literature in my opinion. I actually wish I could discover the series once again so I could read it all over and be pleasantly surprised once more. Strong recome First of all I have to thank Martin Walker for creating one of my all time favorite characters, I love the Bruno mysteries. I also thank Edelweiss, Knopf and Random House for letting me read this book. This series is wonderfully set in Dordogne and is making me hungry reading it. The setting and characters are some of the best in modern literature in my opinion. I actually wish I could discover the series once again so I could read it all over and be pleasantly surprised once more. Strong recomendations from a book nerd in Sweden.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Joann Kramer

    I always enjoy Martin Walker’s books set in the fictional small town of St. Denis in the Périgord region of France. I love the characters, the idyllic scenery, the food, the wine & the story. It combines the elements of a mystery, police procedural, current political situation, and interesting bits of local color ( scenery, food, & wine). You don’t need to read the series in order. However, it is interesting to see the characters over time. I always enjoy Martin Walker’s books set in the fictional small town of St. Denis in the Périgord region of France. I love the characters, the idyllic scenery, the food, the wine & the story. It combines the elements of a mystery, police procedural, current political situation, and interesting bits of local color ( scenery, food, & wine). You don’t need to read the series in order. However, it is interesting to see the characters over time.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dale Wyant

    This delightful series never fails! So happy to be back in St. Denis with characters I have come to know and love. The title was misleading, but the story was well put forth, even though I would like to see some resolution to Bruno's love life! It does feel, as another reviewer wrote, that it is time for the next phase of his life. Highly recommend you start at the beginning of the series, you have 12 more tales to enjoy during your lockdown!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Cathy Cole

    Martin Walker skillfully weaves so much information about France and Europe in general into The Shooting at Château Rock that, after I'd finished reading the book, it took a while for my mind to leave the Périgord. This book is about so much more than the fleecing of the elderly. Readers learn that although Europe knows that Russian criminals and oligarchs are moving into their countries, getting passports from places like Malta and Cyprus in an effort to hide their true Russian citizenship, the Martin Walker skillfully weaves so much information about France and Europe in general into The Shooting at Château Rock that, after I'd finished reading the book, it took a while for my mind to leave the Périgord. This book is about so much more than the fleecing of the elderly. Readers learn that although Europe knows that Russian criminals and oligarchs are moving into their countries, getting passports from places like Malta and Cyprus in an effort to hide their true Russian citizenship, they still have to tread carefully since half of Europe is dependent on Russian gas. I also learned that drones are being used to video opulent properties when they're being placed on the real estate market for sale. (How the other half lives, eh?) No matter how hard Bruno works to track down the bad guys, there's still plenty of interaction with his friends, and-- let's face it-- that's what most Bruno fans eagerly await in each new book. There are several delicious meals lovingly described in The Shooting at Château Rock, and I loved the addition of music to the storyline. Bruno's young Basset hound, Balzac, also gets his turn in the spotlight. You can't have a new book in the series without dealing with Bruno's love life. Fans know that his penchant for strong, independent women means that he hasn't found the right one who wants to settle down and raise a family with him. Here he seems to be nudged in a direction that I'd wondered about myself. Only time will tell what's in store for our favorite French policeman. During the course of this series, Walker has shown us how the various law enforcement agencies work in France, and it's a fascinating glimpse into how another country protects its citizens. But Bruno does wonder-- as I sometimes do-- if there's still room for the human factor amidst all the technology and the massive amounts of data it can uncover. After all, most of Bruno's success is based on the fact that he knows most of the citizens in his area-- and they know and trust him. Fans of this series should love The Shooting at Château Rock. If you're new to the series, I'm going to admit that you could read this book and not feel lost... but don't be surprised if you find yourself going back to read the rest of the books. They are quite the delectable feast.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Seema Rao

    This series books have moved from engrossing to pleasant

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    I think it is time that Bruno gave up on Isabelle and married Florence!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Too much cooking detail—don’t need the recipe unless Bruno gets a cooking show. Liked the Isabelle/Bruno/Balzac subplot.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Another delightful read. I love Bruno. As always, the best parts are the descriptions of the meals.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

    A Shooting at Chateau Rock: The Dordogne Mysteries 13 (Bruno, Chief of Police #13) Martin Walker. iBook 5/5 Read all the Bruno books and some short stories plus some stand alone books by this author but first time I have seen them referred to as The Dordogne Mysteries!!! Absolutely wonderful series. Whatever they want to call them, I enjoy reading this series very much and always look forward to another Bruno book or any book by this author! There are several stories running throughout this book. A Shooting at Chateau Rock: The Dordogne Mysteries 13 (Bruno, Chief of Police #13) Martin Walker. iBook 5/5 Read all the Bruno books and some short stories plus some stand alone books by this author but first time I have seen them referred to as The Dordogne Mysteries!!! Absolutely wonderful series. Whatever they want to call them, I enjoy reading this series very much and always look forward to another Bruno book or any book by this author! There are several stories running throughout this book. And truly a lot of this book is a current view of our Europe of today and what is occurring around us here. Nothing is as simple as it appears! As always Bruno and his young pedigree basset Balzac are joined by characters in the village and area that are familiar. Bruno attends the weekly market and helps with school sport and exercises his horse Hector daily with Pamela and friends. His garden and his runs, his cooking and his entertaining friends. Helping kids with tennis and swimming and music..... Busy life and relationships and love all intertwine with a enjoyment of nature, music and friendships mingled with a true passion for the great cuisine of the region. But don’t be fooled, murder, politics, international criminal links ranging through Cyprus, Lesbos refugees, Canadian extremists, links to Ukraine massacre, history or current, poisonings in England and a Dutch plane downed with many dead...linked to Russia, with webs throughout the EU. And there always comes a point when he is deputized by the top French terrorist control to take a role in the drama unfolding .... Following the funeral of a local farmer, Bruno is contacted by his son who is shocked that the farmer has left his two grown children out of his will because he has signed the property over to an insurance company just before his fatal heart attack! Why would an old sheep farmer want to live in a luxury retirement home! While looking into this Bruno to his dismay discovers the livestock and trained sheep dogs just left and in neglect at the property and brings action against the new owners, who become almost impossible to track down. Bruno suspects that the retirement home and the insurance company have links to a Russian oligarch whose dealings are already being tracked by the French police at the highest level. At the same time, an aging British rock star is selling his estate called Chateau Rock. The star's son returns for the summer with his Russian girlfriend. They make amazing music together and have a number of ‘friends’ with them, or are they bodyguards for her! As Bruno pursues his inquiries into the farmer's death and the stolen inheritance, he learns that the oligarch is none other than the girlfriend's father with direct ties to Putin. Cyprus handing out citizenships to eastern neighbors who want EU papers is well covered in this read! A huge issue within the EU.... This all leads to murder and private jets being stopped and a hostage situation......great tension! Bruno negotiating and in full combat mode. But luckily Bruno still has time to cook delicious meals for his friends and enjoy the life of his beloved Dordogne. Exercise his horse Hector and spend time with his wonderful friends. He and Isabelle meet up to take Balzac their basset hound to breed for the first time. And their continuing story is always heartwarming of the ability to enjoy true love and combine with a need to live one’s life to the full. Balance. Next please.....

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kath

    Wowsers, we're on book 13 of this series already and with absolutely no signs of flagging. Obviously I would recommend starting from book one and reading in order which will give you a much better feeling of the setting and the people who inhabit this wonderful part of the world. This is especially important as there is quite a cast of characters to contend with, most with quite a rich history. Throw in quite a lot of wonderful food as the cast meet regularly to break bread (I believe there's a Wowsers, we're on book 13 of this series already and with absolutely no signs of flagging. Obviously I would recommend starting from book one and reading in order which will give you a much better feeling of the setting and the people who inhabit this wonderful part of the world. This is especially important as there is quite a cast of characters to contend with, most with quite a rich history. Throw in quite a lot of wonderful food as the cast meet regularly to break bread (I believe there's a cookbook that accompanies this series) and you really get immersed in all things Dordogne as you read on... So, in this book Bruno is approached by the heir to one of the local sheep farmers who has sadly died, and who was shocked to find that he had been disinherited. It appears that the farm had been sold and that the return for that was an insurance policy for a posh retirement home. Originally ruled a natural death, at the time obvious given the farmer's health issues, Bruno starts to wonder if indeed this was the case and starts his investigations in earnest. Beginning with the retirement home. This leads him into international waters which allows certain of his old friends to reconnect and assist with his endeavours. Meanwhile we have the chateau owning, aged rockstar who is having a gathering prior to maybe selling up. When these world collide Bruno has his work cut out for him getting to the truth. I love this series. I got into it late and spent a while playing catch up, something I have already recommended not just for backstory and character development but also cos they are all really rather good. Starting a new book in this series just feels so comfortable and cosy, reconnecting with old friends - exactly what we all need in the troubled times we all find ourselves in these days. A few hours of distraction, swept away to the Dordogne, that wonderful special place that the author really does bring to life within the pages of his books. Couple that with the gastronomic delights that are served up throughout and throw in a rather intriguing plot which kept me on my toes throughout and this book is the complete package. In fact, the only bad (and sad) thing about this book happened as I was approaching the end. I was desperate to get to the end to finish the story but, at the same time, wanting to cherish every last moment I would have with the characters that I have grown to love. Not wanting the book to end, not wanting to say goodbye. And that, my friends, is the sign of a great series. The anticipation for the next book is nearly overwhelming. My thanks go to the Publisher and Netgalley for the chance to read this book.

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