counter create hit Love Is a Revolution - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Love Is a Revolution

Availability: Ready to download

From New York Times bestselling and award-winning author Rene Watson comes a new YA--a love story about not only a romantic relationship but how a girl finds herself and falls in love with who she really is. When Nala Robertson reluctantly agrees to attend an open mic night for her cousin-sister-friend Imani's birthday, she finds herself falling in instant love with Tye Br From New York Times bestselling and award-winning author Rene Watson comes a new YA--a love story about not only a romantic relationship but how a girl finds herself and falls in love with who she really is. When Nala Robertson reluctantly agrees to attend an open mic night for her cousin-sister-friend Imani's birthday, she finds herself falling in instant love with Tye Brown, the MC. He's perfect, except . . . Tye is an activist and is spending the summer putting on events for the community when Nala would rather watch movies and try out the new seasonal flavors at the local creamery. In order to impress Tye, Nala tells a few tiny lies to have enough in common with him. As they spend more time together, sharing more of themselves, some of those lies get harder to keep up. As Nala falls deeper into keeping up her lies and into love, she'll learn all the ways love is hard, and how self-love is revolutionary. In Love Is a Revolution, plus size girls are beautiful and get the attention of the hot guys, the popular girl clique is not shallow but has strong convictions and substance, and the ultimate love story is not only about romance but about how to show radical love to the people in your life, including to yourself.


Compare

From New York Times bestselling and award-winning author Rene Watson comes a new YA--a love story about not only a romantic relationship but how a girl finds herself and falls in love with who she really is. When Nala Robertson reluctantly agrees to attend an open mic night for her cousin-sister-friend Imani's birthday, she finds herself falling in instant love with Tye Br From New York Times bestselling and award-winning author Rene Watson comes a new YA--a love story about not only a romantic relationship but how a girl finds herself and falls in love with who she really is. When Nala Robertson reluctantly agrees to attend an open mic night for her cousin-sister-friend Imani's birthday, she finds herself falling in instant love with Tye Brown, the MC. He's perfect, except . . . Tye is an activist and is spending the summer putting on events for the community when Nala would rather watch movies and try out the new seasonal flavors at the local creamery. In order to impress Tye, Nala tells a few tiny lies to have enough in common with him. As they spend more time together, sharing more of themselves, some of those lies get harder to keep up. As Nala falls deeper into keeping up her lies and into love, she'll learn all the ways love is hard, and how self-love is revolutionary. In Love Is a Revolution, plus size girls are beautiful and get the attention of the hot guys, the popular girl clique is not shallow but has strong convictions and substance, and the ultimate love story is not only about romance but about how to show radical love to the people in your life, including to yourself.

30 review for Love Is a Revolution

  1. 5 out of 5

    Hailey (Hailey in Bookland)

    I have some pretty mixed feelings on this one. I had a love hate relationship with the main character because while I think she was realistically flawed which was nice, I don't always want to read about a perfect character, but it did also make the book really frustrating. Enjoyment wise, that's where it did kind of suffer. However, I think the book did a lot of great things as well. It's a love story but self love is also at the forefront and that was a really nice touch. I think a lot of peopl I have some pretty mixed feelings on this one. I had a love hate relationship with the main character because while I think she was realistically flawed which was nice, I don't always want to read about a perfect character, but it did also make the book really frustrating. Enjoyment wise, that's where it did kind of suffer. However, I think the book did a lot of great things as well. It's a love story but self love is also at the forefront and that was a really nice touch. I think a lot of people could benefit from this read as you watch the main character learn to love who she is without the lies. This was a really fast read overall and I think it had a great message, you just have to accept the fact that the main character isn't the most readily likeable as she can be really judgmental and still has a lot of growing up to do, but that does make for a lot of room for character growth.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lala BooksandLala

    Renée Watson continues to write fully realized and dynamic teen characters. I always enjoy my time getting to know the casts of characters she crafts and discovering their feelings and motivations along the way. Unfortunately the goal of the book I feel got a little lost along the way. Thanks to Raincoast Books for the early copy! Full review is on my youtube channel.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nilufer Ozmekik

    Wow! Since I start reading this ultra delicious, moving, honest, motivating, inspirational book Bob Marley’s song started playing in my head: “ Get up, stand up, stand up for your rights!” Renee Watson did an incredible job by creating those memorable, truly sweetest, most lovable and natural characters! I’m not only talking about Nala who grows up, wearing big girls pants , learning to be brave to rediscover herself by facing her fears. Or Tye who checks all the boxes to become sweetest pie and Wow! Since I start reading this ultra delicious, moving, honest, motivating, inspirational book Bob Marley’s song started playing in my head: “ Get up, stand up, stand up for your rights!” Renee Watson did an incredible job by creating those memorable, truly sweetest, most lovable and natural characters! I’m not only talking about Nala who grows up, wearing big girls pants , learning to be brave to rediscover herself by facing her fears. Or Tye who checks all the boxes to become sweetest pie and best book boyfriend. I’m also talking about Imani, Sadie, grandmother and ice cream addict JT( best role model as grandfather candidate)! This book is not only about love, romance, growing pains, challenges of leaving childhood behind to become grown up! There are so many great political, self awareness, environmental, eco-biological messages. But the best thing I enjoyed about this boom is a unique girl’s pure, genuine heartwarming story who has her own insecurities, thinking little about herself, losing her way, pretending to be another person to be loved and adored. I loved Nala. I loved the paths she followed to find herself. I loved her bravery, resilience, honesty. And of course I fell in love with every song words written in this book. (Nala listens to imaginary singer Blue and the singer’s inspirational song lyrics have been shared at beginnings of some chapters) After reading those enthusiastic, moving, pure emotional words pouring from the writer’s heart, you feel like you can achieve anything you dream. Only thing holds you back your own fear! I’m giving a quick summary of storyline to give more details about characters and story’s processing: Nala Robertson leaves her childhood house at age of 13, after the big argument she’d had with her mother, living with her Aunt Ebony- Uncle Randy and her cousin-sister- friend Imani. She falls in love with Tye Brown at first sight during the open mic night for her cousin’s birthday party. She also feels like her cousin and she are slowly drifting apart because Imani is a part of Inspire Harlem group, which is an activist organization to improve the social, economic, environmental, political conditions of neighborhood. And Nala has hard time to be part of it. But as soon as she meets Tye, she blurts out some white lies to pretend she is dealing with social responsibility project for seniors. And as she continues to share more about herself, her lies get out of control. Could Tye like real her or could she actually find her true self and tell him the truth? Layered, perfectly crafted characters, lyrical, emotional, provocative, powerful story telling and meaningful messages made me fall in love with this beautiful novel. I’m giving well deserved, well written, memorable five stars for the soul of beautiful young women who are brave enough to raise up their voices! Special thanks to NetGalley and Bloomsbury USA Children’s Books/ Bloomsbury YA for sharing this digital copy of this incredible book in exchange my honest thoughts.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kai

    I like that Renée writes YA for actual teenagers when most of the YA books I read these days are written for an older audience. I also love the body positivity and the generally joyful contemporary story about a young Black girl trying to find her place in the world. What bothered me were the predictability of the story and the girl-on-girl hate that dominates most of the main character's relationships with other girls around her. The author eventually acknowledges that the MC needs to change th I like that Renée writes YA for actual teenagers when most of the YA books I read these days are written for an older audience. I also love the body positivity and the generally joyful contemporary story about a young Black girl trying to find her place in the world. What bothered me were the predictability of the story and the girl-on-girl hate that dominates most of the main character's relationships with other girls around her. The author eventually acknowledges that the MC needs to change this negative attitude but it's only mentioned in a single sentence. Oh and also, where are the queer characters? We have a group of young, Black activists interested in changing the world for good and constantly quoting icons like James Baldwin and such but there's not a single queer person? I don't think. Find more of my books on Instagram

  5. 5 out of 5

    SincerelyTahiry

    Im lowkey disappointed with this book. I was living for the cover and the idea of a plus size black girl learning to love herself. Also the book is set in NYC which I didn’t know initially. However Nala and every other female character were competing to see who was was more “not like other girls”. All of her relationships with her peers were super shallow. But mainly I was DEEPLY annoyed that Nalas whole personality was that she wasn’t “super woke”. How are you judging these other black kids for Im lowkey disappointed with this book. I was living for the cover and the idea of a plus size black girl learning to love herself. Also the book is set in NYC which I didn’t know initially. However Nala and every other female character were competing to see who was was more “not like other girls”. All of her relationships with her peers were super shallow. But mainly I was DEEPLY annoyed that Nalas whole personality was that she wasn’t “super woke”. How are you judging these other black kids for being activist and helping the black community but don’t even know how to do your own hair? Maybe u need more black friends in your life 🙄 CHILE ANYWAY....the writing was super juvenile to me and idk if it’s cuz I’m over ya romance or what. I also hate the whole “I’m gonna lie about who i am to get a guy to like me “ trope. It’s played out. And even though I understand where the author was going by making Nala start out like that, her growth didn’t feel believable. I was super interested to hear about her relationship with her mom because I have a similar experience, however we never even got the full story of how they had a falling out. Which was a huge turning point in Nalas life and is constantly being referenced. And because the romance was based on a stupid lies, I never got to enjoy the summer love story I wanted to read about.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Holly | The Caffeinated Reader

    * thank you to Bloomsbury for providing an Arc in exchange for an honest review * I really wanted to love this book. It'd been one of my anticipated reads for 2021 because not only do I love cute YA contemporaries, but I especially love ones that give us plus-size rep. Unfortunately though, I felt it missed the mark. I think the main reason for this, is because the book sets up and uses a lot of toxic tropes that we've seen in YA over the years, and whilst the ending shows the authors intent to u * thank you to Bloomsbury for providing an Arc in exchange for an honest review * I really wanted to love this book. It'd been one of my anticipated reads for 2021 because not only do I love cute YA contemporaries, but I especially love ones that give us plus-size rep. Unfortunately though, I felt it missed the mark. I think the main reason for this, is because the book sets up and uses a lot of toxic tropes that we've seen in YA over the years, and whilst the ending shows the authors intent to undermine them and show how negative they can be, because it's done so briefly and only within the final chapters, it leaves the book feeling extremely negative. Throughout the book, almost all the female characters are competing with each other. This does get addressed towards the end when Nala realises she needs to change her way of thinking, however, because it's done so late into the narrative, we don't actually get to witness the change in Nala's behaviour which I think would have proved to be a really powerful image. Instead, we're left with a book where 90% of the narrative is just girls being mean and rude to each other, which completely fails to promote girls-supporting-girls. Alongside this negativity, we also have Nala constantly judging the teen activists her cousin has befriended. And whilst I completely understand that not everyone has to be actively involved in activism, I don't necessarily know if in the current social climate we're facing and witnessing, if a narrative centred around criticising teen activists is something we should be encouraging. As for the plus-size rep, I wish the author had done more with it. Of course it's amazing just to have a confident plus-size black main character, but I wish the author had really made a point of body confidence and self-love, because even though it popped up here and there, it didn't really feel that prominent in the book as a whole. I also found that for a book focused on teen activists that has such a great representation in terms of body shape and race, that it was severely lacking in any LGBT+ representation which was disappointing. I really wanted to love this book, but overall, I just felt disappointed. I do still think it's a cute book that's quick to read, but it wasn't for me and I just really wanted a lot more from it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Reading_ Tam_ Ishly

    *A few good lines from the first few pages of the book: Imani: "I mean, I'm a fan too, but really? You've had the song on repeat all day." Nala: "This from the queen of rewatching movies and saying the lines with the characters." (Well, I'm both ☺️ May the Fangirling Nation prosper everyday!) "I'm fat. It's just a description. It doesn't have to cast a negative judgement." 'And this is where we differ. I am not down with the Say-It-Loud-I'm-Fat-and-I'm-Proud movement. I don't have low self-esteem or *A few good lines from the first few pages of the book: Imani: "I mean, I'm a fan too, but really? You've had the song on repeat all day." Nala: "This from the queen of rewatching movies and saying the lines with the characters." (Well, I'm both ☺️ May the Fangirling Nation prosper everyday!) "I'm fat. It's just a description. It doesn't have to cast a negative judgement." 'And this is where we differ. I am not down with the Say-It-Loud-I'm-Fat-and-I'm-Proud movement. I don't have low self-esteem or anything. I just don't feel the need to talk about my weight or make statements about it or reclaim a word that was never mine in the first place.' *2021 disappointing reads list is gaining members fast! This one is pretty well damn too annoying to read. Thought the main character would be someone that's not this shallow and predictable. Yes, I am fully aware of the genre and the target audience this book is for but this one is pretty too damn obvious and the characters not that developed well. The plot is quite predictable and the writing delivered nothing much more for a new book. I wish Imani, the cousin of the main character, was the main character. No matter what happened towards the second half didn't matter much because the harm was already done and the character we are dealing with wasn't something I would like young readers to read about. Sometimes the writing gets too damn superficial apart from being too predictable. I wish the themes of body image and the other issues were handled better. The side characters are good. The main character was just awful. *The book started out well but after a few pages, I began rolling my eyes because the character got too superficial, mean and lied about almost everything (even though things might become better towards the end and the characters developed a bit but it is frustrating to read something like this) I wish the story developed well instead of the main character being so stupid. Yes, stupid. Totally. Utterly. Hurting the ones who cared about her. Ok. Thank you, next!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Layla (Between the Lines)

    First, let me just (not be the first to) say that this cover is absolutely beautiful. I love everything about it, and I especially love seeing plus-size representation. Now, it is no surprise to me at all that Renée was able to cultivate the voices of such realistic and messy teens. She truly owns the craft of writing for young adults. I'm an "adult" reading YA books, so not everything is going to resonate with me, but that doesn't take away from the importance of this story. Love Is a Revolution First, let me just (not be the first to) say that this cover is absolutely beautiful. I love everything about it, and I especially love seeing plus-size representation. Now, it is no surprise to me at all that Renée was able to cultivate the voices of such realistic and messy teens. She truly owns the craft of writing for young adults. I'm an "adult" reading YA books, so not everything is going to resonate with me, but that doesn't take away from the importance of this story. Love Is a Revolution will resonate with its intended audience. I enjoyed watching the gradual journey towards Nala's personal growth (in both maturity and self-love) but I wish there was further development in the area of family dynamics, particularly her history with her mother and her relationship with Imani. In any case, I look forward to Watson's next release. Actual rating: 3.75/5

  9. 4 out of 5

    izzy

    The cover remains the best part tbh. This book, despite having a 16-year-old protagonist, was basically a middle-grade novel. Everything from the prose, characterization, and over-the-top messaging screamed Topical Middle Grade™️. Now don't get me wrong; I'm a fan of Topical Middle Grade™️. I have a 12-year-old sister and those are the books I want her to read. But they're not the books I necessarily want to read, and it's too bad this is advertised as older YA when it's really not. I originally The cover remains the best part tbh. This book, despite having a 16-year-old protagonist, was basically a middle-grade novel. Everything from the prose, characterization, and over-the-top messaging screamed Topical Middle Grade™️. Now don't get me wrong; I'm a fan of Topical Middle Grade™️. I have a 12-year-old sister and those are the books I want her to read. But they're not the books I necessarily want to read, and it's too bad this is advertised as older YA when it's really not. I originally rated this but decided to remove it. It's not that it was awful, but I am not the target audience, and it was felt when reading.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

    DNF at 72% This is kind of a case of: this isn't really what I was hoping for and the more I read the more I find that irritating. I was really excited for a summer romance with a plus sized, Black heroine. I wasn't expecting the entire plot to involve the main character lying about herself to impress a boy, or for that relationship to become increasingly toxic. It's more a case study in what not to do, and using tropes that I just don't enjoy at this point in my life. I also wasn't a fan of the DNF at 72% This is kind of a case of: this isn't really what I was hoping for and the more I read the more I find that irritating. I was really excited for a summer romance with a plus sized, Black heroine. I wasn't expecting the entire plot to involve the main character lying about herself to impress a boy, or for that relationship to become increasingly toxic. It's more a case study in what not to do, and using tropes that I just don't enjoy at this point in my life. I also wasn't a fan of the antagonistic female relationships and girl hate throughout. I like that we get a confident, plus size heroine who loves her family, and a guy who's genuinely into her. I also appreciate the conversations around activism (although it gets a little old having the MC be so negative about it all the time), but this other stuff made it less than enjoyable for me. Unfortunately, this wasn't the book for me, but I could see how some teens might connect with it more. I am sad though because the cover is stunning and the premise sounded so great! I received an advance copy of this book for review via NetGalley. All opinions are my own.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cassie

    I am so in love with this cover and I am here for all the plus size and self love rep 😌💗

  12. 4 out of 5

    anna ✩

    4.5 stars! Love is a Revolution is a powerful book about finding yourself in the height of your teenage years. It's about love and family and everything that comes with the pressure of growing up and figuring out who you are. It's summer and Nala Robertson wants to make sure she makes the most of it before her senior year begins. When Nala reluctantly joins her cousin for her birthday celebration/talent show, she ends up meeting Tye Brown and sparks fly instantly. In order to impress Tye, Nala te 4.5 stars! Love is a Revolution is a powerful book about finding yourself in the height of your teenage years. It's about love and family and everything that comes with the pressure of growing up and figuring out who you are. It's summer and Nala Robertson wants to make sure she makes the most of it before her senior year begins. When Nala reluctantly joins her cousin for her birthday celebration/talent show, she ends up meeting Tye Brown and sparks fly instantly. In order to impress Tye, Nala tells a few lies about certain about herself in hope they will have a lot of stuff in common. Quickly, Nala realises that it is unfeasible to pretend someone she's not and that what she really needs is self love and self confidence. I don't think there are enough words I can out down to describe the incredible journey this book takes you on. It's not about a teenage girl who moulds herself to find love or fit into society, it's about a teenage girl who is trying to find her place in the world and takes action to become the person she wants to be. Love is a Revolution is an amazing story with well crafted characters and a remarkable growth arc. Nala is written exactly as a real teenager would be. She's not perfect, she's only human, and she makes mistakes as such. Plus all the other characters in this are very self aware and working towards a better future - not only for them but also for the our planet. There's so much to be learned from this book and from Nala's growth story. Renee Watson has a remarkable writing style and creates hard hitting, real, raw stories that are also full of happiness and hope. Nala is a Jamaican-American plus size girl and there's never a point in the book where this becomes the sole plot line, or where this makes her life more difficult in any way. This is an incredible joyous book with great representation and I feel there is definitely a need for more of these. Overall, an incredibly fast paced story with very important discussions about what it means to love and believe in yourself. Thank you so much to Bloomsbury for gifting me an arc.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dahlia

    I just love Renee Watson. Her books are such a great tough love + big hug combo, and this was no exception.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Chidimma Desiree

    This book was a big fat NO for me. This is my fourth Renée Watson book and I’m so disappointed. I could have never predicted me disliking this book this much. My main issue with this book is the main character, Nala. SHE WAS INSUFFERABLE! I found her to be condescending and judgmental of others ironically because she also thought people were judging her. She was so dismissive of what people around her were passionate about for literally NO REASON at all it was really weird to me. Like someone wo This book was a big fat NO for me. This is my fourth Renée Watson book and I’m so disappointed. I could have never predicted me disliking this book this much. My main issue with this book is the main character, Nala. SHE WAS INSUFFERABLE! I found her to be condescending and judgmental of others ironically because she also thought people were judging her. She was so dismissive of what people around her were passionate about for literally NO REASON at all it was really weird to me. Like someone would say something about how they care about using reusable water bottles and not plastic and she would make it seem as if they were attacking her it was bizarre. She seemed like a hater throughout most of the book My other issue with this book was the romance. This couple was so mismatched, I really didn’t see how they could work in the future. It made no sense to me. They didn’t seem like a good pairing like at all, they both felt too self centered and pushed their ideas on to the other instead of truly listening and caring about what the other person’s beliefs were. I felt like the whole loving yourself thing the author brought in last minute was so rushed and seemed very forced. In my opinion it would have made more sense if the couple didn’t end up together. This book was just not for me and I’m more surprised than anyone how much I didn’t like this book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    Nala's stoked about summer, and among the many lists she keeps, one thing she knows for sure she wants to cross off before school begins again is to finally get a boyfriend. So when Nala joins her cousin/best friend Imani at one of Imani's activist group events and sees Tye, it's crush at first sight. But activism isn't really Nala's thing, as she struggles with tremendous insecurity and worries about using her own voice as a tool of power. Her feeling for Tye continue to amplify and Nala begins Nala's stoked about summer, and among the many lists she keeps, one thing she knows for sure she wants to cross off before school begins again is to finally get a boyfriend. So when Nala joins her cousin/best friend Imani at one of Imani's activist group events and sees Tye, it's crush at first sight. But activism isn't really Nala's thing, as she struggles with tremendous insecurity and worries about using her own voice as a tool of power. Her feeling for Tye continue to amplify and Nala begins telling him a series of lies about who she is. Yes, she's a vegetarian (she's not). She has a job at a local senior living home and helps coordinate projects for the residents (she doesn't -- she goes to visit her grandmother). She begins to change her hair and her style to fit the perception she believes Tye has of her and yet, she's struggling to keep the lies and facade up. It all comes to a head one night and despite how well the relationship had been going, she breaks and tells him the truth. Herein begins the real revolution: Nala is going to learn to love herself first and foremost. Watson's novel is a story of learning who you are, how you fit in, and how it's okay to be interested and engaged in what lights you up, as opposed to what you think other people want you to be excited about. Nala is not a loud, proud activist like her cousin or her friends. She prefers to be a little more behind the scenes, and despite living with her cousin who encourages her to embrace who she is wholeheartedly, Nala doesn't even want to call herself fat. She's got a body and that's enough for her. I love the idea that falling for someone could be the impetus for embracing who you are deeply because sometimes, that's how it works out. Nala was unable to bring her true self to this relationship and instead brought someone she thought she should be. And when she realizes it's simply not her and she'll continue being disappointed by how she's treated because of it -- for example, she doesn't want a metal water bottle as a gift to help cut down on plastic use because it's simply NOT something that shows love to her the same way a few flowers might -- Nala decides to step back and settle into a project of being honest with herself about who she is. There are so many excellent pieces to the story: Nala's love of her grandmother and other seniors at the living center; the smells, sounds, and tastes of Harlem; the interspersed lists of Nala's hopes and dreams and thoughts; the message that you can love yourself as you are without necessarily affixing a label to it; that everyone's activism and passion looks different; how a strained parent-child relationship can function; what it looks like to grow up with a father who decides to move back to his home country of Jamaica. Watson's a master at writing coming-of-age, and this feel-good romance will resonate deeply. Pair this one with Brandy Colbert's The Voting Booth, among so many others.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Anniek

    Many thanks to Bloomsbury for the ARC! I often read YA contemporary to not have to think too much for a little while. But sometimes, you come across a book that really makes you think. This is not a book that everyone will love. It's really messy, and the main character, Nala, is not always at her best and not always very likeable. I did however really love her and I loved going on this journey of self love with her. This book has some really nuanced discussions of what is important in life. And I Many thanks to Bloomsbury for the ARC! I often read YA contemporary to not have to think too much for a little while. But sometimes, you come across a book that really makes you think. This is not a book that everyone will love. It's really messy, and the main character, Nala, is not always at her best and not always very likeable. I did however really love her and I loved going on this journey of self love with her. This book has some really nuanced discussions of what is important in life. And I really appreciated those and related to Nala's struggle: activism isn't for everyone, and it can feel, especially in this social media era, like you have to be this one specific kind of person who speaks out about everything and is aware of all of the issues going on in the world. That can feel intimidating and it can also make you feel like you're not enough and like you're not good enough. Not to say activism isn't great and important, but just that there are different ways to do good in the world, and everyone has to figure out for themselves what they're capable of and what suits them as a person. Going into this book, I expected a main focus on the romance, based on the synopsis, but the main focus is actually on family; on Nala's relationship with her cousin Imani especially. One thing I think could have made the book even stronger would have been to have chapters from Imani's perspective as well. Because both of these characters struggle a lot and they go through a learning process in the book. At this point I'll just read anything Renée Watson writes.

  17. 5 out of 5

    hillary ☾ ⋆*・゚:⋆

    This one sounds like a fictional version of Michelle and Barack Obama’s love story and This one sounds like a fictional version of Michelle and Barack Obama’s love story and

  18. 4 out of 5

    Althea

    3.5/5 Stars For a while now I've been dying to pick up one of Renée Watson's novels, after hearing so many glowing reviews of her writing, and after seeing her latest novel, Love Is a Revolution up for request on Netgalley, I jumped at the chance to read it! Love Is a Revolution follows Nala who, one night, goes along to a local open mic night to celebrate her cousin's birthday. While there, she falls head over heels for the MC, Tye, a local activist and friend of Nala's cousin, Imani. When Nala s 3.5/5 Stars For a while now I've been dying to pick up one of Renée Watson's novels, after hearing so many glowing reviews of her writing, and after seeing her latest novel, Love Is a Revolution up for request on Netgalley, I jumped at the chance to read it! Love Is a Revolution follows Nala who, one night, goes along to a local open mic night to celebrate her cousin's birthday. While there, she falls head over heels for the MC, Tye, a local activist and friend of Nala's cousin, Imani. When Nala stumbles upon the opportunity to chat with him, she decides to slightly change certain aspects of her life to fit in with him, but as the lies get harder and harder to keep up, Nala must decide if it's really worth being someone she's not just to fit in. When I picked up this novel, the first thing that struck me was Renée Watson's writing style - it captivated me from the very first page and I had to force myself to put the book down after a couple of chapters just to go to sleep! In fact, I absolutely raced through around 70% of the book in one night, I was just so invested in the story! Interspersed throughout this book are short lists that Nala makes in order to help her write her college admissions essay, as well as lyrics from her favourite singer, Blue's, songs. I really enjoyed both of these inclusions and I think that they really added a fun extra layer to the story! I really enjoyed Nala the main character, particularly the love and care she has for her family. I loved the scenes where she spent time with her extended family, particularly her grandmother at her care home - they were just so heartwarming! There is some tension between Nala and Imani throughout the book and I think it was really realistic and well written (though I did get annoyed by Imani on a couple of occasions!). Then there's Tye - sweet, caring Tye! I really loved his passion and drive to change the world for the better and he's one of the loveliest male love interests that I've read in a YA novel in quite some time! One of the main themes in this book is the focus on self love with particular emphasis on loving yourself as a Black girl, and I think that this will be a really valuable addition to YA literature! The synopsis did suggest that there would be more of an emphasis on body positivity and, although it is mentioned a couple of times throughout, I really would have enjoyed it if it was focussed on a little more! Aside from that, the only reason I docked stars was because (naturally) this book is geared towards a much younger audience and the plot is pretty standard for a YA contemporary. Because I am not the target audience though I decided to round it up to a four star rating here, though I do really recommend this book for teens! Thanks to Netgalley and Bloomsbury for an eARC copy in return for an honest review!

  19. 5 out of 5

    mer reads

    3.75 out of 5 stars. This was a delight to read! Renée Watson is clearly a very talented author who can create characters with strong voices. Love Is a Revolution was super easy to read due to the seemingly effortless writing style. This story had wonderful representation and well developed characters. I would love to read from Watson again in the future. My only minor complaint is with the premise of the book as I didn't love how Nala lied to Tye upon meeting him. However I don't think that the 3.75 out of 5 stars. This was a delight to read! Renée Watson is clearly a very talented author who can create characters with strong voices. Love Is a Revolution was super easy to read due to the seemingly effortless writing style. This story had wonderful representation and well developed characters. I would love to read from Watson again in the future. My only minor complaint is with the premise of the book as I didn't love how Nala lied to Tye upon meeting him. However I don't think that the main conflict was dragged out more than it needed to be and I thought it was handled in an appropriate manner. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with an arc.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Toya (the reading chemist)

    Rating is between 3-3.5 stars. I'll be honest, I couldn't stand the MC (Nala) for the majority of this book. I think I read it so quickly just to get to the point where she underwent some growth because I was tired of her judging Black folks for wanting to uplift their community and the constant hating on/competing with other females trope. More thoughts to come. Rating is between 3-3.5 stars. I'll be honest, I couldn't stand the MC (Nala) for the majority of this book. I think I read it so quickly just to get to the point where she underwent some growth because I was tired of her judging Black folks for wanting to uplift their community and the constant hating on/competing with other females trope. More thoughts to come.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Simant Verma

    4th September, 2020: The cover has been just revealed and it is so beautiful 🥰 - Plus size heroine - #Ownvoices for Jamaican-American rep - story of Black joy. - There are actually song lyrics in the book??

  22. 5 out of 5

    USOM

    (Disclaimer: I received this book from Netgalley. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Nala immediately hooked me. Not only does she make lists for just about everything, but she lets her vulnerability shine on the page. While she may not have plans to conquer the world, for the summer she just wants to find love. Love is a Revolution was extremely character driven as we are wrapped up in Nala's lies and emotions. I loved how Watson delivers Nala, completely, flawed, a (Disclaimer: I received this book from Netgalley. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Nala immediately hooked me. Not only does she make lists for just about everything, but she lets her vulnerability shine on the page. While she may not have plans to conquer the world, for the summer she just wants to find love. Love is a Revolution was extremely character driven as we are wrapped up in Nala's lies and emotions. I loved how Watson delivers Nala, completely, flawed, and as confused as we are. She's relatable because haven't we all told a lie that seemed small, but ends up looming over us? Having been immersed in a whole group of YAs about passionate, social conscious teens, and loving it, Nala is refreshing in some ways because she's more like how I was at a teen. She loves the music she likes and maybe she doesn't understand some of the implications of it, or why it matters, but in these moments she felt so relatable to who I was. Not who I am now, but I think teens also need characters who meet them where they are now. There are still questions Nala needs to grapple with and answer for herself, but Nala just felt so relatable to me. full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...

  23. 4 out of 5

    Carol (Reading Ladies)

    4.5 Stars I love this gentle, realistic, and heartwarming story! Nala Robertson meets a cute boy, Tye Brown, at open mic night. They experience an instant attraction but Nala is worried because they have very different interests….Tye is an activist, a vegetarian, and a community organizer while Nala would rather stay home and watch movies and enjoy a juicy, fully-loaded hamburger. Nala finds herself lying to Tye to foster a foundation of common interests and to encourage him to keep asking her ou 4.5 Stars I love this gentle, realistic, and heartwarming story! Nala Robertson meets a cute boy, Tye Brown, at open mic night. They experience an instant attraction but Nala is worried because they have very different interests….Tye is an activist, a vegetarian, and a community organizer while Nala would rather stay home and watch movies and enjoy a juicy, fully-loaded hamburger. Nala finds herself lying to Tye to foster a foundation of common interests and to encourage him to keep asking her out. As much as this is a cute romance on the surface, the story is more substantially about loving others as well as yourself, discovering the things that are truly important to you, and embracing your authentic self. Love for family, community, retirement home residents, a boyfriend, and for self! In February as we celebrate Love and amplify the voice of Black authors, it’s a perfect opportunity to share that I have recently discovered author Renée Watson. Shout Out to Afoma at Reading Middle Grade for a fabulous author interview and for introducing me to Watson’s work. Love is a Revolution is the second book I’ve read having previously read Piecing Me Together. Both books were added to my TBR after reading Afoma’s reviews….thanks Afoma, the queen of MG and YA reading lists! One aspect I love about Watson’s stories (at least the two I’ve read) is that they are perfect for young YA readers transitioning out of MG or for older MG readers. One of my issues with YA is that some of them seem to be written for adults and can include excessive profanity and graphic content that may not be appropriate for younger YA readers. I appreciate Renee Watson for writing engaging, thoughtful, compelling, and heartfelt stories for this targeted audience. I’m obviously not in the target audience, but great stories can be appreciated by readers of all ages! I love how Watson shows the characters making a difference in their community and the world. This group of young people is seriously committed to recycling and they are actively involved in community service. It's endearing that Nala spends time with her grandmother at her retirement home, takes ice cream to her grandmother's friend there, and cares about painting a wall and adding art to the community room at her grandmother's place of residence. These teens are inspirational for all of us. In addition to diversity for readers, a likable and authentic main character, and a perfect book boyfriend, I love the thoughtful themes including the importance of family, family loyalty, self confidence and self acceptance, positive body image, community activism, finding your voice, discovering what’s important to you, coming of age, and special friendships with elders. Readers of various ages and ethnicity will likely find something relatable here. I very much appreciate a book I can recommend to young adult readers without hesitation! If you are looking for a diverse, gentle, realistic, engaging, and heartwarming read, I highly recommend Love is a Revolution. I will definitely be reading more stories by Renée Watson. For more reviews visit my blog www.readingladies.com (where this review was first published).

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Thanks to the publisher for providing an eARC of Love is a Revolution in exchange for an honest review. This is how you write a realistically flawed character and use those flaws to show genuine character development. I didn't think I would end up rooting for Nala. We're introduced to her as incredibly jealous of her sister/cousin/best friend Imani, a compulsive liar, and pretty judgey of almost everyone else around her. Watson expertly shows where those character flaws come from and contextualiz Thanks to the publisher for providing an eARC of Love is a Revolution in exchange for an honest review. This is how you write a realistically flawed character and use those flaws to show genuine character development. I didn't think I would end up rooting for Nala. We're introduced to her as incredibly jealous of her sister/cousin/best friend Imani, a compulsive liar, and pretty judgey of almost everyone else around her. Watson expertly shows where those character flaws come from and contextualizes them while also not just letting Nala off the hook until she tries to create active change within herself. I loved the journal and list component and how they showed us more of Nala's inner thoughts and character progression. Nala's grandmother was definitely a highlight here for me, especially with her way of approaching conflict. Nala's love interest was honestly my least favourite aspect even though I get that that's pretty much the whole point and I didn't like where the relationship is at the end of the book (I know that's phrased weirdly, but I don't want to give away what the final outcome of their relationship is) but other than that, this was wonderful.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Manon the Malicious

    *4.25 Stars* Really liked this one. I was a little bit upset with the start but I fell for the story and the main character as it went on. It was also very immersive, I could really see myself in Harlem and in the middle of the family, or even at the grandmother's apartment complex... Just... So good. *4.25 Stars* Really liked this one. I was a little bit upset with the start but I fell for the story and the main character as it went on. It was also very immersive, I could really see myself in Harlem and in the middle of the family, or even at the grandmother's apartment complex... Just... So good.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca | Velvet Opus

    A story about self-love, body positivity and that being true to yourself is worth more than trying to be someone else, for someone else. I'd have learned a lot from this in my early teens and would recommend to a teen audience. A story about self-love, body positivity and that being true to yourself is worth more than trying to be someone else, for someone else. I'd have learned a lot from this in my early teens and would recommend to a teen audience.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Brandie Shanae Bridges

    This book was great! This book deals with a girl named Nala who wants to impress a boy named Tye Brown who is an activist and is part of a group involved with saving the world and the economy. So Nala felt like in order to impress him she lied about everything as far as her being a vegetarian (when she clearly is not...she loves her bacon!), working at a nursing home (she visits her grandmother who lives at the nursing home and Nala stays for atleast a few hours a week). Everything that Nala say This book was great! This book deals with a girl named Nala who wants to impress a boy named Tye Brown who is an activist and is part of a group involved with saving the world and the economy. So Nala felt like in order to impress him she lied about everything as far as her being a vegetarian (when she clearly is not...she loves her bacon!), working at a nursing home (she visits her grandmother who lives at the nursing home and Nala stays for atleast a few hours a week). Everything that Nala says to Tye is a lie and eventually all the lies start to catch up with her. Even her relationship with Tye is all based on a lie. What do you think Tye does when he finds out his relationship is a lie and is based on lies???How Tye and Nala handles things might surprise you. Though most importantly after crying and realizing what she had done she understands that before she can truly love someone she must love herself. No more changing hair styles to impress a boy and no more lying about certain things that she just does not care about at all. All loved reading this book!!!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Trinica

    "Self-love is radical love. Today, I've started my own revolution." - Love is a Revolution by Renée Watson (pub. 2/2/21) All Nala wants from the summer before her senior year is to find a new hairstyle, spend time with her cousin-sister-friend and teen activist Imani, and fall in love. When Nala accompanies Imani to an activism event, she meets Tye, the dreamy socially aware MC, and falls for him. In order to impress him, she tells a few teeny white lies that spiral out of her control. As she fal "Self-love is radical love. Today, I've started my own revolution." - Love is a Revolution by Renée Watson (pub. 2/2/21) All Nala wants from the summer before her senior year is to find a new hairstyle, spend time with her cousin-sister-friend and teen activist Imani, and fall in love. When Nala accompanies Imani to an activism event, she meets Tye, the dreamy socially aware MC, and falls for him. In order to impress him, she tells a few teeny white lies that spiral out of her control. As she falls even deeper for Tye, she comes to terms with the person she wants to be being different from the persona she's created. 'Love is a Revolution' centered fat Black women and is never about them struggling with their bodies. The balance between Nala's self-care and Imani's social justice fight was so relevant and relatable. Even more than the romance, I enjoyed seeing Nala's relationship with her estranged mother, grandmother, and Aunts. Thanks to Netgalley for the free ARC in exchange for an honest review!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Darya

    Thank you Bloomsbury & NetGalley for sending me an ARC of Love Is a Revolution by Renée Watson. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Wow. Wow. Wow. My heart is wrenched. My perspective is transformed. I truly wish I could get a physical copy of this book and just never ever let it go. I put off reading this book for a while because I wanted to go into the book unbiased. As someone who is a woman of colour and plus-sized (or fat, as the main character Nala's cousin, would say with no shame in her Thank you Bloomsbury & NetGalley for sending me an ARC of Love Is a Revolution by Renée Watson. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Wow. Wow. Wow. My heart is wrenched. My perspective is transformed. I truly wish I could get a physical copy of this book and just never ever let it go. I put off reading this book for a while because I wanted to go into the book unbiased. As someone who is a woman of colour and plus-sized (or fat, as the main character Nala's cousin, would say with no shame in her tone) I really wanted to form a holistic opinion and honestly was scared I wouldn't feel accurately and honestly represented, but how wrong I was. I want to start this off by saying the sypnosis doesn't do this book justice. This to me at least was not a girl who changes herself for a guy who she likes. THIS IS A GIRL WHO CHANGES HERSELF TO GROW TO BECOME THE PERSON SHE WANTS TO BE AND WANTS TO LOVE. This is a revolution. Love Is a Revolution follows Nala, a black teen girl from Harlem as she lives through her summer before senior year. We watch her fall and fly, succeed and kinda awkwardly fail as she tries to figure out who she really is in what began as an attempt to smooth over the facade she created for a boy. In most typical YA books (especially contemporaries) there is always the main plotline which is usually the romance plot. In Love Is a Revolution, we see Nala as who SHE is in relation to herself, her family, friends, and her complicated relationship with her boyfriend. My heart goes to her for every moment in this story, I was rooting for her, for her family and experiences and I genuinely have so many highlights and annotations that I could fill an entire wall with my favorite quotes and moments. One of my favorite parts more than even her relationships with others was her relationship with herself. We see a beautiful arc of self-realization and the beginning of acceptance. To me, Nala was written in a realistic, honest way. She was human. She wanted to be wanted, and loved, and thought of and seen. She had the existential crises we all have and the dance parties we all want. She was a perfectly crafted character not because I think she is perfect but because she is not just as those around her weren't. As someone who has someone in my life exactly like Nala's best friend/cousin, I can say without a doubt this is a raw depiction, and while some of the things every character in this book did upset me, I understand why it was done. There were definitely sections in the book (mostly in the beginning) where Nala was a very anti girl to her peers out of jealousy or insecurity which was addressed and honestly, as much as I am very much girls supporting girls, I also know it is very hard to unlearn the negativity and shame culture that is forced on us by media. Now on a more personal note. THANK YOU RENÉE WATSON, THANK YOU. Thank you for affirming to me I am not too brown, too big, too loud, too much. Thank you for writing a character that looks like me, that wanted to be loved like me, who wanted to work on herself and be true to herself. THIS is the kind of book we need in YA. THIS is the kind of book that girls need to read growing up, we need so much more content with racial and body diversity that needs to be seen and normalized. Thank you for writing this piece where I felt seen. I can count on less than one hand the number of books I have read with someone like me that I could deeply relate to. Thank you.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Misty Wilson read.fine.print

    I wanted to read this Renee Watson book because I loved her book Piecing Me Together. I actually loved Love is a Revolution even more. • When I say the main character Nala lies to impress a boy, and then regrets not being herself from the very beginning, you can not picture a rom com. This book is so much more than a teenage fling. It’s a story of a girl figuring out what’s important to her and learning how to make decisions on her own without trying to please everyone else. The cast of characters I wanted to read this Renee Watson book because I loved her book Piecing Me Together. I actually loved Love is a Revolution even more. • When I say the main character Nala lies to impress a boy, and then regrets not being herself from the very beginning, you can not picture a rom com. This book is so much more than a teenage fling. It’s a story of a girl figuring out what’s important to her and learning how to make decisions on her own without trying to please everyone else. The cast of characters is what makes this book special: Grandma, JT, Uncle Randy, Sadie, Aunt Ebony, Imani, but my favorite is TYE. Their romance is so sweet! • It is everything a young adult book should be: Memorable, real characters, great examples of good decisions and bad decisions without being preachy, addresses current societal issues but doesn’t focus so much on them that it takes over the plot, a great romance, and a plot that pulled me in from page one. I love how Nala’s grandmother was such a huge part of her life and how Nala has so much respect for the other older people in the book. • As far as mature content, there is no language or sex. This is a five star read that I’ll be recommending to young adults and adults.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.