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Journey to the Cross: A 40-Day Lenten Devotional

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Journey through Lent with Best-Selling Author Paul David Tripp Lent is one of the most significant times of the yearly Christian calendar. It is often associated with solemn observation and preparation--mourning past and present sin and letting go of the worldly things that keep the heart from experiencing God more fully. In this 40-daily lenten devotional, best-selling aut Journey through Lent with Best-Selling Author Paul David Tripp Lent is one of the most significant times of the yearly Christian calendar. It is often associated with solemn observation and preparation--mourning past and present sin and letting go of the worldly things that keep the heart from experiencing God more fully. In this 40-daily lenten devotional, best-selling author Paul David Tripp invites readers to set aside time from the busyness of their lives to focus on the suffering and sacrifice of Jesus. Each short reading encourages believers to abide in the abundant joy found in Christ, as they encounter the Savior more fully and follow him more faithfully.


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Journey through Lent with Best-Selling Author Paul David Tripp Lent is one of the most significant times of the yearly Christian calendar. It is often associated with solemn observation and preparation--mourning past and present sin and letting go of the worldly things that keep the heart from experiencing God more fully. In this 40-daily lenten devotional, best-selling aut Journey through Lent with Best-Selling Author Paul David Tripp Lent is one of the most significant times of the yearly Christian calendar. It is often associated with solemn observation and preparation--mourning past and present sin and letting go of the worldly things that keep the heart from experiencing God more fully. In this 40-daily lenten devotional, best-selling author Paul David Tripp invites readers to set aside time from the busyness of their lives to focus on the suffering and sacrifice of Jesus. Each short reading encourages believers to abide in the abundant joy found in Christ, as they encounter the Savior more fully and follow him more faithfully.

30 review for Journey to the Cross: A 40-Day Lenten Devotional

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeanie

    "Not my will, but yours be done." That final sentence of Jesus's prayer in the garden gives every sinner who ever lived hope. With the style that Paul Tripp is known for, he communicates what is already in scripture that we can see our need for Jesus. That we would be willing and fight the selfishness of sin. Lent is a time to mourn so we can find deeper joy. To cling to the hope of the gospel. Lamentation is used to see the reality of the human crisis. Behavior modification does not bring you t "Not my will, but yours be done." That final sentence of Jesus's prayer in the garden gives every sinner who ever lived hope. With the style that Paul Tripp is known for, he communicates what is already in scripture that we can see our need for Jesus. That we would be willing and fight the selfishness of sin. Lent is a time to mourn so we can find deeper joy. To cling to the hope of the gospel. Lamentation is used to see the reality of the human crisis. Behavior modification does not bring you to the presence of the almighty. Coming to the presence of Christ during Lent takes a broken spirit and a contrite heart. This devotional invites you to that place of worship. Highly recommend. A special thank you to Crossway Publishing and Netgalley for the ARC and the opportunity to post an honest review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Lee

    Lent is meant to bring us closer to Jesus. But how does this happen? In Journey to the Cross, Paul David Tripp takes us on a 40-day devotional Lenten journey as we reflect on our sin and travel through the sorrows, sufferings, and sacrificial joy of Jesus. Sit Under the Shadow of the Cross There are 40 days of devotions in this book, and they all focus on our sin. But they don’t speak on sin in the abstract or theological, but in the everyday and practical implications. Pride, poor attitudes, self Lent is meant to bring us closer to Jesus. But how does this happen? In Journey to the Cross, Paul David Tripp takes us on a 40-day devotional Lenten journey as we reflect on our sin and travel through the sorrows, sufferings, and sacrificial joy of Jesus. Sit Under the Shadow of the Cross There are 40 days of devotions in this book, and they all focus on our sin. But they don’t speak on sin in the abstract or theological, but in the everyday and practical implications. Pride, poor attitudes, selfishness, and anger are talked about. And Tripp makes it personal by giving examples from his life and with his family. He writes with sensitivity, but with purpose. This book takes sin seriously, but its purpose is to offer a solution in Jesus. We are told to sit under the shadow of the cross. We are told to persevere in prayer. As is fitting for Lent, we are asked to fast, make personal sacrifices, examine our idols, and put them to death. This book begs you to take your spiritual life seriously, and it reminds us that getting more of Jesus is always worth it. Abundant Grace Each of the 40 devotions opens with short summary sentences, and closes with 3 reflection questions. Interestingly, Bible passages are presented after the devotional read, prompting you with what to look for in the text as well as how to pray. I found this to be an excellent format, as the devotionals serve as introductions to the Biblical text – not meant to replace or supersede God’s Word. Because each devotion is less than 5 pages in length, Tripp does not waste any words. He cuts straight to the heart and asks direct, pointed questions. Following Jesus takes hard work and determination, with faith that is supplied and fortified by abundant and abounding grace. Deeper Joy After the highs of the Christmas season, I often find myself not as excited as I should be for Easter. With this book, Tripp uses the Lenten season to take us low with Jesus on a journey to the cross. By the time Easter arrives, you will find your joy has deepened as your heart is drawn to worship. I received a media copy of Journey to the Cross and this is my honest review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jesvin Jose

    There is a lot to commend in this short book. Paul Tripp's writing is both clear and convicting. Through 40 short meditations, he encourages us to focus on the sacrifice and suffering of Jesus. This book constantly convicts because it exposes our sinfulness and points to God's rescuing, forgiving, transforming grace. Paul Tripp shows us from Scripture that God is holy, which means that our sin is serious. He also shows us that God is gracious, which means that our sin can be forgiven (if we come There is a lot to commend in this short book. Paul Tripp's writing is both clear and convicting. Through 40 short meditations, he encourages us to focus on the sacrifice and suffering of Jesus. This book constantly convicts because it exposes our sinfulness and points to God's rescuing, forgiving, transforming grace. Paul Tripp shows us from Scripture that God is holy, which means that our sin is serious. He also shows us that God is gracious, which means that our sin can be forgiven (if we come to Him in humble repentance). Grace, in fact, makes us aware of our sin. In one of the meditations, he reminds us to sit under the shadow of the cross, especially this season of Lent. For the shadow of the cross, he reminds us, teaches us who we are, what we need, who God is, what God offers us, how we should live and also gives us hope and courage. Paul Tripp also reminds us to groan and mourn. We need to groan our sin because "it is spiritually healthy to do so". He writes, "Mourning is healthy because it forces you to consider the full weight of the tragedy of sin". He also shows us that sin not only blinds us, but it also blinds us to our blindness. He encourages us to humble self-examination and regular confession: "Confession requires you to admit that your biggest problems live inside you, in your heart". He also helpfully distinguishes between the three terms "transgression", "iniquity" and "sin". I was thoroughly convicted by most of these Christ-centered meditations. These meditations consistently show us our need for grace by showing us the tragedy of sin. I highly recommend this book to all as we approach Lent this year. I hope to pick it up again during that time. 5/5 stars. "I received a free ARC from Crossway and Netgalley for review purposes, but was not required to publish a positive review."

  4. 5 out of 5

    Doreen

    Tripp starts out the book talking about mourning. After the year we had, we see more clearly than ever that there is much to mourn. Tripp goes on to say "The sad realities that cause you to mourn also cause you to cry out for the help, rescue, forgiveness, and deliverance of a Redeemer" (location 36). In this 40 day lenten devotional, we are invited to examine our hearts and remember what Jesus has done for us on the cross. The readings are deep, biblical, encouraging and thoughtful. It has caus Tripp starts out the book talking about mourning. After the year we had, we see more clearly than ever that there is much to mourn. Tripp goes on to say "The sad realities that cause you to mourn also cause you to cry out for the help, rescue, forgiveness, and deliverance of a Redeemer" (location 36). In this 40 day lenten devotional, we are invited to examine our hearts and remember what Jesus has done for us on the cross. The readings are deep, biblical, encouraging and thoughtful. It has caused me to look at things in a fresh way. I am growing deeper in my relationship with my Savior as a result. It was a great reminder that while my salvation is secure, I still need grace and help to fight the sin that remains in my heart. Thank you to Crossway for providing me with a free e-copy of this book. I would highly recommend it. All opinions are my own.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Clint Adams

    Paul David Tripp’s Journey To The Cross: A 40-Day Lenten Devotional represents the second book I have reviewed for Crossway this year. I chose it because I had heard about this author. I simply never had the opportunity to review one of his works until I saw his book on Crossway’s site. While I certainly don’t agree with his endorsement of false teacher Eric Mason, this book review does not take into account either his questionable (at best) endorsements or anything else that may paint him as so Paul David Tripp’s Journey To The Cross: A 40-Day Lenten Devotional represents the second book I have reviewed for Crossway this year. I chose it because I had heard about this author. I simply never had the opportunity to review one of his works until I saw his book on Crossway’s site. While I certainly don’t agree with his endorsement of false teacher Eric Mason, this book review does not take into account either his questionable (at best) endorsements or anything else that may paint him as someone to potentially mark and avoid due to said endorsements. Tripp gives both the book’s intent and his hope for the book in the introduction’s last paragraph (p. 10): During our forty days together, may your mourning increase so that your joy may deepen. May you groan more so that you would pray more. May your sadness ignite your celebration. And may all of this result in blessings that are too big and too obvious to miss. Tripp intends for the reader to take forty days to read this devotional. I admit I did not take forty days to do this. Therefore, I may not have gotten as much from this book as perhaps I would have if I took the full forty days. Nevertheless, I (spoiler alert) did like some things in this book. I share them in this review. But first, I give a brief word on Lent. GotQuestions.org has an article on Lent. “It begins with Ash Wednesday and ends with Easter Sunday.” That time period is 46 days (40 when one excludes the Sundays during that time period). Lent is “a period of fasting, moderation, and self-denial traditionally observed by Catholics and some Protestant denominations.” While fasting, moderation and self-denial aren’t foreign concepts in Scripture, “Lent” verbatim is not in Scripture. Nevertheless, Christians are free to observe Lent if they wish. They should just refrain from trying to make it a law. Thankfully, Tripp does not try to make it a law in this devotional. I found no less than three noticeable things in this devotional. First, Tripp has a writing style that uses much repetition (pp. 13, 20, 24, 36-37, 42, 57, 63, 98, 150-151, 161). Here is an example from page 20: 4. The shadow of the cross teaches us what God offers us. The cross teaches us that God offers us the one thing that no other person or thing can. He offers us the grace of forgiveness. He offers us the grace of welcome into relationship with him. He offers us the grace of personal transformation. He offers us the grace of a new identity and new potential. He offers us the grace of a glorious and fully secured destiny. Yes, it is true, he offers us grace upon grace! Throughout the book, Tripp begins consecutive sentences in a paragraph with a ritualistic order of words (i.e., “He offers us” from the above example). As someone who reads out loud, I can appreciate this, for sometimes I can zone out while reading. Reading the same thing over and over again often snaps me out of that funk. A second noticeable thing I observed in this book is the way each chapter ended. Tripp ends each chapter with both three discussion questions and a passage of Scripture to read, re-read (some Bible passages were shown outright in certain chapters) or the like. These chapter endings were my favorite part of the book. The discussion questions helped reinforce whatever was covered in the chapter. Moreover, the portions of Scripture Tripp mentioned weren’t single verses ripped out of context. Instead, they were nice chunks of Scripture. In fact, one of those chunks was Matthew 26:20-27:53, the account of Jesus’ crucifixion (p. 136). That’s a whopping 109 verses. Another chapter had the reader read Mark 14:1-15:39, the passion account (p. 174). That’s a whopping 111 verses. Anytime a book points to large chunks of Scripture to read, that’s a good thing. After all, all Scripture is inspired of God and profitable to equip believers for every good work (2 Timothy 3:16-17; see also Psalm 12:6; John 17:17; John 10:35; Titus 1:2, Malachi 3:6, Hebrews 6:18, 1 Samuel 15:29, Ezekiel 24:14, 2 Timothy 2:13; 2 Peter 1:1-21; John 14:6; John 8:32; 1 Peter 1:22; Psalm 19:7-9). The more an author can point to large chunks of God’s Word in a book, the better. I’m glad Tripp did that. A third noticeable thing I observed in this book is its stylistic variety. Some chapters read like personal story intermingled with theology. Others start with a biblical text before going into an exposition of the text. I found a few that were all poem/meditation before going to the questions. One of those was Day 30 (pp. 171-174): I must admit, I dislike the hardship of confession. I avoid grief. I don’t like painful moments of regret. I don’t like thinking about my sin. I want to follow you, but free from the need to admit failure. Your grace isn’t a backroom, under-the-table, secret-handshake deal you’ve made with me, where you gloss over my sin and I walk away relieved. You didn’t make a deal; you endured the cross. You wouldn’t call sin nothing, when sin is a big dark, horrible, rebellious, destructive, idolatrous, self-aggrandizing, law-hating, death-producing something. Any deal you would make would empower the enemy, encourage falsity, violate your holiness, negate your justice, crush your grace. Rather than a backroom deal, you went public on a hill outside the city, where criminals die. You put the ravages of sin, my sin, on display. In a moment of gross injustice and public torture, you hung between heaven and earth, suspended there by justice and grace. You not only took the thorny crown, the hard-driven nails, the sword to the side. You carried my sin and the rejection of your Father, as life seeped out of you. You weren’t accepting sin’s victory; you were declaring sin’s defeat. There is no denial permitted at the foot of your cross. The nails don’t allow me to think sin is nothing. Your tomb opposes any notion that sin is okay. Your suffering and death calls me to do what is unnatural for me: to grieve, to mourn, to regret, to confess, to come out of hiding, to admit my need for your grace, to repent, and to do all of these things again and again, with the knowledge that a debt paid is better than a bad deal. Sin forgiven is better than sin ignored. Grace given is better. There’s no clarity as to if this is Tripp’s own poem or something else. Nevertheless, one does see some important theological concepts in that poem (i.e., sin, grace, repentance, forgiveness, etc.). It appears Tripp understands the Gospel. He likely understands that by default, we are all born dead in trespasses and sins. Ephesians 2:1-10 explains: 2 And you were dead in your trespasses and sins, 2 in which you formerly walked according to the course of this world, according to the prince of the power of the air, of the spirit that is now working in the sons of disobedience. 3 Among them we too all formerly lived in the lusts of our flesh, indulging the desires of the flesh and of the mind, and were by nature children of wrath, even as the rest. 4 But God, being rich in mercy, because of His great love with which He loved us, 5 even when we were dead in our transgressions, made us alive together with Christ (by grace you have been saved), 6 and raised us up with Him, and seated us with Him in the heavenly places in Christ Jesus, 7 so that in the ages to come He might show the surpassing riches of His grace in kindness toward us in Christ Jesus. 8 For by grace you have been saved through faith; and that not of yourselves, it is the gift of God; 9 not as a result of works, so that no one may boast. 10 For we are His workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand so that we would walk in them. The Bible is clear that people are born dead in trespasses and sins (2:1-3). God’s being rich in mercy makes one alive in Christ (2:4). Furthermore, it is by grace through faith that one is saved (2:5-9). It is not based on works (2:9). If you do not believe what Ephesians 2:1-10 states, I would ask you please look at the Ten Commandments in Exodus 20:1-17. Have you ever told a lie? Have you ever stolen something, even if it was small? Have you ever used God’s name in vain? Jesus said that whoever looks upon a woman to lust after her has already committed adultery in the heart (Matthew 5:27-28). Jesus also said that if you ever get angry at someone, you’ve committed murder in the heart (Matthew 5:21-26). Just the mere thoughts of adultery and murder make you guilty of the very acts themselves. Please understand that it only takes one murder to be a murderer, one lie to be a liar and so forth. David said in Psalm 51:5 that he was conceived in sin. Genesis 6:5 states that every intent of the thoughts of man’s heart is only evil continually. Clearly, man has a sin problem. Romans 3:23 states that all have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God. Man is in big trouble with God because of his sin. This is more amplified by the fact that perfection is the standard (Matthew 5:48). Now, some people try to justify their sin by trying to balance it out with the good deeds that they have done. However, if you were to try that in a court of law, the judge would throw the book at you. A good judge would not accept a bribe. He would cast you off into jail. God likewise will not accept a bribe, for there is no partiality with Him (Deuteronomy 10:17; Ephesians 6:9). Revelation 21:1-8 states the following (NASB): 21 Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth; for the first heaven and the first earth passed away, and there is no longer any sea.2 And I saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband.3 And I heard a loud voice from the throne, saying, “Behold, the tabernacle of God is among the people, and He will dwell among them, and they shall be His people, and God Himself will be among them, 4 and He will wipe away every tear from their eyes; and there will no longer be any death; there will no longer be any mourning, or crying, or pain; the first things have passed away.” 5 And He who sits on the throne said, “Behold, I am making all things new.” And He *said, “Write, for these words are faithful and true.” 6 Then He said to me, “It is done. I am the Alpha and the Omega, the beginning and the end. I will give water to the one who thirsts from the spring of the water of life, without cost. 7 The one who overcomes will inherit these things, and I will be his God and he will be My son. 8 But for the cowardly, and unbelieving, and abominable, and murderers, and sexually immoral persons, and sorcerers, and idolaters, and all liars, their part will be in the lake that burns with fire and brimstone, which is the second death.” The Bible is clear that all liars will have their part in the lake of fire. No adulterer, no murderer, no idolater, no unbeliever (among others) will inherit the kingdom of God (see also 1 Corinthians 6:9-10). Sin has a very serious consequence. Thankfully, Jesus Christ came to solve the sin problem over 2000 years ago (Isaiah 53:1-12). You and I broke the law. Jesus paid the fine (Matthew 26:14-28:20). This means that the judge can do what’s legally right in dismissing your case. He can say, “This person has broken the law, but someone has paid his fine. He’s out of here.” This is good news. There are two things a person must do. He must repent. This means to turn from his sin (Mark 1:16; Luke 24:36-49; 2 Timothy 2:19-26; Acts 17:30-31). He must also put his trust in the Lord and Savior Jesus Christ (Acts 16:31, 17:30-31; Romans 4:1-25, 10:1-17; Galatians 3:1-14; John 6:26-29). These gifts of repentance and faith are granted by God (Ephesians 2:8-9; 2 Timothy 2:22-26). If you repent and put your trust in the Savior Jesus Christ, He will forgive you of your sins and grant you everlasting life (John 6:47). Oh may you know His mercy and grace today if you have never repented and put your trust in Jesus Christ alone for salvation. WEAKNESSES? One would expect to find weaknesses in this book after I mentioned Tripp’s endorsement of false teacher Eric Mason. However, when reading Tripp’s book, I didn’t find any weaknesses that consistently manifested themselves throughout the book. Instead, I found “one-off” sentences that personally made me cringe a bit (i.e., “Open your heart to what I am about to say next” on page 18 and “You live with all kinds of systemic brokenness…” on page 123). Like any book you read, read with discernment. If there were any major recurring weaknesses in this book, I didn’t find them. CONCLUSION Tripp’s devotional is one of the better devotionals I have read (and I’m not the biggest fan of devotionals). While I am still not a big fan or affirmer of Lent, the Lenten theme Tripp uses for his devotional is rather timely, for he does touch base on the crucifixion, the passion and other important events that would typically surround a Lenten season. While I didn’t take forty days to read this book, I still found it decent. If you’re a devotional person, you might like Tripp’s Journey To The Cross. His constantly pointing to God’s Word makes this devotional one of the better ones I’ve read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Heidi Creasman

    Over of my favorite Christian authors! He digs deep to help us produce fruit! Started it on Ash Wednesday, so I finished a week early, but now I can go back and read the final week.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Annette

    My Thoughts: New Morning Mercies is one of the devotionals I read everyday. The spiritual depth of the devotional, and the strong ability to resonate my life to Tripp’s writings is nourishing, applicable, convicting, and uplifting. Paul David Tripp is one of my favorite Christian authors. I also enjoy watching his brief teachings on video via Facebook. When I saw the opportunity to read and review Journey to The Cross I didn’t hesitate. My church denomination background didn’t include Lenten. We had My Thoughts: New Morning Mercies is one of the devotionals I read everyday. The spiritual depth of the devotional, and the strong ability to resonate my life to Tripp’s writings is nourishing, applicable, convicting, and uplifting. Paul David Tripp is one of my favorite Christian authors. I also enjoy watching his brief teachings on video via Facebook. When I saw the opportunity to read and review Journey to The Cross I didn’t hesitate. My church denomination background didn’t include Lenten. We had an Easter service but no mention of Lenten. I affiliated the word with Catholicism. Through years of reading and having friends of other background denominations I became familiar with Lenten. The church I am now attending has services for Lenten Sundays. They have services during the Holy Week leading up to Easter. One of the first quotes I love from this book is in the introduction. From the Sermon on the Mount, Christ taught, “Blessed are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted.” Matthew 5: 4. ESV. “Mourning means you recognize the most important reality in the human existence, sin. Mourning means you have been hit by the weight of what it has done to you and to every one you know. Mourning says you have considered the devastating fact that life right here, right now, is one big spiritual war. Mourning means that you have come to realize, as you get up in the morning, that once again you will be greeted with a catalog of temptations. Mourning means you know that there really are spiritual enemies out there meaning to do you harm. Mourning results when you confess that there are places where your heart still wanders.” I have cried more in the past year over those who don’t know Christ Jesus than at any other time in life. I have cried more in the past year over those who suffer. I have cried more in the past year because of the effect of sin in the world. I believe it is possible that I have developed a deeper understanding (only because of the Holy Spirit) of what sin has done. Easter reminds me sin doesn’t have the final word. Favorite take-aways from Journey To The Cross. In Day 1, Tripp explains when he was a young person he didn’t realize sin’s impact on him and the world. Until that moment, he didn’t understand his sin or the tremendous blessing of Christ’s saving grace. He confessed and prayed for God’s forgiveness. This is the correct posture for all people. To agree, acknowledge, and humbly admit we sin and need Christ Jesus’s redeeming grace. I love Tripp’s honesty about his early struggle. Day 2 examines several points I learned from “the shadow of the cross.” A few examples of these six points: 1. “The shadow of the cross teaches us who we are.” 2. “The shadow of the cross teaches us what we need.” 3. “The shadow of the cross teaches us who God is.” Day 7 told me it is healthy to mourn. I’m so thankful it’s healthy to cry and mourn. Mourning makes us/me “cry out for a restorer.” Christ Jesus is the Restorer. Day 15 teaches about spiritual warfare, stumbling blocks, and idols. Christians can be active in volunteering at church. They can attend every worship service. They can have an understanding of the Bible stories. However, Christians can still worship idols. There is an inner conflict inside all people. “This is where the spiritual war rages. It always rages at the level of the thoughts and desires of your heart. It is always deeper than behavior.” In Day 21, people tend to “excuse,” “deny,” and “minimize,” sin. Instead we are to “confess.” “What is confession? Confession is admitting personal responsibility for your words and actions, without excuse of any kind or shifting the blame to anyone else. Confession is a welcome into a deeper appreciation of the presence, promises, and grace of God.” Chapter 22 has several questions to help reveal the heart. For example, “When do I tend to question God’s love?” Chapter 28 explains Christ “sympathizes” and identifies with my/our struggles and suffering. Jesus responds with perfect tenderness, love, and God’s redeeming grace. “Since then we have a great high priest who has passed through the heavens, Jesus, the Son of God, let us hold fast our confession. For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin. Let us then with confidence draw near to the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need.” Hebrews 4:16-18. ESV. Bible verse links courtesy of Bible Gateway. It is difficult to give the page numbers for the above quotes because it’s an e-book. Source: I received a complimentary e-book copy from Crossway. I am not required to write a positive review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bill Pence

    I’ve enjoyed a few of Paul Tripp’s devotionals, my favorite being his “New Morning Mercies: A Daily Gospel Devotional”. His latest devotional gives us 40 readings, some in poetry form, leading up to Easter. Each reading begins a short statement, which may have originally been one of the author’s tweets. He suggests using this devotional as your stimulus and guide as you stop, consider, mourn, confess, pray, and give your heart to thanksgiving. Through these readings, and the “Reflection Question I’ve enjoyed a few of Paul Tripp’s devotionals, my favorite being his “New Morning Mercies: A Daily Gospel Devotional”. His latest devotional gives us 40 readings, some in poetry form, leading up to Easter. Each reading begins a short statement, which may have originally been one of the author’s tweets. He suggests using this devotional as your stimulus and guide as you stop, consider, mourn, confess, pray, and give your heart to thanksgiving. Through these readings, and the “Reflection Questions” included at the end of each selection, we follow Jesus on his journey to the cross. The author writes that the horrible, public sacrifice of Jesus should ignite not only our celebration, but also our mourning. This is a devotional of celebration and self-examination that my wife and I enjoyed reading and discussing during this season of Lent. Below are 25 helpful quotes from the book: 1. The cross preaches that sin is our problem and that rescuing, forgiving, transforming, and delivering grace is the only medicine that will provide the cure we all need. 2. The cross teaches us that God doesn’t look at sinners with disdain or disgust, but with generous and tender love. 3. The cross teaches us that we do not have to clean ourselves up to come to God; we only need to come in humble confession. 4. The cross allows unholy people to look in the face of a holy God and have hope. 5. The cross teaches us that God offers us the one thing that no other person or thing can. He offers us the grace of forgiveness. 6. The empty tomb stands as an eternal promise to you that God will always finish what he has begun in you and for you. 7. The empty tomb is a promise that God will never leave his redemptive work half done. 8. Anyone who argues against his own need of grace is in grave spiritual danger. 9. Humble, honest, specific, heart-felt confession is the doorway to peace within yourself, peace with God, peace with your neighbor, and a life of ongoing growth and fruitfulness. 10. Lent is all about pointing the finger in the right direction. It is about humble self-examination, honest confession, and grief over sin that causes you to seek and celebrate the grace Jesus was willing to suffer and die for. 11. Every moment in the life of Christ was necessary. Every aspect of his suffering, death, and resurrection was necessary. It was all essential, because there was no other way to reverse the damage that sin had done or to rescue those who were held in its death grip. 12. We should forever celebrate the cross of Jesus Christ as the only possible means of forgiveness. That celebration should mark our lives now and for the rest of eternity. 13. Do you find comfort attractive and sacrifice hard? Perhaps your first sacrifice this Lenten season should be a sacrifice of confession, admitting your struggle to let go of the world in order to hold more tightly to your Lord. 14. No sacrifice is more pleasing to your Lord than the sacrifice of words in the form of humble, honest, heartfelt confession. 15. Come to him this season and place your pride on his altar, confessing your wandering heart and acknowledging once again that you are a person in need of mercy, and the mercy you need is found only in him. 16. He never promises what he cannot deliver, and he is able to do in your heart what nothing else or no one else can do. 17. He will never despise one who comes to him with a truly broken and contrite heart. 18. Gratitude is a powerful weapon against complaint. It is impossible to give thanks and complain at the same time. 19. Lent is not about what you will give of yourself to God, but about what he, in grace, has so bountifully given to you. 20. The cross of Jesus Christ is the result of God’s dissatisfaction with the condition of the world that he made and of the people that he placed in it. 21. There is no defeat in the cross. Only triumph is to be found there. 22. Everything in the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus, even those things that appeared to be defeats, were victories. Each was a victory because each was done in fulfillment of God’s plan. 23. Our hope is found in the fact that Jesus came to be the final Passover Lamb, not just a great teacher and a miracle healer. 24. The empty tomb of Jesus is your guarantee of help here and now and of help to come. 25. The journey of Jesus to the cross didn’t end with the cross but with the victory of the empty tomb, and that’s a very good thing.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Laura Langley

    Each year as Lent approaches, many Christians search for just the right devotional guide. I suggest Paul David Tripp's Journey to the Cross: A 40-Day Lenten Journey. For those already familiar with Tripp's writings, Journey to the Cross will delight you with his sometimes witty, often poetic, and all the time thought-provoking weaving of words. At the same time, you will find a fresh new look at some familiar and not-as-familiar passages. But don't let the word "devotional" in the subtitle fool y Each year as Lent approaches, many Christians search for just the right devotional guide. I suggest Paul David Tripp's Journey to the Cross: A 40-Day Lenten Journey. For those already familiar with Tripp's writings, Journey to the Cross will delight you with his sometimes witty, often poetic, and all the time thought-provoking weaving of words. At the same time, you will find a fresh new look at some familiar and not-as-familiar passages. But don't let the word "devotional" in the subtitle fool you. Prepare to think deeply, to be challenged, and to process thoughts and emotions. Each day's reading starts with a focus verse, offer some thoughtful commentary and usually draws from other scriptural references as well. Additionally, Tripp does some teaching along the way giving practical principles for things like fasting. At the end of each day's reading, Tripp offers reflection questions designed to challenge you and help you mature in the faith. Personally, I was challenged in the areas of my priorities and the need to spend more time in confession and repentance as well as fasting. I received this book as a review copy, so I read quickly. Now I look forward to slowing down and reading as it was meant to be read -- over the course of the 40 days of Lent, chewing on it and savoring it. Note: I received a copy of the book in exchange for this honest review. The opinions expressed are my own.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Clayton Norman

    Some special days set aside to commemorate an event, after being observed over and over, become trite or easily ignored. To the Christian church, the time of Easter has special significance theologically and practically. However, its practicality has been lost over the centuries of observance. Tripp, using story and poem, tells the practical purpose of Easter. How does the death of a man two thousand years ago have application to my life today? What is so important about that death and subsequent Some special days set aside to commemorate an event, after being observed over and over, become trite or easily ignored. To the Christian church, the time of Easter has special significance theologically and practically. However, its practicality has been lost over the centuries of observance. Tripp, using story and poem, tells the practical purpose of Easter. How does the death of a man two thousand years ago have application to my life today? What is so important about that death and subsequent resurrection that I would want to take time, never mind 40 days, to reflect on aspects of that death? Lent comes in several months, and I will pick up Tripp’s book and read it slowly and carefully again, and may do it next year as well. My delight in the book shows the power of Tripp’s insights. I was challenged to slow down, examine my own life and attitudes, and listen closely to the words and actions of the God-man, Jesus Christ, as He went to the cross to die a sacrificial death for mankind. Tripp’s stories had very personal application. He made it easy to identify with the ideas that he sought to communicate each of the forty days. I’m thankful for the opportunity to journey with him through Lent, twice this year. I appreciate Crossway’s willingness to provide me a copy of the book in exchange for an unbiased review.

  11. 5 out of 5

    John

    A very good devotional from a trusted, gospel-centered, grace-soaked author. In this book, Paul David Tripp helps the reader reflect on the significance of the death of Jesus, the royal Savior of the world. The 40 devotional are varied, mostly prose with some selections of poetry. As to be expected some will speak more to certain individuals than to others. He writes, “The Lenten season is about the sin that was the reason for the suffering and sacrifice of the Savior. It is about taking time to A very good devotional from a trusted, gospel-centered, grace-soaked author. In this book, Paul David Tripp helps the reader reflect on the significance of the death of Jesus, the royal Savior of the world. The 40 devotional are varied, mostly prose with some selections of poetry. As to be expected some will speak more to certain individuals than to others. He writes, “The Lenten season is about the sin that was the reason for the suffering and sacrifice of the Savior. It is about taking time to reflect on why we all needed such a radical move of redemption, to confess the hold that sin still has on us, and to focus on opening our hands, in confession and submission, and letting go of sin once again. But as we do this, it is important to remember that the knowledge of sin is not a dark and nasty thing but a huge and wonderful blessing. If you are aware of your sin, you are aware of it only because you have been visited by amazing grace.” As always, Tripp points you away from self-atonement to the atoning self-sacrifice of Jesus. Each chapter ends with a few questions. If I could have made one tweak to the book it would be to include a prayer at the end of each chapter. Overall very helpful. 4.5 stars.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    Tripp's words usually provoke a response. It's rare to read something of his and not be challenged but also encouraged. This Lenten devotional is no exception. And being 40 days in Lent, Tripp's convicting style is perfect the season. Lent can be wearisome as one's guilt for regularly missing its purpose can overwhelm us. But that's not it's purpose. Jesus invites us on His journey to the Cross to experience Him, to enter into His gentle rhythms, acknowledging, as a result of our humanity, that w Tripp's words usually provoke a response. It's rare to read something of his and not be challenged but also encouraged. This Lenten devotional is no exception. And being 40 days in Lent, Tripp's convicting style is perfect the season. Lent can be wearisome as one's guilt for regularly missing its purpose can overwhelm us. But that's not it's purpose. Jesus invites us on His journey to the Cross to experience Him, to enter into His gentle rhythms, acknowledging, as a result of our humanity, that we choose our ways instead of His. Tripp encourages us in this regard in this devotional. The 3-4 pages for each day are a great length; much better than the half page ones. He uses passages of Scripture to provoke, challenge and inspire. Every few days in he uses his poetry to lift our spirits (I especially enjoyed these days). Like all Tripp books that I've read, I highly recommend this one. I'm sure this won't be the only Lenten season in which I use it. I received a complimentary early ebook copy from Crossway via NetGalley with no expectations of a favourable review.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Anni Welborne

    I did not grow up observing Lent. I vaguely knew it existed, but our family didn't participate. It wasn't until I was much older that I began to understand the importance of taking those 40 days to quiet myself and focus on the sacrifice that Jesus made on my behalf. This devotional is theologically reliable, as is typical of Paul Tripp's books. He begins each devotional with some ideas, then expands on the ideas, then provides some thought-provoking questions and some Scriptural references for I did not grow up observing Lent. I vaguely knew it existed, but our family didn't participate. It wasn't until I was much older that I began to understand the importance of taking those 40 days to quiet myself and focus on the sacrifice that Jesus made on my behalf. This devotional is theologically reliable, as is typical of Paul Tripp's books. He begins each devotional with some ideas, then expands on the ideas, then provides some thought-provoking questions and some Scriptural references for further reading. It would make an excellent personal devotional or a family devotional with older (teen+) kids. Each day is 4-5 pages long, but the white space is generous. I read a digital copy, but I plan to purchase a paper copy because I would like to review it yearly. I gratefully received a free ARC digital copy of this book through NetGalley and the publisher in exchange for my honest and voluntary opinion.

  14. 5 out of 5

    scott meadows

    Paul Tripp has continued his track record of articulating his words in ways that cut to the heart and remind us of our broken condition followed by the presence of a redeeming savior. Exhorting the reader to lean into our longings of redemption, mournings over residual sin, and a hope for a savior I found this book to be an excellent walk through the Lenten season whether your practice the church calendar or simply want a reminder of the Easter season. The introduction to this book is alone powe Paul Tripp has continued his track record of articulating his words in ways that cut to the heart and remind us of our broken condition followed by the presence of a redeeming savior. Exhorting the reader to lean into our longings of redemption, mournings over residual sin, and a hope for a savior I found this book to be an excellent walk through the Lenten season whether your practice the church calendar or simply want a reminder of the Easter season. The introduction to this book is alone powerful enough to suck any potential reader in for the rest of the lenten season. I found this book to be better than Paul Tripp's advent devotional - both of which I will likely return to in the future be it alone or with a wife or a family devotions. "Come to him this season and place your pride on his alter, confessing your wandering heart and acknowledging once again that you are a person in need of mercy, and the mercy you need is found only in Him." Day 14.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kristjan

    A day by day devotional guide for the 40 days of Lent, each day begins with a theme/statement before adding some commentary, followed by some reflection questions and a scripture reference. Most of the daily themes were focused around the various sins associated with our self-centered nature and became a little repetitive by the end (probably not as noticeable if you actually read 1 each day instead of straight through). The commentary was hit or miss for me. There was a fair amount of personal A day by day devotional guide for the 40 days of Lent, each day begins with a theme/statement before adding some commentary, followed by some reflection questions and a scripture reference. Most of the daily themes were focused around the various sins associated with our self-centered nature and became a little repetitive by the end (probably not as noticeable if you actually read 1 each day instead of straight through). The commentary was hit or miss for me. There was a fair amount of personal vignettes and associated interpretations that I just didn’t identify with or did not agree with to various degrees. There were also a few that actually hit home. Regardless, they all provided a starting point for the daily reflection questions … which also provides the primary benefit of this devotional because you can make the theme of the day personal. This is good since even the commentary gets more rudimentary towards the end of the season. I was given this free advance reader copy (ARC) ebook at my request and have voluntarily left this review. #JourneytotheCross #NetGalley

  16. 5 out of 5

    Costen Warner

    Friends of ours suggested this devotional for Lent. I’ve never given much thought to the Lenten season or the significance it can have on the road to Easter. Paul David Tripp writes clear, concise and meaningful daily devotions in this book. He has a tendency to be repetitive within in each devotion, but I think this is an intentional tactic by the author not a shortcoming. The repetition helps the reader internalize the message of the devotion and take full advantage of the pointed reflection qu Friends of ours suggested this devotional for Lent. I’ve never given much thought to the Lenten season or the significance it can have on the road to Easter. Paul David Tripp writes clear, concise and meaningful daily devotions in this book. He has a tendency to be repetitive within in each devotion, but I think this is an intentional tactic by the author not a shortcoming. The repetition helps the reader internalize the message of the devotion and take full advantage of the pointed reflection questions each day. My wife and I thoroughly enjoyed reading it out loud to each other for 40 days.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Patti Whitson Stephenson She Lives to Read

    Even though this book is written as a devotional for the Lenten season, it’s one from which we can benefit any time of the year. Paul David Tripp is an excellent communicator of Biblical truth, and I was deeply moved by the devotions in this book. It’s a book that I felt as if I needed to take more than 40 days to read. My goal is to go back and read these devotions again to let the truth in them settle deeply in my heart. Although the tone of this book is different from this author’s “New Morni Even though this book is written as a devotional for the Lenten season, it’s one from which we can benefit any time of the year. Paul David Tripp is an excellent communicator of Biblical truth, and I was deeply moved by the devotions in this book. It’s a book that I felt as if I needed to take more than 40 days to read. My goal is to go back and read these devotions again to let the truth in them settle deeply in my heart. Although the tone of this book is different from this author’s “New Morning Mercies” devotional, it’s one that I’ll be reading from for every Lenten season. I received a copy of this book from the publisher. All opinions are my own.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Darlene Messenger

    I received this book from Netgalley for review and all thoughts and opinions are my own. Paul David Tripp has become a favored author for me since my pastor used one of his books for a study class. I will read all he writes. In this, a Lenten devotion, he focuses upon the mourning of losses and grieving over the sin in our world and our own hearts. His purpose is to point is the Christ Jesus for help, especially during the days leading up to Easter. Devotional format, reflection questions for per I received this book from Netgalley for review and all thoughts and opinions are my own. Paul David Tripp has become a favored author for me since my pastor used one of his books for a study class. I will read all he writes. In this, a Lenten devotion, he focuses upon the mourning of losses and grieving over the sin in our world and our own hearts. His purpose is to point is the Christ Jesus for help, especially during the days leading up to Easter. Devotional format, reflection questions for personal journaling and Scripture references. My intent is to use this book as intended; to deepen my reliance upon the Savior. Highly recommend this book to individuals and church ministries.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mariale & Pieter Dros

    I have always enjoyed Paul Tripp books and this was not an exception.. Journey to the Cross is a beautiful 40 days devotional that will help you to prepare your heart for lent. It will encourage you to focus and meditate on the wonderful sacrifice Jesus did for us. It's deeply rooted in the Bible but at the same time it's easy to read. I really love the way Paul Tripp teaches the Gospel, how he helps you to understand it and encourage you to keep growing in our faith. I am always looking forward I have always enjoyed Paul Tripp books and this was not an exception.. Journey to the Cross is a beautiful 40 days devotional that will help you to prepare your heart for lent. It will encourage you to focus and meditate on the wonderful sacrifice Jesus did for us. It's deeply rooted in the Bible but at the same time it's easy to read. I really love the way Paul Tripp teaches the Gospel, how he helps you to understand it and encourage you to keep growing in our faith. I am always looking forward to read his next books.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Patience Crockett

    Great devotional to prepare your heart for Easter. What an excellent devotional to help prepare our hearts and minds for Easter. As a human, I am prone to forget the many blessings that Christ has given me. It is so easy to focus on what is wrong with the world, or what is not working in my life and I forget to be grateful for what is working, or for what I can count on. Paul Tripp has done a good job of reminding me who God is and who I am so that my heart rejoices each morning just because I am Great devotional to prepare your heart for Easter. What an excellent devotional to help prepare our hearts and minds for Easter. As a human, I am prone to forget the many blessings that Christ has given me. It is so easy to focus on what is wrong with the world, or what is not working in my life and I forget to be grateful for what is working, or for what I can count on. Paul Tripp has done a good job of reminding me who God is and who I am so that my heart rejoices each morning just because I am His!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Scarlett Merritt

    Really well done. Tripp shepherded his readers well, tapping directly into difficult and even uncomfortable areas and convicting sin patterns while beautifully and appropriately pointing in turn to Jesus’s redemptive work carried out on the cross on our behalf so that we may glorify God and enjoy Him forever. The beauty and truth of this work, especially the vivid description of Jesus’s perfectly humble humanity, truly brought me to tears. This is a work my family and I will return to in future Really well done. Tripp shepherded his readers well, tapping directly into difficult and even uncomfortable areas and convicting sin patterns while beautifully and appropriately pointing in turn to Jesus’s redemptive work carried out on the cross on our behalf so that we may glorify God and enjoy Him forever. The beauty and truth of this work, especially the vivid description of Jesus’s perfectly humble humanity, truly brought me to tears. This is a work my family and I will return to in future Lenten seasons.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Wes F

    Another classic book by Paul David Tripp, focused on the cross of Christ--its meaning, its benefits, its calling. Tripp is such an inspiring, introspective, challenging writer--I love his questions. He gets down to the root of whatever matter he writes about--holds no punches. He's real, vulnerable, visceral, probing, and pastoral. He always calls the reader back to the fundamentals of our relationship with Christ and how it ought to be worked out in real life, among real people. Another classic book by Paul David Tripp, focused on the cross of Christ--its meaning, its benefits, its calling. Tripp is such an inspiring, introspective, challenging writer--I love his questions. He gets down to the root of whatever matter he writes about--holds no punches. He's real, vulnerable, visceral, probing, and pastoral. He always calls the reader back to the fundamentals of our relationship with Christ and how it ought to be worked out in real life, among real people.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kristian Gao

    Very good book. Highly recommended, I chose this book for my church in this Lent season to help our members meditate on God’s word. This is really a beautiful, great devotional guide which leads us go through the spiritual journey to the cross of our Lord. In this book you will understand our Lord deeper and know yourself more clearly, and the love to our God in your heart will be kindled again!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Cowan

    I haven’t read much of Paul Tripp. This was easy to read. I planned to finish this book on Easter Sunday but started a few days earlier than I thought. I enjoyed this journey to the cross and I feel a number of the chapters where very challenging. I also enjoyed the mixture of comments and poetry. A Journey to the Cross that will be used again as I consider Lent.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ben Thowe

    I read this book as a devotional for Lent and thoroughly loved it. Paul Tripp has a gift for speaking about our hearts and our sin in powerful ways, while at the same time pointing us to the immeasurable grace of Jesus. Lent is a season of reflecting on our sin and need for a savior, and this book was perfect for providing daily meditations that help prepare us for Good Friday and Easter.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cindy L. Maus

    Excellent Devotional I learned so much through this Lenten devotional, and through reading, studying and meditating on God's Word! I am so grateful for this study and look forward to reading more from Paul David Tripp. May God bless him as he has blessed all who read what God has given him to write. Excellent Devotional I learned so much through this Lenten devotional, and through reading, studying and meditating on God's Word! I am so grateful for this study and look forward to reading more from Paul David Tripp. May God bless him as he has blessed all who read what God has given him to write.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kerr Howell

    This book was a great use to keep Focus on the main thing about Lent. This devotion hits you and makes you uncomfortable many times. The reason you are uncomfortable is because the book becomes a very personal Journey who is the cross. And so when you focus on the cross of Jesus what foot in there it really puts you in an position so where all you can say oh how has love me

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kellie Fisher

    In the intro, Tripp writes, “During our forty days together, may your mourning increase so that your joy may deepen. May you groan more so that you would pray more. May your sadness ignite your celebration.” And this devotional truly did help guide my mourning, groaning, and sadness in a way that led to deeper joy, prayer, and celebration.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Shane Budd

    This was one of the best written devotionals I’ve read. I finished 7 days early because I read on Sundays. I didn’t want to take a break, lol. Tripp’s writing really draws you to Jesus during the Lent season. A lot of reflection. Good stuff.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Holly Canup

    This is an excellent Lenten devotional! He brings to the surface new ways of thinking about sacrifice, righteousness, sanctification, and God’s Kingdom. I’ll be reading this one for years to come.

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