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When a banished witch falls in love with the legendary trickster Loki, she risks the wrath of the gods in this moving, subversive debut novel that reimagines Norse mythology. Angrboda's story begins where most witches' tales end: with a burning. A punishment from Odin for refusing to provide him with knowledge of the future, the fire leaves Angrboda injured and powerless, When a banished witch falls in love with the legendary trickster Loki, she risks the wrath of the gods in this moving, subversive debut novel that reimagines Norse mythology. Angrboda's story begins where most witches' tales end: with a burning. A punishment from Odin for refusing to provide him with knowledge of the future, the fire leaves Angrboda injured and powerless, and she flees into the farthest reaches of a remote forest. There she is found by a man who reveals himself to be Loki, and her initial distrust of him transforms into a deep and abiding love. Their union produces three unusual children, each with a secret destiny, who Angrboda is keen to raise at the edge of the world, safely hidden from Odin's all-seeing eye. But as Angrboda slowly recovers her prophetic powers, she learns that her blissful life—and possibly all of existence—is in danger. With help from the fierce huntress Skadi, with whom she shares a growing bond, Angrboda must choose whether she’ll accept the fate that she's foreseen for her beloved family…or rise to remake their future. From the most ancient of tales this novel forges a story of love, loss, and hope for the modern age.


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When a banished witch falls in love with the legendary trickster Loki, she risks the wrath of the gods in this moving, subversive debut novel that reimagines Norse mythology. Angrboda's story begins where most witches' tales end: with a burning. A punishment from Odin for refusing to provide him with knowledge of the future, the fire leaves Angrboda injured and powerless, When a banished witch falls in love with the legendary trickster Loki, she risks the wrath of the gods in this moving, subversive debut novel that reimagines Norse mythology. Angrboda's story begins where most witches' tales end: with a burning. A punishment from Odin for refusing to provide him with knowledge of the future, the fire leaves Angrboda injured and powerless, and she flees into the farthest reaches of a remote forest. There she is found by a man who reveals himself to be Loki, and her initial distrust of him transforms into a deep and abiding love. Their union produces three unusual children, each with a secret destiny, who Angrboda is keen to raise at the edge of the world, safely hidden from Odin's all-seeing eye. But as Angrboda slowly recovers her prophetic powers, she learns that her blissful life—and possibly all of existence—is in danger. With help from the fierce huntress Skadi, with whom she shares a growing bond, Angrboda must choose whether she’ll accept the fate that she's foreseen for her beloved family…or rise to remake their future. From the most ancient of tales this novel forges a story of love, loss, and hope for the modern age.

30 review for The Witch's Heart

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nilufer Ozmekik

    Wowza! It was freaking marvelous! This is not retelling folks, this is epic, heartbreaking, powerful reimagining of Norse mythology by bringing a new character , adding more modernist approach and rewrite the story around her! It’s unique, riveting, moving, intriguing! This is not only Loki and Angrboda’s love story. This is a woman’s standing for herself and her motives to do whatever it takes to protect her children fulfill their destinies even though her enemies are the more threatening and p Wowza! It was freaking marvelous! This is not retelling folks, this is epic, heartbreaking, powerful reimagining of Norse mythology by bringing a new character , adding more modernist approach and rewrite the story around her! It’s unique, riveting, moving, intriguing! This is not only Loki and Angrboda’s love story. This is a woman’s standing for herself and her motives to do whatever it takes to protect her children fulfill their destinies even though her enemies are the more threatening and powerful beings of the universe! She is determined to declare war against the Gods! Hurray! Let’s talk more about characters: Loki is the trickster God and most of you visualize him as Tom Hiddleston thanks to MCU! His cunning smiling already imprinted on my brain cells and i cannot erase it with any mind tricks or hypnosis technics (all girls like bad boys so we will continue to love him more than blonde who carries the hammer: no offense Chris! ) Angrboda is complex heroine, powerful, determined, gifted witch of the story. She assisted to the Gods but she was punished by Odin to burn at the stake because she rejected to share her gifts. But she defeats the death and comes back. This is not gonna be her only waltz with the grim reaper. She dies and resuscitates several times. But she’s been stripped by her powers after her fight against the fire, she’s been retreated to the sacred forest to heal herself and tempting God Loki follows her behind. He literally captures her heart. Their unconventional and forbidden love story just begins at this point. They have three children: Hei: a future ruler, Fenrir: a wolf child and Jormundgard: a half snake. Angrboda starts seeing visions tell that her children are in great danger. Even though she becomes friends with Skadi to protect her children from the imminent danger approaching to ruin their lives, she is not strong enough to defeat Odin who is determined to finish the job he started. This is unputdownable, creative, original reading experience and the mythological world the author reimagined and vivid characterization, modern, smart dialogues she crafted were extraordinary! If you’re great fan of mythologies and new, fresh , creative approaches of rewriting, this books truly fits with your expectations quite satisfyingly. I went back and forth between 4 and 5 stars but eventually I adored the characterization and new version of the mythology so rounded up 4.5 stars to 5 Holly Ragnarok, true Nordic, witchy, supernatural stars! Special thanks to NetGalley and Berkley Publishing Group/ Ace for sharing this digital reviewer copy of one of the most anticipated books in exchange my honest options. blog instagram facebook twitter

  2. 4 out of 5

    idiomatic

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. i have to assume that this is going to be incredibly popular with the same people that made madeline miller popular, i.e. a readership of mainly cis women who love ao3 and being talked down to by their authors. it is a similarly easy read. what i WILL say is ms miller occasionally pulls out a Line that earns its place in the italicized-beneath-the-picspam canon, whereas this book has the worst dialogue i have read all year. what hangs me up about most retellings of myths and legends is the sense i have to assume that this is going to be incredibly popular with the same people that made madeline miller popular, i.e. a readership of mainly cis women who love ao3 and being talked down to by their authors. it is a similarly easy read. what i WILL say is ms miller occasionally pulls out a Line that earns its place in the italicized-beneath-the-picspam canon, whereas this book has the worst dialogue i have read all year. what hangs me up about most retellings of myths and legends is the sense that the authors are incapable of imagining anything magical or wondrous than has directly happened to them. this extends to characterization: i can draw a fairly clean line from margaret atwood's penelopiad (wherein margaret atwood's seething hatred of any woman who does not share precisely her values and methods encompasses the slut maids odysseus kills AND that slutimus prime helen of troy), to madeline miller's circe (wherein the legendary witch circe gives up her immortality to fuck odysseus's son/bear odysseus's son's children/die mortal and pleased with herself about having borne odysseus's son's children, which is better than being a goddess), to this. the problem here is not just that angrboda is dull, which she is, or that her dullness comes from sexist expectations about what female characters are allowed to feel (she loves her babies! she has no feelings about their strangeness that would interfere with her capacity for Regular Mom Feelings! she has no strong feelings about anything other than her babies, her feelings about which are relatable, thank you very much!) or is deeply unuseful to the plot ('left alone she will simply sit in her house' is not a good protagonist for a standard adventure novel, the plot dips in and out through the front door and leaves - and it's not as if she has any kind of strong perspective, or the author finds any particular delight in interrogating stories through her pov). the problem is that the author has no curiosity about what an ancient god-witch might feel, and no capacity to imagine a female character with feelings beyond the scope of a sex and the city roundtable. the problem in this case is that the limits of the author's imagination include the bounds of obvious heterosexual discomfort that bleeds through the page. there is a f/f romance shoved into the back quarter with none of the author's mythic investment, but the real problem is loki: known shapeshifter, trickster god, one-time pregnant horse, etc. there are two separate jokes where loki wears a dress, both of which involve 1) a supporting character saying 'isn't that weird' 2) loki saying, with great jughead of riverdale flair, ISN'T THIS WEIRD 3) the heroine saying, in her firm steady comfortable-to-the-contemporary-reader way, Of Course That's Weird, He's Weird, He's A Weirdo, But I Love Him. it broke my suspension of disbelief completely both times, starting with: i just don't buy that that would hit literal trickster god loki's radar for weird?? the efforts to be inclusive - to understand that it is "okay" to "be a man in the dress" even though of course that's "weird" and the reader will find it so - loop all the way back around to offensive: loki (LITERAL TRICKSTER GOD LOKI) has the gender complexity of a harry styles vogue shoot and even that, the author is touching with mildly repelled fingertips, desperately trying to signal to the readers - some people are freaks like this but that's valid!!! which, again. it's regressive, it's lightly transphobic, but it all comes back from the same wellspring: the author's highly limited imagination. a mind this incurious trying to take on gods and monsters and the beginning and end of the world is frankly setting herself up.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Virginia

    I really really loved this story that reimagines Norse Mythology in a beautiful yet approachable way. I didn't want to put this one down and even got a little sad when it was over. The story follows Angrboda, a witch who survived a burning by the Norse gods and hides in a remote forest. However, her attempts to be alone are thwarted by a loyal huntress and Loki who help her start a new life in a dark cave. It doesn't remain dark for long as she falls in love with Loki and soon they start a beaut I really really loved this story that reimagines Norse Mythology in a beautiful yet approachable way. I didn't want to put this one down and even got a little sad when it was over. The story follows Angrboda, a witch who survived a burning by the Norse gods and hides in a remote forest. However, her attempts to be alone are thwarted by a loyal huntress and Loki who help her start a new life in a dark cave. It doesn't remain dark for long as she falls in love with Loki and soon they start a beautiful family. However, Angrboda is haunted by the visions she has of Ragnarok and how her children will have a key role in the demise of the gods. She has to protect them as any cost, but is she strong enough to do it against Odin? Genevieve Gornichec's writing is beautiful, yet heartbreaking. She paints this wonderful picture of a woman fated for sadness, but determined to make the most of what happiness she receives. She also does a great job showing the complexities of a mother's love, especially when magic's involved. Gornichec's portrayal of the Norse gods and goddesses is also really cool, introducing them slowly and differentiating them from the Marvel movies we've all seen over the past decade. This is not the Thor and Loki of the comics. They are darker, yet fascinating to read about as they fall into their story's roles. I highly recommend this to fantasy readers, especially those who love mythology and stories that humanize god-like figures. **read thanks to an ARC from ACE**

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    What Madeline Miller did for Circe, Genevieve Gornichec does for the Norse giantess witch, Angrboda. Known for nothing more than being the mother of three of Loki's infamous children, Gornichec brings this woman, mother, and warrior into the world's radar. An epic story of love, loss, and destiny, Angrboda is woven into a complex individual, a devoted mother, and a loyal lover, until her whole world falls apart and she must face her cruel past. What Madeline Miller did for Circe, Genevieve Gornichec does for the Norse giantess witch, Angrboda. Known for nothing more than being the mother of three of Loki's infamous children, Gornichec brings this woman, mother, and warrior into the world's radar. An epic story of love, loss, and destiny, Angrboda is woven into a complex individual, a devoted mother, and a loyal lover, until her whole world falls apart and she must face her cruel past.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader

    What a unique mash-up of genres in this book! I love a witch story, and I adore this cover! Angrboda has been banished and even burned at the hand of Odin when she is found by Loki. The two fall in love, and they have three children together. Each child has a destiny Angrboda keeps a secret until their futures are in danger. The Witch’s Heart is an epic story, stunningly written, engaging, consuming, original, and awe-inspiring. The depth and marvel to the story, as well as the skilled writing, rem What a unique mash-up of genres in this book! I love a witch story, and I adore this cover! Angrboda has been banished and even burned at the hand of Odin when she is found by Loki. The two fall in love, and they have three children together. Each child has a destiny Angrboda keeps a secret until their futures are in danger. The Witch’s Heart is an epic story, stunningly written, engaging, consuming, original, and awe-inspiring. The depth and marvel to the story, as well as the skilled writing, reminded me of Signe Pike’s epic works, of whom I am a gigantic fan. Don’t let the witches and paranormal aspects scare you off. This book will enchant anyone! I received a gifted copy. Many of my reviews can also be found on my blog: www.jennifertarheelreader.com and instagram: www.instagram.com/tarheelreader

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lucy Hudson

    This book is fantastic. Honestly, when I started it, I was a little underwhelmed. There is a slow start, following Angrboda through her everyday life in the woods as a witch who cannot remember the lives she has lived. But then the book becomes un-put-down-able. An epic tale that spans thousands of years, love, heartbreak, tragedy, and of course the end of the world, this book will pull you in and leave you with tears streaming down your face (at least, it did to me).

  7. 4 out of 5

    Casey

    I was lucky enough to get an advanced reader copy of this book, and I'm thrilled because this is a stunning, beautiful tribute to the women who are often voiceless in myths. Gornichec's prose is heartfelt and honest, and there's something akin to magical realism in this novel--yes, it's set in a world with magic, but the lush simplicity of it all really stays with you. Angrboda is a rich and resilient protagonist and the women of myth who surround her--Skadi, Sigyn, Gerd, and more--really come to I was lucky enough to get an advanced reader copy of this book, and I'm thrilled because this is a stunning, beautiful tribute to the women who are often voiceless in myths. Gornichec's prose is heartfelt and honest, and there's something akin to magical realism in this novel--yes, it's set in a world with magic, but the lush simplicity of it all really stays with you. Angrboda is a rich and resilient protagonist and the women of myth who surround her--Skadi, Sigyn, Gerd, and more--really come to life in ways I haven't seen before in Norse myth retellings. This has quickly become one of my favorite novels. An absolutely gorgeous tribute to an often silent (and much-maligned) figure, and to the power of women and a mother's love.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Breanna Spiegel

    This book utterly consumed me. When I wasn’t reading it, I couldn’t stop thinking about it. In canonical Norse myth, Angrboda is only briefly mentioned as the giantess who births Loki’s three monstrous children. In The Witch’s Heart, she transforms into a powerful tragic figure, a witch who has altered the course of the world and suffered as a result. Her strength as a mother is brought to the forefront, all the more impressive for the nature of her children. Disparate elements and canon pillars This book utterly consumed me. When I wasn’t reading it, I couldn’t stop thinking about it. In canonical Norse myth, Angrboda is only briefly mentioned as the giantess who births Loki’s three monstrous children. In The Witch’s Heart, she transforms into a powerful tragic figure, a witch who has altered the course of the world and suffered as a result. Her strength as a mother is brought to the forefront, all the more impressive for the nature of her children. Disparate elements and canon pillars of Norse myth are woven together so skillfully that it feels as though this could be the beating heart of Norse myth itself. If you love Madeline Miller’s Circe or Norse mythology, especially Neil Gaiman’s retelling, this is an absolute must read. It will stay with me for a long time to come.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Lawson

    One of my favorite books of the year and my pick for the Fantastic Strangelings Book Club. It made me cry but in such a good way.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    ↠ 4.5 stars A witch twice resurrected and the god of mischief tempt the wrath of the gods in this reimagined tale of Norse mythology. Banished to live in solitude, the witch Angrboda can remember only fire and the fury of Odin; but when Loki Laufeyson, the god of mischief, appears one day outside the boundaries of her wood on errand to return her heart, she begins to see new possibilities. Long years pass, and throughout the changing seasons Loki returns and their love blossoms. Angrboda gives bi ↠ 4.5 stars A witch twice resurrected and the god of mischief tempt the wrath of the gods in this reimagined tale of Norse mythology. Banished to live in solitude, the witch Angrboda can remember only fire and the fury of Odin; but when Loki Laufeyson, the god of mischief, appears one day outside the boundaries of her wood on errand to return her heart, she begins to see new possibilities. Long years pass, and throughout the changing seasons Loki returns and their love blossoms. Angrboda gives birth to three of their children, each one more unusual than the last, and raised in secret in the protected forest away from the prying eyes of Asgard. The witch of the woods cannot hold the gods at bay forever though, and when a betrayal severs the protection over the forest, her children are taken. To enact revenge upon the gods, Angrboda will need to reach deep into the expanse of her magic, becoming once again the very thing they feared enough to burn. Now it’s no real secret that I am a fan of the retelling, but it feels as if I have been waiting eons for someone to take a proper stab at a Norse mythology related one. Just as it seemed I may never find any, along came this remarkable novel. The Witch’s Heart is everything I was hoping for, a celebration of Norse mythology tied up in a wholeheartedly original, dark, and twisted tale. As someone who is well versed on the topic through my primary education, I absolutely loved all the callbacks to the source material. Genevieve Gornichec weaves a compelling narrative around the Norse figures we have come to know and love, providing her own take on key myths and characters. To put it simply, this book is magical. Each step further into the story revealed more depth to Angrboda’s character through the growing power struggle with her magic, to the competing conflicts with the Asgardians. Angrboda specifically, was such a flawed and complex individual which contrasted nicely with the morally grey nature of Loki and the oftentimes fragile basis of their romantic relationship. There were certain moments when I felt that the pacing did drag, but that was just completely overshadowed upon reaching the last quarter of the book. The whole journey came full circle with epic battles, reconciliations, and a development so heartbreaking it shattered my very soul. It's funny that I was waiting so long for someone to take a stab at this, that instead the author decided to stab me in the heart. I really haven't been this thoroughly wrecked by a book in a long time so I will need anywhere between 7-15 business days to process my emotions. I am also taking this book’s existence to mean that there are more Norse mythology retellings headed our way and if they're anything like this, I cannot wait to read more. Trigger warnings: death, blood, violence, murder, attempted murder, abuse, pregnancy complications, death of a loved one, injury, grief

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alexis Henderson

    I loved every word of this dark and epic novel. I can't recommend it enough! I loved every word of this dark and epic novel. I can't recommend it enough!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    I. Love. This. Book. Ilovethisbook. Mark your ever-loving calendars for February 9, and then pick yourself up a copy of this beauty! THE WITCH'S HEART is the story of Angrboda, a witch possessed of many secrets, three children (two of whom are large animals), and the least reliable husband in all of Norse mythology. We follow Angrboda through an epic, apocalyptic, deeply moving journey as she finds out who she is, what she wants, and how much power she really has. I was excited about this book bec I. Love. This. Book. Ilovethisbook. Mark your ever-loving calendars for February 9, and then pick yourself up a copy of this beauty! THE WITCH'S HEART is the story of Angrboda, a witch possessed of many secrets, three children (two of whom are large animals), and the least reliable husband in all of Norse mythology. We follow Angrboda through an epic, apocalyptic, deeply moving journey as she finds out who she is, what she wants, and how much power she really has. I was excited about this book because I love reading about gods and myth, and this book delivered what I wanted in spades. Here's what I didn't expect: * It's hilarious. Loki is a dirtbag, but he's a funny dirtbag, and the entire book has a bone-dry sense of humor that surprised and delighted me the whole way. * It's an emotional JOURNEY. This book is deeply and powerfully human, which is hilarious because there are a grand total of zero humans in it, but whatever. I felt the love and anguish of motherhood, the twisted disbelief at being betrayed by a lover, the tenderness of compassion, the sweet relief of peace... I'm waxing poetic, but the book makes me want to. * It made me want a large wolf companion like never before. * It made me ship the gods themselves, and it even fulfilled all three of my ships, so gods bless it for that. THE WITCH'S HEART is beautifully written with prose like silk, and it reads like a wise and sarcastic elder telling you a story around a fire, and I loved it. Get yourself this book, and thank me later.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Berit☀️✨

    A clever and engaging reimagining of Norse mythology. Angrboda is a witch with the gift of seeing the future, a gift much desired by Oden. When Angrboda refuses to share the secrets of her gift with Oden he burns her not once, not twice, but three times. When he still fails he steals her heart and banishes her to the Ironwoods. It is in the Ironwoods where Angraboda crosses paths with Loki with who she forges a relationship. Loki pops in and out of her life and ultimately fathers her three child A clever and engaging reimagining of Norse mythology. Angrboda is a witch with the gift of seeing the future, a gift much desired by Oden. When Angrboda refuses to share the secrets of her gift with Oden he burns her not once, not twice, but three times. When he still fails he steals her heart and banishes her to the Ironwoods. It is in the Ironwoods where Angraboda crosses paths with Loki with who she forges a relationship. Loki pops in and out of her life and ultimately fathers her three children. What ensues is a powerful and epic tale of a mothers love and A woman’s resilience. I was so completely captivated by this story. Full disclosure this is not the type of book I would normally pick up. I had no previous knowledge of Norse mythology I haven’t even watch the Marvel movies. Admittedly I was a little overwhelmed at first with all the characters and stories, but thanks to google and my buddy reading pals I quickly got up-to-date. What really resonated with me about the story was the overarching theme of a mothers love. Angrboda’s strength was admirable and her love was palpable. Another character who really stood out to me was Skadi she was such a wonderful and supportive friend to Angrboda. We all need a friend like Skadi. Loki, sometimes I liked him, sometimes I hated him, he really kept everyone on their toes. This is the perfect book to read when you’re looking for a little change of pace in your reading. A magical tale sprinkled with romance and adventure, filled with gods and monsters. This book in emojis 🐴 🐺 🐍 🪨 🫀 ⚔️ *** Big thank you to Berkley for my gifted copy of this book. All opinions are my own. ***

  14. 5 out of 5

    Genevieve Gornichec

    1/26/2021: Hello, friends! We’re two weeks out from the US release of THE WITCH’S HEART, and I just wanted to drop by with some additional info before it’s out in the world. CONTENT WARNINGS: burning alive, sutures, near pregnancy loss, childbirth (x3), family separation, torture I wrote the first draft of this book for NaNoWriMo in 2011 and it’s still really surreal to think that it actually exists and people are reading it. Thank you so, so much for giving THE WITCH’S HEART a chance.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kristina (heartsfullofreads)

    The Witch's Heart is a story filled with love, loss, forgiveness, and hope. For those of you somewhat familiar with Norse Mythology, I think you will enjoy how the author incorporated those myths into the book. Angrboda was a fantastic character and you will easily root for her. You will love and hate Loki throughout the book which is exactly how it should be. Overall, the pacing for the book was good but part two did drag for me a bit. I just felt the plot sort of meandered for a little while. T The Witch's Heart is a story filled with love, loss, forgiveness, and hope. For those of you somewhat familiar with Norse Mythology, I think you will enjoy how the author incorporated those myths into the book. Angrboda was a fantastic character and you will easily root for her. You will love and hate Loki throughout the book which is exactly how it should be. Overall, the pacing for the book was good but part two did drag for me a bit. I just felt the plot sort of meandered for a little while. Things did pick up again and I really loved the ending. I would definitely read something else by Genevieve Gornichec in the future. If you are interested in Norse Mythology or just like mythology in general, definitely pick this one up. **ARC received from publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    Generally, I do not engage with fiction based on mythologies or historical periods I am deeply interested in. I typically find the liberties writers take to be superfluous, and often the changes made are weaker than the original myths, facts, and characters and/or historical figures. Thankfully, the premise of The Witch's Heart by Genevieve Gornichec intrigued me, and the positive buzz on social media convinced me this was an exception I needed to make. I could not be happier that I did. (Minor s Generally, I do not engage with fiction based on mythologies or historical periods I am deeply interested in. I typically find the liberties writers take to be superfluous, and often the changes made are weaker than the original myths, facts, and characters and/or historical figures. Thankfully, the premise of The Witch's Heart by Genevieve Gornichec intrigued me, and the positive buzz on social media convinced me this was an exception I needed to make. I could not be happier that I did. (Minor spoilers will follow, but I will refrain from revealing specific plot points where possible.) The Witch's Heart tells the story of Angrboda—or rather, a composite character based on several figures attested in the Poetic Edda and Prose Edda (our primary sources on Norse mythology). By combining these figures, Gornichec weaves a cohesive, emotional narrative of a Norse witch and giantess who is more than just the mother of Loki's children (as this is basically all we know of Angrboda from the surviving myths) and more than just a seeress (as many of the other figures Gornichec draws from are in the surviving myths). This simple liberty allows Gornichec to connect various (and often contradictory) events and tales into an impressively thought-out and logical canon. But a novel can hardly survive on thorough research, clever retellings, and contemporary subversions. The Witch's Heart has all these, but its most accomplished feat is the emotional weight the story of its protagonist carries. In this take on Norse mythology, Angrboda has escaped Asgard after having her heart cut out and being burned alive (three times!) and taken refuge at the far end of the world. A chance meeting with another giantess and a budding romance with everyone's favorite Norse misfit, Loki, sets Angrboda on a path of self-(re)discovery. And that journey is not just an unraveling of Angrboda's past, but a moving tale of the complex relationships the reclusive protagonist forms with her lovers, friends, children, and even her enemies. This is the essence of the novel, and unlike so many stories (particularly fantasy and mythology-based stories), none of the supporting cast is one-note or even your classic good guy or bad guy. These characters, almost all deities of a sort, are among the most human characters I've ever experienced, none perhaps more so than Loki. As an aside, I have a personal fascination with Loki. He is one of the most prominent characters in the surviving Norse myths, but seems to defy most cultural norms of men during the Viking Age (he's genderfluid, is a mother as well as a father, rarely fights, etc.), yet is also Odin's blood brother, but also (perhaps unsurprisingly) was most definitely never worshiped or revered. Needless to say, he is a compelling god—and Gornichec not only captures the spirit of Loki but somehow manages to deepen his complexity. Loki is often thought of as a trickster or the god of mischief, and Gornichec does not shy away from this reputation. In one of my favorite explorations of the character, she never seems to provide an actual reason (at least initially) why he creates trouble, other than that he is bored. This does so much to convey what type of individual Loki is, and yet also tells us frustratingly little about any ulterior motives he may have, which makes him all the more fun to read about when he's on the page. This is to say nothing of his banter with Angrboda, which is equal parts hilarious and exasperating. Or to say anything of the pair's actual relationship. I have such a hard time sympathizing with neglectful or abusive romantic partners in novels (Loki is more neglectful here), and any displays of love or redemption writers typically try to create with those characters only makes me roll my eyes, but Gornichec really makes you believe Loki is sincere during his tender moments, and there was one such line in the book in particular that floored me, despite all the earlier instances of Loki's absence and seeming disregard for Angrboda's growing needs. Every relationship Angrboda forms, particularly with her close friend, Skadi, and her daughter, is treated with as much care and complication, but for the sake of brevity and spoilers, you will have to discover those for yourself. Suffice it to say, if you enjoy Norse mythology or are just looking for a fantasy-based novel with some of the deepest, most interesting character writing currently available, I cannot recommend The Witch's Heart highly enough. I will add a few extra impressions here that are less about the emotional impact of the novel and more about the faithfulness to the source material I picked up on. Feel free to quit reading here if you're not as interested in the Norse mythology aspects of the novel: - Like virtually every novel, there are some moments where the "show, don't tell" rule is broken to move us from one major event to the next. I have no idea if this was intentional, but these moments of the novel read a bit like the actual sagas, and it seemed to me to reveal Gornichec's devotion and love for Old Norse texts. - Many of the more popular myths happen off-page and are told to us through characters sharing stories, which feels like an homage to the fact that this is how many of the myths and sagas unfold. More importantly, there are almost no authorial liberties taken with these myths. Beyond combining Angrboda with other characters (Gullveig/Heid, Hyrrokin, etc.), I did not notice any major liberties taken. - This feels like a love letter of sorts to the myths and characters themselves. Since we know so little about almost all of the characters who appear in the myths (many of whom are little more than name-dropped), there is a lot of room for creative license without tampering with the original stories, and Gornichec does this beautifully. The characters we do know a lot about (Odin, Loki, Thor) appear here much as they do in the myths, and the ones we don't (Angrboda, Skadi...and virtually everyone else) are provided the same level of depth the myths provide characters like Odin and Loki. It is obvious Gornichec treasures these characters, and there are few authors better suited to tell their stories today. - As a quick note, while the novel is faithful to the myths, it is still very much a contemporary novel, and it does not seem much attempt was made to preserve any sort of archaic language. This is by no means a bad thing, but worth noting if that is the sort of novel you're looking for.

  17. 4 out of 5

    J.S. Dewes

    This book was absolutely incredible. I’m not sure the experience can be adequately put into words, but I’m going to give it my best shot. :) The Witch’s Heart features a captivating plot, an expansive cast of characters, incredible dialogue, and it abounds with humor and heart. It takes the broad strokes of mythology you’re familiar with and humanizes it, shaping it into a fascinating perspective that roots you in its grasp and pulls you along to the riveting, powerful ending. Normally in a premis This book was absolutely incredible. I’m not sure the experience can be adequately put into words, but I’m going to give it my best shot. :) The Witch’s Heart features a captivating plot, an expansive cast of characters, incredible dialogue, and it abounds with humor and heart. It takes the broad strokes of mythology you’re familiar with and humanizes it, shaping it into a fascinating perspective that roots you in its grasp and pulls you along to the riveting, powerful ending. Normally in a premise that covers such an expansive timeframe, I would feel distanced from the characters and story, but that couldn’t have been further from the case with The Witch’s Heart. Gornichec effortlessly traverses time and space with incredible pacing, prose, and stylistic choices, while maintaining a deep and thoughtful connection to the main character Angrboda, whose own keen emotional intelligence allows the reader insight into the amazing cast of characters she interacts with. Really, I can’t use the word “incredible” enough! It’s one of those books that holds a section of your brain hostage and pesters you until you finish it, then sticks with you for a long time after. Bravo to Gornichec on this fantastic debut. I can’t wait to see what she writes next!

  18. 5 out of 5

    TRS

    I read this in one day and I am emotionally wrecked. One of the best books I've read in awhile I read this in one day and I am emotionally wrecked. One of the best books I've read in awhile

  19. 4 out of 5

    H.M. Long

    The Witch's Heart is immersive and rich, delivering the familiar tales of Norse mythology from the fresh perspective of Angrboda, wife of Loki and Mother of Monsters. Angrboda is an honest and relatable protagonist, unyielding in the face of burnings and betrayal and challenges - and the gods who brought them about. Even the secondary characters are incredibly well-developed and vivid, from the multi-faceted trickster, Loki, to the buff bi bestie with a sword who may or may not be out to kill hi The Witch's Heart is immersive and rich, delivering the familiar tales of Norse mythology from the fresh perspective of Angrboda, wife of Loki and Mother of Monsters. Angrboda is an honest and relatable protagonist, unyielding in the face of burnings and betrayal and challenges - and the gods who brought them about. Even the secondary characters are incredibly well-developed and vivid, from the multi-faceted trickster, Loki, to the buff bi bestie with a sword who may or may not be out to kill him. I loved this book from the first paragraph on, and my heart still aches from the final pages.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mogsy (MMOGC)

    4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2021/02/09/... In the tradition of Madeline Miller’s Circe comes Genevieve Gornichec’s debut The Witch’s Heart, a creative reimagining the life of the Norse mythological figure Angrboda. The world may know her as the lover of Loki and the mother of monsters, but this novel seeks to present her as something more—a fiercely passionate and driven woman who will do anything to protect her children. In the beginning is fire and death; Odin the 4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2021/02/09/... In the tradition of Madeline Miller’s Circe comes Genevieve Gornichec’s debut The Witch’s Heart, a creative reimagining the life of the Norse mythological figure Angrboda. The world may know her as the lover of Loki and the mother of monsters, but this novel seeks to present her as something more—a fiercely passionate and driven woman who will do anything to protect her children. In the beginning is fire and death; Odin the All-Father is angered by a witch who denies him access to any more magic, so he punishes her by tearing out her heart and burning her at the stake. Thanks to her powers though, she was able to survive but just barely. Weakened and wounded, she retreats to the forest at the edge of world where she can be left unbothered and alone. However, this new life of seclusion was interrupted when the trickster god Loki, having found the witch’s missing heart, decided to seek her out to return it. The two of them end up falling in love, and in time, three children are born from their marriage—Hel, who will later rule over the realm of the dead; Fenrir, the monstrous wolf; and Jormungand, the world serpent. All three of them, in some way, are prophesied to play a part in the coming of Ragnarok, the final destruction of the world, but to Angrboda, her children are her life and happiness. For their protection, she decides to raise them alone in the quiet and peaceful forest, shielding them away from the world of their father, who darts in and out of their lives as he pleases. But soon, the nightmares and visions start to become too much, and it is only a matter of time before prophesy catches up to Angrboda and her children, setting in motion a chain of events that will test her courage and will to overcome insurmountable challenges. If you enjoy mythological fantasy and beautiful retellings, then you will love The Witch’s Heart. One does not even need to know much about Norse mythology to appreciate this novel, since at its core, the story is really more a character study of Angrboda than a rehash of the events that lead to Ragnarok. We begin with a low-key introduction to the protagonist, who simply wishes to live a quiet life as she recovers from the horrific ordeal of her burning. Still, even then, readers can sense the strength and powerful personality behind the character, which is only more apparent once Loki enters the picture. The dialogue is heavy early on, but it is also sublimely written, especially the banter between the trickster and our girl Angrboda, who is able to match her lover’s wit with a fiery intelligence and punchiness of her own. Then there are the themes of love, friendship, and motherhood, which made this book an even greater joy to read. Little is written and known about Angrboda compared to her more famous husband and children, so in many ways, this gave the author more freedom and creativity to explore the character. What Angrboda wants is what any loving mother wants—to see her children thrive and be happy. When that is threatened, the results were gut-wrenching and difficult to read. Ultimately, The Witch’s Heart might be retelling of mythological events and figures, but its main character’s motivations and feelings are all human, and the theme of the devoted mother was the one that came through strongest of all. In addition to blending the myth with fiction, Gornichec managed to weave in layers of heartfelt emotion and meaning on top of the narrative, and the result is a very personal and relatable tale. Overall, I found this novel to be a poignant and magical read. No doubt it’s a must for fans of mythological fantasy and retellings, but I have a feeling it will also speak to anyone who enjoys multilayered and character-focused stories of family and friendships. Crafted with no small amount of dedication and skill, The Witch’s Heart dazzled me, and I will be watching out for the author’s future work with great interest. Audiobook Comments: My first impression of Jayne Entwistle’s performance was that her voice might have sounded a little too flat and mellow for Angrboda, but as the story went on, I think it became a better match as I gained a deeper appreciation and understanding for the character.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Maja - BibliophiliaDK ✨

    NORSE MYTHOLOGY MADE FEMINIST! As a Dane, I am somewhat well versed in Norse Mythology (it being the mythology of my ancestors, after all) but I hadn't ever really connected with the witch, Angrboda. Perhaps because she is, in traditional Norse Mythology, never really described as anything more than the mother of Hel, Fenrir and the Midgard Serpent. So I was excited to see her expanded as a full fletched character. While you can't exactly call this 'accurate' - it is mainly a work of fiction - it NORSE MYTHOLOGY MADE FEMINIST! As a Dane, I am somewhat well versed in Norse Mythology (it being the mythology of my ancestors, after all) but I hadn't ever really connected with the witch, Angrboda. Perhaps because she is, in traditional Norse Mythology, never really described as anything more than the mother of Hel, Fenrir and the Midgard Serpent. So I was excited to see her expanded as a full fletched character. While you can't exactly call this 'accurate' - it is mainly a work of fiction - it felt authentic and real. 👍 What I Liked 👍 Angrboda: Finally! Angrboda is a woman in her own right! Not just because of who she partnered up with or gave birth to. She has a story of her own, which has here been told masterfully by Gornechic. This not a story you will ever see in any 'official' books on Norse Mythology, but it still felt like it could have been. It felt very authentic and Angrboda was the deserving center of the story. Goddeses: It was such a treasure to see how many other goddesses, like Skadi, Gerd and Freya, was given more attention as well. They had wills, desires and ambitions of their own. Too often we tend to think of Norse goddesses in terms of the men in their lives - here they are characters in their own right. Loki: If you only know Loki from the MCU, you don't know very much about him. Yes, he is a trickster in original Norse Mythology, but never really in a sinister way (except for that one time with Baldr, though....) I felt that this book did a very good job of showing Loki as he truly was - but also to expand on his character. He was more complex in this book. We get to see under his skin, to get some kind of explanation for why he behaves as he does. And we see how many different faces he has. It was very fascinating. Relationship: There are several noteworthy relationships in this book, but I particularly liked Loki and Angrboda, Loki and Hel and Angrboda and Skadi. Loki and Angrboda had a very untraditional relationship, and while Loki never gave her all she deserved, it was clear that he was really dependent on her and truly cared for her. It was a side of Loki, that is not usually shown in the original mythology. And the relationship he has with baby Hel is so adorable! The relationship between Skadi and Angrboda is definitely one built on trust and respect, which is the best kind there is. 👎 What I Disliked 👎 Circe: The only thing that bothered me a bit was how much this book reminded me of Circe by Madeline Miller. If you scratch out the names of each book, you're pretty much left with the same story. A witch lives alone in a secluded place, only sporadically visited by others. She meets a man, who gives her less than she wants - but who also gives her the biggest gift, a child. After the birth of the child, she learns that motherhood was her calling all along. See? Pretty much the same book... Follow me for more book loving content! Blog ✨ Facebook ✨ Instagram ✨ Twitter Blog Post: 15 Books to Read if You Love Jane Austen

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 4.5 stars I loved this book! In The Witch's Heart, Gornichec tells the story of the witch Angroba (previously known as Gullveig). Angroba is a powerful witch who uses seid to see into the future. The voice of Angroba was ethereal and otherworldy, and it fit her because she is an ancient being. Although Angroba is burned at the stake three times by Odin, she manages to survive and escapes. Loki finds her in the forest and returns her heart to her. Angroba bears three children with Loki: Hel, Fenr 4.5 stars I loved this book! In The Witch's Heart, Gornichec tells the story of the witch Angroba (previously known as Gullveig). Angroba is a powerful witch who uses seid to see into the future. The voice of Angroba was ethereal and otherworldy, and it fit her because she is an ancient being. Although Angroba is burned at the stake three times by Odin, she manages to survive and escapes. Loki finds her in the forest and returns her heart to her. Angroba bears three children with Loki: Hel, Fenrir, and Jormungandr. Angroba's happy marriage to Loki is destroyed when Loki calls their children "monsters" and Loki's wife on Asgard, Sigyn, echoes that thought. Angroba must do what she can to protect her children from Odin and from the upcoming Ragnarok. Gornichec manages to make these well known figures from Norse mythology feel real and almost human. I loved the relationship between Angroba and Skadi, and I thought their scenes were beautifully written. The only thing that I think could have been improved would be the structure of the book. It is divided into three parts, but the lack of chapters did not help with the story's pacing. It felt long at parts, and it was hard to find a good place to stop reading. For fans of Circe by Madeline Miller and Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman. Thank you to NetGalley for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Chelsey

    As soon as I met Angrboda, I was in. This story is a retelling of Norse Mythology and Ragnarok and how the characters make everything come to pass. The novel is also really about love and different kinds of love. Angrboda knows magic and she teaches it to Odin, except he wants to know the future. When Angrboda refuses to teach him prophecy, the gods burn her thrice and stake her heart and thus begins a story that grabs you and doesn't let you go. I read this over just two days and when I wasn't As soon as I met Angrboda, I was in. This story is a retelling of Norse Mythology and Ragnarok and how the characters make everything come to pass. The novel is also really about love and different kinds of love. Angrboda knows magic and she teaches it to Odin, except he wants to know the future. When Angrboda refuses to teach him prophecy, the gods burn her thrice and stake her heart and thus begins a story that grabs you and doesn't let you go. I read this over just two days and when I wasn't reading it I was trying to get back to reading it. I loved how real all of the characters felt and the relationships between everyone. This isn't any Norse retelling you've ever read, 2021 won't know what hit it! Also, we never get to see Ragnarok in most tales, this isn't most tales...

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lizy

    Thanks to the publisher and to Netgalley for getting me an ARC for review! I have had this book on my radar for months and was so, so excited to have a chance to read it. I wrote a much longer, gushier review here. This is the story of Angrboda Iron-Witch, Sorrow-Bringer, first wife of Loki and mother of “monsters.” This is the story of a woman thrice burned, thrice reborn. This is the story of the gods who lived before Asgard and the gods who lived after. This is the story of Ragnarok. Gornichec Thanks to the publisher and to Netgalley for getting me an ARC for review! I have had this book on my radar for months and was so, so excited to have a chance to read it. I wrote a much longer, gushier review here. This is the story of Angrboda Iron-Witch, Sorrow-Bringer, first wife of Loki and mother of “monsters.” This is the story of a woman thrice burned, thrice reborn. This is the story of the gods who lived before Asgard and the gods who lived after. This is the story of Ragnarok. Gornichec weaves a fresh take on an ancient and well-loved tale in THE WITCH'S HEART. I had to stop reading multiple times because I was so entranced I was forgetting to breathe. This is Vikings as they actual were. This is my new answer to the question "what's your favorite book?" Y'all, listen: I am a Viking reenactor. I typically don't read Viking-based fictional books bc the vast majority of them are baseline canon without any critical thinking, and it quite honestly pisses me off a lil bit. If you want to read authentic Viking takes from someone who knows her sh*t, this is the book you need to read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Fantaghiro23

    Omigosh, this was amazing.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

    This was so beautiful and just so good. I don't usually do book comparisons all that often, but if you liked Circe, then you'll probably like this too. And if you didn't like Circe, you'll probably like this too! Find this review at Forever Lost in Literature! The Witch's Heart is a beautiful and emotional gut punch of a story that completely enraptured me and left me unable to put this story down. This is a Norse myth retelling about the witch Angrboda, who is punished and cast out by the gods a This was so beautiful and just so good. I don't usually do book comparisons all that often, but if you liked Circe, then you'll probably like this too. And if you didn't like Circe, you'll probably like this too! Find this review at Forever Lost in Literature! The Witch's Heart is a beautiful and emotional gut punch of a story that completely enraptured me and left me unable to put this story down. This is a Norse myth retelling about the witch Angrboda, who is punished and cast out by the gods and eventually, unpredictably and surprisingly, falls in love with the trickster god Loki. Although this story centers around a lot of events that include Loki or are a result of Angrboda's marriage to Loki, this isn't necessarily a book solely focused on telling a romance about the two. Rather, it is, overall, a story about Angrboda as a woman who must stand up for herself, for her children, and must follow her own heart and her own path to do what she knows is right and what she wants to do. This is about a woman learning to be her own woman and basically not allowing her fear to take control of her life--she is the one in charge. The story is told entirely from Angrboda's perspective, which really allows the reader to get inside her head and experience her struggles and inner conflicts as she also faces them. She's someone that has been through a lot of suffering and tragedy, yet has become determined to restart her life anew, free from the gods, and do things her way. Then there's Loki, and I can't tell you how much I loved Gornichec's depiction of Loki. He was so spot on with how I feel this trickster god would act. There's such a lack of responsibility or really caring about the things he does or the consequences that come out--he really just sort of acts first and deals later. And it's not that he's this horrible, callous, unfeeling god in an evil way, he just... is how he is. There isn't really any malicious intent in what he does, he just acts. And in very small, subtle ways you can begin to see where he does care about things and how to pick out those acts from others. We also get to meet Norse characters such as Skadi, Thor, Odin, and so many more throughout, all of which sated my curiosity and desire to see how the gods lived their lives during this time. Angrboda and Loki's relationship was truly a delight to follow, from its unlikely origins to its amazing in-between and all the unpredictable yet undeniable chemistry that exists between them. I loved watching this relationship evolve, including both the good and the many bad moments that exist. They are one of those couples that don't quite make sense, but somehow undeniably work so well together. The dialogue between the two is one of my favorite things in this book and I am so impressed by Gornichec's ability to make it feel so exceptionally natural and realistic--it really felt like I could be reading two partners shooting remarks back and forth at one another. It's messy and frustrating and beautiful all at the same time. Outside of the characters we also get to explore the world of the Norse gods and the antics that take up much of their time. Gornichec's depiction of this felt fresh yet also classic and full of tradition at the same time. Her characterization of each individual god or goddess depicted felt as if it could be the real story, especially when considering the actions of each god or the situations they are a part of. Angrboda's children, especially, made it abundantly clear that we were living in the realm of the gods and that things that might seem a bit odd to us are accepted as just how the gods are and that they are things that happen. Lastly, I'd just like to touch on Gornichec's prose and pacing, both of which felt perfectly executed. Her prose is almost lyrical in its beauty in some passages, and elsewhere it still flows effortlessly and made this book difficult to put down and walk away from. Gornichec's writing was light and witty when it suited, but also tragic and heartbreaking where it suited as well, and I applaud her ability to capture such a strong range of emotions in such a realistic and authentic manner. Her pacing, also, felt perfectly plotted and developed and maintained a very steady, thoughtful pace throughout. Nothing felt rushed, nor did anything feel drawn out or overdone. The pacing picks up slightly near the end when everything comes to fruition, but it is a natural and well-crafted step that fits well. Overall, I've given The Witch's Heart five stars. It's so beautiful and made me so happy and entertained the entire time I was reading it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    The Witch’s Heart by Genevieve Gornichec is an excellent novel that is full of rich imagery, Norse mythology, and was utterly captivating from beginning to end. This story brings to light Angrboda, a figure that was only mentioned in passing as the woman that gave birth to Lodi’s offspring, and passed over from there. Here, she receives an intricate, emotional, and passionate story that is so unique and impressive, the reader feels as if this telling must be from ancient sources itself. Full of e The Witch’s Heart by Genevieve Gornichec is an excellent novel that is full of rich imagery, Norse mythology, and was utterly captivating from beginning to end. This story brings to light Angrboda, a figure that was only mentioned in passing as the woman that gave birth to Lodi’s offspring, and passed over from there. Here, she receives an intricate, emotional, and passionate story that is so unique and impressive, the reader feels as if this telling must be from ancient sources itself. Full of emotion, imagery, and suspense that I was able to polish this gem off in no time. A wonderful, mythical story that weaves together a tale that I will remember for quite a long time. Thank you EW and Ace Books for this wonderful ARC and in return I am submitting my unbiased and voluntary review and opinion. I am posting this review to my GR, Instagram, and Bookbub accounts immediately and will post it to my Amazon, Instagram, and B&N accounts upon publication on 2/9/21.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Leanne

    3.5 stars I gravitate towards mythology stories like a moth to a flame. This is a book about a banished witch, Angrboda, who falls in love and marries the infamous Loki. Together, they have 3 children, and the story follows Angrboda as she tries to save her children from prophesied danger. Angrboda’s love for her children is palpable and guides the story, and I also loved reading about her relationship with Loki. It was fascinating seeing the lengths she goes to to protect her children, and her re 3.5 stars I gravitate towards mythology stories like a moth to a flame. This is a book about a banished witch, Angrboda, who falls in love and marries the infamous Loki. Together, they have 3 children, and the story follows Angrboda as she tries to save her children from prophesied danger. Angrboda’s love for her children is palpable and guides the story, and I also loved reading about her relationship with Loki. It was fascinating seeing the lengths she goes to to protect her children, and her residence is astounding. The prose is beautiful; it really made me feel like I was part of this magical world. Loki is a legendary trickster, made even more famous by Tom Hiddleston’s portrayal of him, and I adored the way that Gornichec wrote about him. He’s so charming that it’s impossible to hate him, despite his moral ambiguity. While I devoured the first half of this book, the second half fell a bit flat. I feel bad saying this, but I kind of got tired of Angrboda. Arguably the biggest focus of the book is her love for her children, and the things she’ll do to protect them… which is great… but it also got boring after a while. I recognise that this is probably a ‘me’ issue, but I ended up wanting more from her character and the plot. It also made the second half of the book drag slightly. While this book is far from perfect, I still enjoyed it and I think that it’s an interesting perspective of Norse mythology!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Milena

    The Witch's Heart by Genevieve Gornichec is a book based on Norse mythology, and it's about the witch Angrboda, one of Loki's wives. I don't know a lot about Norse mythology beyond Marvel movies. I've heard of Odin, Loki, and Thor, but I never knew anything about Angrboda and her children or any other gods. The book starts after Angrboda is burned three times by Odin for refusing to show him the future. She flees to isolated woods, where Loki finds her and returns her heart to her. Thus starts a The Witch's Heart by Genevieve Gornichec is a book based on Norse mythology, and it's about the witch Angrboda, one of Loki's wives. I don't know a lot about Norse mythology beyond Marvel movies. I've heard of Odin, Loki, and Thor, but I never knew anything about Angrboda and her children or any other gods. The book starts after Angrboda is burned three times by Odin for refusing to show him the future. She flees to isolated woods, where Loki finds her and returns her heart to her. Thus starts a relationship that will have enormous consequences for their word and the Gods. Angrboda and Loki's unusual children will play a role in the destruction of Asgard. I appreciated reading a mythology retelling from a woman's perspective. I loved Angrboda. I loved her relationship with her three children and her devotion to them, even when everybody else saw them as monsters. But I didn't like Loki. He wasn't a good husband, and he wasn't a particularly good father either. He always seemed to struggle to do the right thing by his family, even when he wanted to. He did redeem himself a little in the second part of the book. My other favorite character was Skadi, a huntress, and Angrboda friend. She was brave, opinionated, and devoted to Boda and her children. I was shipping Boda and Skadi so hard! The Witch's Heart is a unique story infused with myth, magic, and symbolism. If you want a different take on Norse mythology, I highly recommend this book! *ARC provided by the publisher via NetGalley

  30. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    I finished reading Genevieve Gornichec’s The Witch’s Heart on Saturday and have slowly been coming down from the high ever since. This book was so good, so beautifully written, that I just want to run around telling people to read the book and share the experience of reading a story that will totally knock their socks off... Read the rest of my review at A Bookish Type. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley, for review consideration. I finished reading Genevieve Gornichec’s The Witch’s Heart on Saturday and have slowly been coming down from the high ever since. This book was so good, so beautifully written, that I just want to run around telling people to read the book and share the experience of reading a story that will totally knock their socks off... Read the rest of my review at A Bookish Type. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley, for review consideration.

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