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Generation Misfits by Akemi Dawn Bowman is a heartwarming, fish-out-of-water own voices story about an eleven-year-old Japanese-American girl who finds her true friends--through the power of J-Pop! Millie is attending a real school for the first time, and she dreams of finally having friends and a little bit of freedom. She finds her chance when she joins an imitation band Generation Misfits by Akemi Dawn Bowman is a heartwarming, fish-out-of-water own voices story about an eleven-year-old Japanese-American girl who finds her true friends--through the power of J-Pop! Millie is attending a real school for the first time, and she dreams of finally having friends and a little bit of freedom. She finds her chance when she joins an imitation band of her favorite J-Pop group, where she's thrilled to meet a group of misfits who quickly become a tightknit group of friends that are like family. But Millie soon realizes that one of them is dealing with problems bigger than what notes to hit when it comes time for their performance. Can Millie help her friend, even when their problem feels too big to say out loud?


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Generation Misfits by Akemi Dawn Bowman is a heartwarming, fish-out-of-water own voices story about an eleven-year-old Japanese-American girl who finds her true friends--through the power of J-Pop! Millie is attending a real school for the first time, and she dreams of finally having friends and a little bit of freedom. She finds her chance when she joins an imitation band Generation Misfits by Akemi Dawn Bowman is a heartwarming, fish-out-of-water own voices story about an eleven-year-old Japanese-American girl who finds her true friends--through the power of J-Pop! Millie is attending a real school for the first time, and she dreams of finally having friends and a little bit of freedom. She finds her chance when she joins an imitation band of her favorite J-Pop group, where she's thrilled to meet a group of misfits who quickly become a tightknit group of friends that are like family. But Millie soon realizes that one of them is dealing with problems bigger than what notes to hit when it comes time for their performance. Can Millie help her friend, even when their problem feels too big to say out loud?

30 review for Generation Misfits

  1. 4 out of 5

    destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]

    Don't mind me, just weeping over how proud I am of my fave for killin' it in middle grade, too ♥ Don't mind me, just weeping over how proud I am of my fave for killin' it in middle grade, too ♥

  2. 4 out of 5

    Frank-Intergalactic Bookdragon

    Review Akemi Dawn Bowman is both one of the most versatile authors and relatable for me. She went from writing only YA contemporary to now doing YA sci-fi and middle grade contemporary and does it all well. The way she can effortlessly cross not only genres but age catagories is truly a testament to how good her writing is. It doesn't matter what she writes because she's just a good writer period. This is a really cute and wholesome story about found family and fitting in! I was mainly homeschooled Review Akemi Dawn Bowman is both one of the most versatile authors and relatable for me. She went from writing only YA contemporary to now doing YA sci-fi and middle grade contemporary and does it all well. The way she can effortlessly cross not only genres but age catagories is truly a testament to how good her writing is. It doesn't matter what she writes because she's just a good writer period. This is a really cute and wholesome story about found family and fitting in! I was mainly homeschooled until middle school like this story's protagonist and found her story surprisingly accurate to my own experience. The awkwardness of not knowing basic things like how homework works, using fandom to make friends because you don't really know how else to, parents having second guesses, etc. Gets the 'I was homeschooled' seal of approval from me! And can we just take a minute to stan this friendgroup? They're so sweet and have such amazing and realistic dynamics. They're also really diverse with multiple poc characters and some LGBTQ+ rep with a nonbinary character. The reason I'm not giving it a full five stars like other ADB books is because I rarely connect with middle grade books deeply enough to give them a full five stars anymore. It's not a problem at all with the book it's a me thing which is fine. Despite this being for a younger audience than me, I still found the vast majority of it enjoyable! I could see kids gobbling this up. If it had come out back when I was these characters' ages, it would've been one of if not my favorite book. But there's still a lot of it adults and teens can love about it too! Update October 2020 This cover is adorable! Wake me up when it's 2021 where there are two Akemi Dawn Bowman releases! Prereview March 2019 First Bowman writes a book about an introverted dreamer, then one with an ace protagonist, now a book about a homeschooler going to a school for the first time in middle school. At this point it's suspicious how much these books are like my life . . .

  3. 4 out of 5

    Akemi Dawn Bowman

    Hello, readers! There’s just over a month to go until publication day, so I think it's a good time for an author note. GENERATION MISFITS is a book about friendship, and family, and figuring out where you fit in the world. It's also a story about finding the courage to tell your truth—even when the world (and sometimes the people around you) make you feel small. All of my books are personal in different ways. They carry little pieces of myself, and my own truth. And every time a new story of mine Hello, readers! There’s just over a month to go until publication day, so I think it's a good time for an author note. GENERATION MISFITS is a book about friendship, and family, and figuring out where you fit in the world. It's also a story about finding the courage to tell your truth—even when the world (and sometimes the people around you) make you feel small. All of my books are personal in different ways. They carry little pieces of myself, and my own truth. And every time a new story of mine is published, the fear that people will judge those truths and find fault in the personal aspects is very real. But that's part of being a creator—you make something, however personal, and set it free. It becomes different things to different people, and there's a special beauty in that. And maybe art doesn't need to reflect everyone's life—maybe it just needs to be a mirror for the people who need it most. Like Millie, I was also home-schooled and later attended a performing arts school. And like Millie, I too struggled with all the things she does. There's a line in the story, where Millie reflects on how lots of other previously home-schooled kids have an easier time adjusting, and how it makes her feel like there's something wrong with her. And that's who I wrote this book for: the people like Millie, who struggle with things that most other people don't, and who just want to feel like they're not alone in the world. I hope you enjoy reading about Millie and her friends. I hope you feel a little more understood. And for everyone else, perhaps this book will lend you a better understanding of what other people might be going through. Everyone has a story. We don't always know what's going on behind a person's joy or sadness or anger. So be kind as often as you can. And above all, don't be afraid to find the words to your own song—and be brave enough to sing it. ❤️

  4. 4 out of 5

    Fanna

    October 14, 2020: I loved Summer Bird Blue so much and now that Bowman is giving us a MG, I'm sure it's gonna be amazin' October 14, 2020: I loved Summer Bird Blue so much and now that Bowman is giving us a MG, I'm sure it's gonna be amazin'

  5. 5 out of 5

    ░▒▓█ ᏁᎶᏬᎩễᏁ ᏖᏂᎥêᏁ Hà

    Wow, this was something special! When I read this, I couldn't believe my eyes: Generation Misfits was a mirror reflecting my life & soul. Millie, finally convicing her parents to let her go to a real school for once, is excited when she goes to a private musical & arts school, Brightside Academy. However, things don't go as hoped because she seems to mess up on everything: she goes into the wrong homerooms, writes her name on the wrong place and is mercilessly laughed at when copying another perso Wow, this was something special! When I read this, I couldn't believe my eyes: Generation Misfits was a mirror reflecting my life & soul. Millie, finally convicing her parents to let her go to a real school for once, is excited when she goes to a private musical & arts school, Brightside Academy. However, things don't go as hoped because she seems to mess up on everything: she goes into the wrong homerooms, writes her name on the wrong place and is mercilessly laughed at when copying another person's meal to be - at last - right. Her parents also doesn't care about her much, only making sure she gets second chair playing the flute. ❝When the countdown hit zero and the newest Generation Love music appeared Millie lost herself in the music and the colours and the joy from strangers all over the world. And for the next 10 minutes, she felt she was part of something beautiful.❞ The only thing that can have one qualification as 'friend' is her favourite J-Pop group: Generation Love and their fans. Determined to find her place at the school and have a 'friend circle', she starts following Generation Loves motto: always be brave and lead your own future. When Millie friends Zuki, her life at school gets better and she decides to show her parents her real passion, earn her place at the school and create her own J-Pop band, Generation Misfits. Generation Misfits is a novel that truly writes what young teens deal, see and hear when they have social and family problems <3

  6. 4 out of 5

    The FountainPenDiva, Old school geek chick and lover of teddy bears

    I really wanted to like this book more than I did. It honestly felt like a bait and switch manoever. The good: a non-binary character who just IS. The not-so-good: said character wasn't fully introduced until several chapters in. It was how did new girl Millie (the main character) even KNOW which pronouns to use when they hadn't even met much less become friends? None of the characters felt fully fleshed out to me. I had no idea what any of them looked like. Was Brightside Academy 100% Asian or w I really wanted to like this book more than I did. It honestly felt like a bait and switch manoever. The good: a non-binary character who just IS. The not-so-good: said character wasn't fully introduced until several chapters in. It was how did new girl Millie (the main character) even KNOW which pronouns to use when they hadn't even met much less become friends? None of the characters felt fully fleshed out to me. I had no idea what any of them looked like. Was Brightside Academy 100% Asian or were there students of other ethnicities attending. I was certain - at least from looking at the cover - that one of the characters was Black - which would have been cool because Black girls like J-pop AND K-pop. Instead of the cute, fluffy, feel-good misfits bond over a love of J-pop book the blurb and the cover promised, I ended up with an angst ridden, pretty depressing tale and confusing characterizations. Another thing that really threw me off was how Millie, at eleven years old calls her parents by their FIRST NAMES. What child does that? Hell, even most grown-ups don't. Honestly, every time she referred to her parents as "Scott and Jane", I was like WTF? Speaking of which, they were really messed-up parents. I realize kids don't come with instructions, but to be so dismissive of Millie's other interests outside of music. No wonder the poor girl behaved the way she did. The good thing is the J-Club brought a bunch of misfits together and they learned to trust themselves and each other.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for access to this advanced reader's copy in exchange for an honest review. This one kind of hurts my heart. I adore two of Akemi Dawn Bowman's YA novels, Starfish and Harley in the Sky. She really has a way of sharing complex characters and their circumstances. So, I was excited to see her releasing a middle grade novel. However, I was disappointed. If this weren't an ARC, I would have DNF'ed at around 40%. There are lots of good bits and pieces in the s Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for access to this advanced reader's copy in exchange for an honest review. This one kind of hurts my heart. I adore two of Akemi Dawn Bowman's YA novels, Starfish and Harley in the Sky. She really has a way of sharing complex characters and their circumstances. So, I was excited to see her releasing a middle grade novel. However, I was disappointed. If this weren't an ARC, I would have DNF'ed at around 40%. There are lots of good bits and pieces in the story. I like the J-pop club aspect. I liked the way the group of girls bonded and began supporting each other when possible. But when you put all of the pieces together, it's just not cohesive. There were several things that just made no sense to me. Some of the following might be considered spoilers to some. So, just in case, I'll check the spoilers box. I didn't really understand why Millie had been so isolated before starting the school year. Her parents seemed bright, functional, and caring. It just baffles me that they didn't recognize the social needs of their daughter. I didn't understand why the counselor didn't seem to report Zuki's parents. In public school, teachers are obligated to report abuse and neglect. Maybe that doesn't apply at private schools? It just didn't sit well with me. I also had issues with the band aspect for Millie. She seemed to fall apart under performance pressure. So, how did she end up in the highest band at second chair to start the school year? I don't know. This just didn't work for me. I hope Akemi Dawn Bowman writes more YA in the future.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Simant Verma

    October 5th, 2020: Akemi Dawn Bowman is my auto-buy author and now she is venturing in middle-grade. So obviously I cannot not add this in my TBR! Also the cover has been released recently and it is so good 😍 October 5th, 2020: Akemi Dawn Bowman is my auto-buy author and now she is venturing in middle-grade. So obviously I cannot not add this in my TBR! Also the cover has been released recently and it is so good 😍

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sirah

    Millie has finally convinced her parents to let her attend Brightside Academy, and she can't wait to make some friends. However, school is harder than this formerly-homeschooled 6th grader is prepared for, and between her parents' high expectations, her difficulty adjusting, and some serious drama in her social circles, Millie struggles to stay on top of things. When she meets Zuki and discovers their love of J-pop, things finally start to look up, but this might be just the beginning of Millie' Millie has finally convinced her parents to let her attend Brightside Academy, and she can't wait to make some friends. However, school is harder than this formerly-homeschooled 6th grader is prepared for, and between her parents' high expectations, her difficulty adjusting, and some serious drama in her social circles, Millie struggles to stay on top of things. When she meets Zuki and discovers their love of J-pop, things finally start to look up, but this might be just the beginning of Millie's troubles. There were so many things I loved about this book. I have to start with my one complaint though: when I was young and my mom was homeschooling me, the number one question she got was "but how do your kids socialize?" This is an extremely frustrating trope that deserves to die, yet I find it perpetuated in books like this. Frankly, it makes me mad. Homeschoolers are not recluses that don't know how to make friends, and it's just not hard to figure out how school assignments and tests work. One of the things I love about Akemi Dawn Bowman is how careful she typically is about twisting stereotypes and including diverse experiences in her books. This book is, in fact, full of a vibrant rainbow of characters of different ethnicities, backgrounds, social status, gender identities, and home lives. It it too much to ask for a little less stereotyping about homeschoolers? Other than that one complaint, though, this is a phenomenal read that I highly recommend for middle schoolers and anyone who enjoys middle grade realistic fiction. The characters are enchanting and the plot gripping. Thematically, it is full of family, friendship, mistakes and forgiveness, and it made me feel so good as I was reading. I'm sad that there isn't a band called Generation Love, as that would make the perfect soundtrack to this book. Thanks to Macmillan and Netgalley for providing me with this ARC.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Sullivan

    I really enjoyed this somewhat typical story about all the drama and challenges a group of middle school girls face. Five very different girls come together due to their common interest in J-Pop. Each one faces different problems and challenges, and together they help each other find the courage and tools to face them. Millie - the main character, is starting school for the first time in 6th grade after previously being homeschooled. Her parents are loving, but very strict and so caught up in the I really enjoyed this somewhat typical story about all the drama and challenges a group of middle school girls face. Five very different girls come together due to their common interest in J-Pop. Each one faces different problems and challenges, and together they help each other find the courage and tools to face them. Millie - the main character, is starting school for the first time in 6th grade after previously being homeschooled. Her parents are loving, but very strict and so caught up in their dreams for Millie's future that they don't see her as an individual, but as an extension of themselves. They put enormous pressure on her, and discount the importance of having friends and fun and making her own choices. Millie also struggles with adapting to how school works; the teachers don't explain their classroom processes and procedures and just assume all the students know, leaving Millie lost and confused at first. Zuki - the founder of the J-Pop club and Millie's first friend. She is loud, bubbly, and enthusiastic, except when she's not, which always seems to be after the weekends she is with her dad. Her friends know something is wrong as her mood swings and controlling behavior escalate, but she refuses to discuss it. Luna - the popular girl who hides her love of J-Pop from her "mean girl" friends because they wouldn't approve, and makes the other club members promise to keep her involvement a secret. Unlike her popular friends, Luna is kind and caring, though sometimes afraid to show it around them. She secretly wants to break free from them, but is afraid of not having friends. Ashley - the loner, they and Luna used to be best friends, until Luna began hanging out with the popular girls. Ashley was so hurt by the loss of this friendship, they vowed never to let themselves be vulnerable again. Though they appear tough and claim to not want friends or need anyone, they are very kind and caring and stand up for others. Ashley also happens to be non-binary. Rainbow - the painfully shy girl who hides from everyone after being teased and bullied for years, but her shyness hides an extraordinary talent. Together these unlikely friends begin to trust and support each other, helping each other to find their voices and speak up for what they need, against bullies, well-meaning but smothering parents, and neglectful/abusive parents. I would recommend this for most readers ages 9-13 as this story deals with many everyday issues most kids this age deal with, and with the ensemble cast of diverse characters, most readers will find something/someone they can relate too.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus Millie has always been home schooled by her parents, Scott and Jane, who are very invested in everything their daughter does, especially when it comes to playing flute, since they were both band geeks themselves. She desperately wanted to go to Brightside Academy, which has a strong performing arts emphasis, but when the time comes to actually attend, she is apprehensive. She finds it difficult to make friends, especially after spilling her lunch on a popular girl E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus Millie has always been home schooled by her parents, Scott and Jane, who are very invested in everything their daughter does, especially when it comes to playing flute, since they were both band geeks themselves. She desperately wanted to go to Brightside Academy, which has a strong performing arts emphasis, but when the time comes to actually attend, she is apprehensive. She finds it difficult to make friends, especially after spilling her lunch on a popular girl, and isn't quite sure how to "school", so frequently doesn't turn in assignments the correct way. She gets second chair flute in the 8th grade band, only to have her position challenged later. The only thing that makes her feel better is listening to her favorite J-Pop band, Generation Love. Things are miserable on all fronts until she meets Zuki, who wants to have a J-Pop club. Millie's parents don't want her to spend time socializing, so she lies and says she has to stay after school for academics. For a while, it's just her and Zuki, but when they decide to put together a performance group to compete in the school Pop Showcase, they attract Luna, who is a dance major but also a big J-Pop fan, Ashley, who identifies as nonbinary, and Rainbow, who has also had problems fitting in. Zuki is a little too controlling of the group, but has issues of her own, and Millie struggles with her classes and is getting D's and F's, which makes her parents angry. Will the group be able to overcome internal and external drama and be able to compete successfully in the showcase? Strengths: There are not a lot of books about children transitioning from home schooling to public school, and Millie's difficulties with understanding what homework to do are realistic. She eventually makes a multicultural cast of friends who band together over a common interest. While not many of my students are J-Pop fans (although a few sport K-Pop t shirts), this is a fresh take on musical interests. Books set in private schools seem exotic to my students, especially when uniforms are involved. Weaknesses: The happy cover is at odds with the tone of the book, which is very angst ridden. Once Millie finally finds a group of friends, things are still not happy because of all of the drama. What I really think: This will be popular with readers who enjoy diverse ensemble casts like the one in Shepherd's Babysitting Nightmares or the Girls Who Code series, and with readers who like Torres' Flor and Miranda Steal the ShowJones' Girl vs. Boy Band: The Right Track. The parents seemed unrealistically difficult, and the first fifty pages were filled with all of Millie's despair. Perhaps the target demographic will enjoy Millie's wallowing more than I did.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

    Review copy: Digital ARC via Netgalley I did not expect to cry, but the tears welled up more than once. Sometimes because my heart hurt and sometimes they were happy tears. The cover made me think this was going to be an exciting and upbeat book--and it was. But it was definitely more than just a light friendship story. Everyone has struggles they are working through. The main character has been homeschooled and now is beginning sixth grade at school. I was concerned that the book was going to mak Review copy: Digital ARC via Netgalley I did not expect to cry, but the tears welled up more than once. Sometimes because my heart hurt and sometimes they were happy tears. The cover made me think this was going to be an exciting and upbeat book--and it was. But it was definitely more than just a light friendship story. Everyone has struggles they are working through. The main character has been homeschooled and now is beginning sixth grade at school. I was concerned that the book was going to make homeschooling seem like a horrible thing since Millie had a very negative opinion of it in the beginning. That is balanced out a little later in the book though. So often young people feel like they may never find people they can really connect with and this book will be easy to relate to for those readers. This would be especially true for those who have unique music tastes. It really was fun to see the friends in all of their excitement and effusiveness about their J-Pop band and the gloriousness of finding other who share their enthusiasm. One character is nonbinary and uses them/they pronouns. That isn't explained initially so it really isn't something that stands out as an issue for anyone. Later in the story there is a conversation that goes into it a bit when a friend is seeking to understand, but it isn't a conflict it's just part of the character. Each person is distinct and they are all discovering things about themselves as they learn more about each other. They hurt each other along the way, but they also strengthen each other. Through it all they are learning to be true to themselves. Recommendation: This will be a great middle grade book to hand to those who enjoy contemporary fiction or music or friendship stories.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Olivia B.

    7.9/10 Of course, it's no surprise that I liked Generation Misfits. I love Akemi Dawn Bowman's books and her writing style. I love how she can just make everything so...relatable. I don't totally know what it's like to have a ton of pressure on you from your parents, but I do understand the feeling of wanting to belong. Millie is a little shy, and it's hard for her to speak up because she feels like no one is listening. It was really frustrating that most of the adults just assumed that she wasn' 7.9/10 Of course, it's no surprise that I liked Generation Misfits. I love Akemi Dawn Bowman's books and her writing style. I love how she can just make everything so...relatable. I don't totally know what it's like to have a ton of pressure on you from your parents, but I do understand the feeling of wanting to belong. Millie is a little shy, and it's hard for her to speak up because she feels like no one is listening. It was really frustrating that most of the adults just assumed that she wasn't working hard, but this does happen to some kids. I actually started cheering though when Millie finally stood up to her parents! I also thought it was awesome to include a discussion about gender identity. All of the characters were different, and that's good because it shows how different people handle situations. Some people wear their heart on their sleeve while others may wear armor so they won't get hurt. I also loved that this story revolved around music. I love music, but I could also relate to Millie and those moments in life where music did feel more like a burden than a gift. I'm sad that Zuki had to move, but it was for the best. It also added another layer of reality to the story. I've had friends move far away. Goodbyes are always hard, but also life keeps moving on no matter what.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Daria Dodosova

    Millie's unhealthy relationship with her parents kept me on edge throughout the book, but by the end I had reached a cathartic state where all their problems were resolved as soon as they let off steam and finally had a heart-to-heart conversation. Of course, it would be possible to pass the step with a scandal in this ladder to complete mutual understanding, if the parents talked about their daughter's feelings throughout her life, but it's good that they even crawled to it after so much time.. Millie's unhealthy relationship with her parents kept me on edge throughout the book, but by the end I had reached a cathartic state where all their problems were resolved as soon as they let off steam and finally had a heart-to-heart conversation. Of course, it would be possible to pass the step with a scandal in this ladder to complete mutual understanding, if the parents talked about their daughter's feelings throughout her life, but it's good that they even crawled to it after so much time..

  15. 5 out of 5

    LS Johnson

    I enjoyed the book but the majority of it was conflict - between kids and parents, between friends, between the nice kids and the bullies, between teacher and student. There was resolution for all of it but it came so close to the end I could barely enjoy that part. I almost didn’t finish it because I didn’t want to read one more conflict. I also really disliked, and disagreed, with the portrayal of homeschooling. So many stereotypical generalizations about the homeschool community. But I hung i I enjoyed the book but the majority of it was conflict - between kids and parents, between friends, between the nice kids and the bullies, between teacher and student. There was resolution for all of it but it came so close to the end I could barely enjoy that part. I almost didn’t finish it because I didn’t want to read one more conflict. I also really disliked, and disagreed, with the portrayal of homeschooling. So many stereotypical generalizations about the homeschool community. But I hung in there just to read about the singing competition. I also learned a lot about J-pop!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Julianne

    I wanted to love this book. Instead I thought it was fine. There was far too many conflicts with no resolutions to any of them till the very end of the book. I could easily see a reader giving up on the book because there was just too many lows. It was wonderful to see Jpop discussed and the representation among the characters. It just felt like we lost what could be more background and growth from the characters to some of the conflicts.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sacha

    Thanks to NetGalley and Farrar, Straus and Giroux for this arc, which I received in exchange for an honest review. I’ll post that review (on this charming middle grade debut) upon publication. Updated 6/29/21 4 stars _Generation Misfits_ is a stellar middle grade debut from an author who has absolutely proven themselves in the YA realm for years. I truly enjoyed this one and hope it's the first of many for this audience; the "#1" suggests that this - at least - will be the start of a great series! Thanks to NetGalley and Farrar, Straus and Giroux for this arc, which I received in exchange for an honest review. I’ll post that review (on this charming middle grade debut) upon publication. Updated 6/29/21 4 stars _Generation Misfits_ is a stellar middle grade debut from an author who has absolutely proven themselves in the YA realm for years. I truly enjoyed this one and hope it's the first of many for this audience; the "#1" suggests that this - at least - will be the start of a great series! Millie is the eleven-year-old m.c., and readers meet her when she is making a huge change: exiting a lifelong journey in home school for her entry into a prestigious local academy. As a career educator, I love how Bowman reflects Millie's challenges with the school ecosystem. Everything that the other kids know - where to look for upcoming assignments, when to turn in assignments, how to format assignments - is completely foreign and mysterious to Millie. It's easy to build sympathy (or empathy) for Millie's plight: not just the unfamiliarity with the new norms but also the fears around asking for help. Another related challenge Millie faces is her meager success with making friends. Her desire to change this is what connects her to her own personal friendship pipeline: J Club! Admittedly, I came into this work uncertain about the J-Club/J-Pop focus, but I am a convert. Bowman uses the band members - their relationships, struggles, and growth - as an ideal foil for Millie and her friends. This backdrop also allows Bowman to integrate some pretty tough subjects - isolation, bullying, identity, and child abuse and neglect - in an audience appropriate manner. Further, the characters are a diverse bunch: distinct family structures and relationships, varying levels of abuse, and unique identities. One character, Ashley, is nonbinary, and I particularly appreciate the way their pronouns, representation, broader gender identity, and burgeoning sexuality are handled throughout the novel. For a middle grade novel, this runs on the heftier side, but Bowman packs in so much great content. I am already looking forward to reading about the Misfits' future exploits! Recommended.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Evelyn

    Heartwarming, with the characters and their emotional arcs and journeys portrayed vividly, while also sensitively navigating all-too-timely issues. Generation Misfits is an easy-to-read, memorable depiction of feeling like a fish out of water and finding your own family and voice. Really well done.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    How did I not know about this book? Loved the MG voice, characters and story! I got hooked and read it all in one morning. So many issues that kids struggle with are included in this book. Definitely recommended!!!

  20. 5 out of 5

    wren

    kids these days must be built different.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    True rating: 4.5 stars.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alisha

    I really thought this book was really sweet and well written. Akemi Dawn Bowman just always writes in a way that everything is just so relatable. I loved all the characters. They were all special in their own way. I really think this book is a great message for middle grade readers. It teaches them it's okay to be different. I really enjoyed it and was really excited to get the approval on Netgalley to read this one! Akemi Dawn Bowman has become an auto buy author for me! Thanks to Netgalley and I really thought this book was really sweet and well written. Akemi Dawn Bowman just always writes in a way that everything is just so relatable. I loved all the characters. They were all special in their own way. I really think this book is a great message for middle grade readers. It teaches them it's okay to be different. I really enjoyed it and was really excited to get the approval on Netgalley to read this one! Akemi Dawn Bowman has become an auto buy author for me! Thanks to Netgalley and the Publisher for a copy of the arc in return for an honest review!!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  24. 4 out of 5

    Paper Kyoko

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Blake

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alison G.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Beth Raff

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lira

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Brown

  30. 5 out of 5

    Shamiya Shaikh

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