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A sweeping saga in the vein of Ask Again, Yes following a foster family through almost a decade of dazzling triumph and wrenching heartbreak—from the author of The Orphans at Race Point. Set in the late 1950s through 1960s in a small town in Massachusetts, All the Children Are Home follows the Moscatelli family—Dahlia and Louie, foster parents, and their long-term foster ch A sweeping saga in the vein of Ask Again, Yes following a foster family through almost a decade of dazzling triumph and wrenching heartbreak—from the author of The Orphans at Race Point. Set in the late 1950s through 1960s in a small town in Massachusetts, All the Children Are Home follows the Moscatelli family—Dahlia and Louie, foster parents, and their long-term foster children Jimmy, Zaidie, and Jon—and the irrevocable changes in their lives when a six-year-old indigenous girl, Agnes, is comes to live with them.. When Dahlia decided to become a foster mother, she had a few caveats: no howling newborns, no delinquents, and above all, no girls. A harrowing incident years before left her a virtual prisoner in her own home, forever wary of the heartbreak and limitation of a girl’s life. Eleven years after they began fostering, the Moscatellis are raising three children as their own and Dahlia and Louie consider their family complete, but when the social worker begs them to take a young girl who has been horrifically abused and neglected, they can’t say no. Six-year-old Agnes Juniper arrives with no knowledge of her Native American heritage or herself beyond a box of trinkets given to her by her mother and dreamlike memories of her sister. Before long, this stranger in their midst has strengthened the bond in this unusual family, showing them how to contend with outside forces that want to tear them apart. Heartfelt and enthralling, All the Children Are Home is a moving testament to how love can survive in the face of devastating losses.


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A sweeping saga in the vein of Ask Again, Yes following a foster family through almost a decade of dazzling triumph and wrenching heartbreak—from the author of The Orphans at Race Point. Set in the late 1950s through 1960s in a small town in Massachusetts, All the Children Are Home follows the Moscatelli family—Dahlia and Louie, foster parents, and their long-term foster ch A sweeping saga in the vein of Ask Again, Yes following a foster family through almost a decade of dazzling triumph and wrenching heartbreak—from the author of The Orphans at Race Point. Set in the late 1950s through 1960s in a small town in Massachusetts, All the Children Are Home follows the Moscatelli family—Dahlia and Louie, foster parents, and their long-term foster children Jimmy, Zaidie, and Jon—and the irrevocable changes in their lives when a six-year-old indigenous girl, Agnes, is comes to live with them.. When Dahlia decided to become a foster mother, she had a few caveats: no howling newborns, no delinquents, and above all, no girls. A harrowing incident years before left her a virtual prisoner in her own home, forever wary of the heartbreak and limitation of a girl’s life. Eleven years after they began fostering, the Moscatellis are raising three children as their own and Dahlia and Louie consider their family complete, but when the social worker begs them to take a young girl who has been horrifically abused and neglected, they can’t say no. Six-year-old Agnes Juniper arrives with no knowledge of her Native American heritage or herself beyond a box of trinkets given to her by her mother and dreamlike memories of her sister. Before long, this stranger in their midst has strengthened the bond in this unusual family, showing them how to contend with outside forces that want to tear them apart. Heartfelt and enthralling, All the Children Are Home is a moving testament to how love can survive in the face of devastating losses.

30 review for All the Children Are Home

  1. 4 out of 5

    Angela M

    This is one of the most affecting books I’ve read in a long while, striking every emotional chord. There are tragic circumstances in the lives of the characters that broke my heart . Unbearable things happened to them that made me angry and sad. I don’t remember how many times I cried. It was impossible not to feel that way for the foster children at the center of this story. Yet, it was impossible not to feel heartened, in spite of it all because everything became a little more bearable by the This is one of the most affecting books I’ve read in a long while, striking every emotional chord. There are tragic circumstances in the lives of the characters that broke my heart . Unbearable things happened to them that made me angry and sad. I don’t remember how many times I cried. It was impossible not to feel that way for the foster children at the center of this story. Yet, it was impossible not to feel heartened, in spite of it all because everything became a little more bearable by the genuine love in this family. The saddest thing is that while this is fiction, I suspect that this is a story that represents circumstances that could be real . The narrative alternates between three of the children and their foster mother Dahlia. They talk about themselves, their lives before coming to the Moscatellis and each other . I came to know each of them as their present and past stories collide in an intimate and introspective way growing up in this Massachusetts town in the 1950’s and 1960’s. I couldn’t decide who was my favorite character. At first I thought it might be six year old Agnes, a part Native American little girl, who comes to the family as an emergency case after a horrific experience at a foster home and with more sorrow than you can imagine in her young life. I thought it might be Jimmy, the oldest boy, abandoned by his alcoholic parents. He was the first to tell Agnes he loved her and we discover just how far he will go to protect her setting the stage for more heartache. I thought it might be Zaidie, who’s father abandons the family before her mother dies. She takes Agnes under her wing and is truly a big sister, making a sacrifice that will break your heart. I thought it might be Dahlia, who they call Ma, who herself is in so much pain and in need of healing after a horrific event in her life that has stolen her desire to leave her home for 29 years. I thought it might be Louie, the Dad, a hulk of a man, sometimes quiet and gruff, with a big heart, who goes to work day after day at the garage to fix cars. Truth of the matter is I loved them all. This is a love story of beautiful relationships which reflect what these kids meant to each other, how they cared for each other and how these ordinary people with burdens in their past have hearts full of love. It’s about how they manage to heal each other as best they can. It’s about unconditional love which provides hope, even in the most difficult of circumstances. It’s beautifully written and is one of the best books I’ve read this year. I received a copy of this book from HarperCollins through Edelweiss.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay - Traveling Sisters Book Reviews

    4+ stars! A slow-moving, quiet, but oh-so-powerful story. This book won’t be for everyone as it’s a very gradual build that quietly speaks to the reader. It takes time and patience but the pay off is well worth it. It is a character driven novel that will sneak up on you and capture your heart. The characters are phenomenal, remarkable, complicated and truly unforgettable! Never have I EVER read a book where I simply cannot choose a favourite character (or two). And this book included a large cast 4+ stars! A slow-moving, quiet, but oh-so-powerful story. This book won’t be for everyone as it’s a very gradual build that quietly speaks to the reader. It takes time and patience but the pay off is well worth it. It is a character driven novel that will sneak up on you and capture your heart. The characters are phenomenal, remarkable, complicated and truly unforgettable! Never have I EVER read a book where I simply cannot choose a favourite character (or two). And this book included a large cast of main characters - Ma, Pa, Nonna, Jimmy, Agnes, Zaida, Jon just to name a few. I honestly loved them ALL equally, but for very different reasons. There were so many layers to these deeply developed characters, their bonds with one another and the story itself that they haven’t left my mind since finishing the book a couple days ago. This story is centred around a foster family working hard to make ends meet. This book taught me many things. I felt for these characters and their personal situations - each and every one of them affected differently by the vulnerable foster children that come and leave the home. My heart broke repeatedly but was also filled with hope and affection for the love and loyalty that grew within the walls of this foster home. The writing is excellent. Powerful in its subtle and quiet manner. The words within these pages are heartwarming and heartbreaking. This book requires the reader to take their time to slowly savour the writing, the powerful story and the beautiful relationships. Thank you to Harper Collins and Edelweiss for the review copy!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    "That's not how it works, Ma," she said. "People don't just beat you once. They come back to do it over and over." Patry Francis gives her readers a glimpse into the jagged realities of unconventional family life in the late 1950's and 1960's. Life begins on uneven ground in a small town in Massachusetts for the Moscatelli family. It's what they've known. It's who they are. Dahlia and Louie set up their home to receive foster children. Although they've stood steadfast with certain lines drawn in t "That's not how it works, Ma," she said. "People don't just beat you once. They come back to do it over and over." Patry Francis gives her readers a glimpse into the jagged realities of unconventional family life in the late 1950's and 1960's. Life begins on uneven ground in a small town in Massachusetts for the Moscatelli family. It's what they've known. It's who they are. Dahlia and Louie set up their home to receive foster children. Although they've stood steadfast with certain lines drawn in the sand, the couple have taken in children from all backgrounds. Some short-term. Some even longer. The system doesn't often bend favorably in one's direction. Presently, the couple have Jimmy who is in middle school. Zaida and her younger brother, Jon, have been with them since their mother died of cancer. The family unit takes on the challenges of the days surviving under criticism from the community who consider this brood to be "less" than the rest of them. But the winds of change will soon be rattling the foundation unannounced. On the doorstep is a social worker hand-in-hand with six year old Agnes Juniper. Agnes....with the beautiful blue black hair and of Native American heritage.....eyes cast downward. Agnes....who fearfully watches out the front window after the social worker leaves looking for signs of a yellow car with foreboding. Agnes....who will profoundly change the dynamics of this family. All the Children Are Home pulls back a bit of the curtain with light falling upon the forgotten children shuffled from home to home with meager belongings stuffed into a paper sack. Just how many times can the human spirit withstand rejection before the fissures set into the soul? Patry Francis takes on subject matter not often brought to light in fiction and perhaps even non-fiction. The telling rests heavy on the heart where breathing comes in ragged spurts. She holds nothing back. And in this mixture of a coldly ladled stew are also moments of unexpected triumphs. There's something at the core of this disjointed group that will connect the brokenness. And within these walls we'll find Dahlia who suffered an unspoken trauma over twenty years ago that has left her housebound. She concentrates on her 1,000 piece puzzles from her familiar chair while watching for signs of need from these children. Harsh of voice, but gentle of heart. And all the while Louie gets up each morning and heads to his car repair shop to feed this growing group. A hulk of a man who keeps his finger on the pulse of what's happening. All the Children Are Home may not be for everyone. But I would say this: Don't avoid an opportunity to sit with these uncomfortable realities that touch other people's lives so directly. How do we build compassion if we don't open ourselves up and view what rests inside another's soul? This novel showcases the resilience of the human spirit as well in recognizing instantly the pain in another's journey. It's all in the binding together of my unease with yours to surely make a difference.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader

    I am a character fan all the way, and All the Children Are Home is a beautifully-told glimpse into these characters lives, I could just hug it. And I did. Set in the 1950s and 60s in Massachusetts, All the Children Are Home is a story of a foster family narrated by both the children and adults at different times. My heart ached with the pain some of the characters experienced, but not long after, my heart would burst with the love I could feel in their genuine hearts and how they interacted with I am a character fan all the way, and All the Children Are Home is a beautifully-told glimpse into these characters lives, I could just hug it. And I did. Set in the 1950s and 60s in Massachusetts, All the Children Are Home is a story of a foster family narrated by both the children and adults at different times. My heart ached with the pain some of the characters experienced, but not long after, my heart would burst with the love I could feel in their genuine hearts and how they interacted with each other. Just a few pages into reading this, you know it’s a special, endearing story. The Moscatellis taught me time and again what family is, and I will never forget the experience of reading their story. Apparently I bought another well-loved book by Patry Francis, The Orphans of Race Point, six years ago, and I cannot wait to pick it up! This one publishes tomorrow! I received a gifted copy. Many of my reviews can also be found on my blog: www.jennifertarheelreader.com and instagram: www.instagram.com/tarheelreader

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jessica | JustReadingJess

    All the Children Are Home is a heartbreaking and heartwarming story about family. Dahlia and Louie are happy with their three foster children when they temporarily bring Agnes into their home. This story shows that family is more than blood. All of the characters are put in difficult situations, and it is interesting to see how they react and how it affects their lives. I felt so bad for all the characters at some point. I enjoyed seeing Agnes become part of the family. The viewpoints of the dif All the Children Are Home is a heartbreaking and heartwarming story about family. Dahlia and Louie are happy with their three foster children when they temporarily bring Agnes into their home. This story shows that family is more than blood. All of the characters are put in difficult situations, and it is interesting to see how they react and how it affects their lives. I felt so bad for all the characters at some point. I enjoyed seeing Agnes become part of the family. The viewpoints of the different family members allows the reader to understand what all of the characters went through. All the Children Are Home is a story of family, love and protecting others. I recommend All the Children Are Home to fans of character driven stories about family. I listened to the audiobook narrated by Kimberly Woods, Nora Hunter, Mia Barron and Patrick Zeller. They all did a great job and I really felt like the characters were telling their stories. I enjoyed having a large cast of narrators with a different narrator for each character. Thank you Harper Perennial for the ARC and Harper Audio for the ALC. Full Review: https://justreadingjess.wordpress.com...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Patry

    ALL THE CHILDREN ARE HOME is more personal and important to me than anything I've ever written. Though the Moscatellis are entirely fictional, the story of a small child, separated not only from her birth family but all knowledge of herself and her cultural identity is one that is particularly close to my heart. All too often we hear about the tragedies that occur when the foster care system fails. Those abuses impact my characters as well, but more than that, I wanted to shine a light on the ch ALL THE CHILDREN ARE HOME is more personal and important to me than anything I've ever written. Though the Moscatellis are entirely fictional, the story of a small child, separated not only from her birth family but all knowledge of herself and her cultural identity is one that is particularly close to my heart. All too often we hear about the tragedies that occur when the foster care system fails. Those abuses impact my characters as well, but more than that, I wanted to shine a light on the challenges and successes of "good" foster parents—those who welcome our most wounded children into their homes and raise them as their own—and on the resilience and plain courage such children need simply to survive. As part of my research, I interviewed a former supervisor from the Department of Children and Families. She told me about "Margaret," a retired foster mother who had taken in nineteen children over the years. In the early days of the AIDS epidemic when there was little knowledge and much fear surrounding the virus, the department was having trouble finding a home for a newborn who had tested positive. Margaret was older by then, but as soon as she heard about the abandoned baby, she went to the hospital and took her home where she cared for her for the rest of the girl's life. In Dahlia Moscatelli, I wanted to create a hero like that—ordinary and all too human—but one for whom love, particularly the love for children, always outweighs fear.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn in FL

    GLORIOUS, HEART WRENCHING, VICTORIOUS FIGHTERS 5 BEAUTIFUL ***** "All the Children Are Home" deeply moved me as I read these people, who were shaken by a life's serious struggles but stood strong together despite the criticism of their community. Patry Francis has written a powerful novel that will linger in my mind long after I close the back cover. There were no extraordinary circumstances, no elements of the fantastical or superheroes, we often see in novels published today. We see individuals, GLORIOUS, HEART WRENCHING, VICTORIOUS FIGHTERS 5 BEAUTIFUL ***** "All the Children Are Home" deeply moved me as I read these people, who were shaken by a life's serious struggles but stood strong together despite the criticism of their community. Patry Francis has written a powerful novel that will linger in my mind long after I close the back cover. There were no extraordinary circumstances, no elements of the fantastical or superheroes, we often see in novels published today. We see individuals, bonded by love come hold one another up as they face their own unique challenges and it worked beautifully though not always the way the outside world would accept or applaud but reveals the inner strength of the individual, who chose not to throw in the towel. Dahlia and Louis Moscatelli begin the family by fostering Jimmy, a young man, who lost both parents to addiction, one is the town drunk and is often arrested for minor little crimes and Jimmy's source of ongoing shame. Next came Zaidie and Jon, who watched as their mom passed after their father abandoned her when she was pregnant with Jon. The story begins shortly before Agnes joins them, she is Native American and the source of derision in the 1950's due to her color. Her last foster home was horrific and she suffered broken bones. The primary narrators are Dahlia, who little by little shares her past trauma and very subtly points why they came to be foster parents. Zaidie and Agnes often contribute their own thoughts about this new family to which they belong and on occasion, we hear from Jimmy and his thoughts as well. In many respects, each person is rather ordinary, that was a powerful addition to this story in many ways. It was a result of the ordinariness of the parents that lent the children with consistency and resilience. Though they each have their minor and eventually major contact with the community and even the law, they know they will be supported and that their relationships will remain solid and strong, this family is a unit and though outside affection is a rarity and the "l" word is almost never said, each knows that their family is there for them no matter what! This is the story's brilliance. Ms. Francis doesn't require the character's to say all that they are thinking to allow us to know who they are, she is an artist that reveals them through their behaviors. So much so, that I was moved to tears, something that on rare occasions happens, the last time was a year and some months when I read, "This Tender Land". In the movie adaptation of Eric Segal's "Love Story", Jennifer Cavalleri say to her love Oliver Barrett "Love means never having to say you're sorry". Ms. Francis once again demonstrates that real love is being there for someone to encourage and stand with them during their darkest moments. I'd award more than 5 stars because of the solid conclusion of the story. I am grateful t0 Goodreads for the opportunity to request an ARC, I appreciate Harper Perennial for making the book available. I also thank the author, Patry Francis for writing a touching story that moved me. In return, I promised to write an honest review of my experience with this story. If this sounds like something you would enjoy, I urge you to order ASAP! Pre-Order if you can, it is sure to be a 2021 bestseller! Planned release is scheduled - April 13th 2021 by Harper Perennial. Triggers: Child abuse; sexual assault (modestly descriptive); bullying

  8. 5 out of 5

    Carmel Hanes

    Sometimes I wonder if birth canals are lined with invisible decks of cards or roulette wheels, secretly imprinting a life hand or number (lucky or not) onto the child sliding out; some kind of "fate" from the moment they pass into their own lives. Will they be loved? Will they have good fortune? Will they receive the nourishment they need to become all they can be? Or will they flounder in unmet needs, misfortune, pain and neglect? Will they find a rock to climb onto before they drown, or be off Sometimes I wonder if birth canals are lined with invisible decks of cards or roulette wheels, secretly imprinting a life hand or number (lucky or not) onto the child sliding out; some kind of "fate" from the moment they pass into their own lives. Will they be loved? Will they have good fortune? Will they receive the nourishment they need to become all they can be? Or will they flounder in unmet needs, misfortune, pain and neglect? Will they find a rock to climb onto before they drown, or be offered a lifeline where least expected? The children in this novel are some of those born into difficult circumstances and end up in foster care. Each with a backstory, each with a burden, each with a personality and way of surviving in an unpredictable world. Transplanted from their families, they re-root in a home where the soil may not be perfect, but provides enough essential nutrients to grow, to put on leaves, maybe to flower. A place where the nurtured become the nurturers, where giving leads to giving back. Where trust and love can create miracles, a day at a time, a step at a time. I've known foster kids. Those who arrive in a new placement with their meager belongings in paper or plastic bags. Those who often pay the price for adult challenges and failures. The kids in this story are realistic and well-portrayed. I've known foster parents. Those who open their homes and hearts to temporary orphans. They come in all sizes and shapes, but the ones who do it for love are unappreciated heroes. And just like with biological parents, meeting foster parents can be awakening from a bad dream or the continuation of a nightmare. This book offers a complete view of this complex world. A story that is captivating and maintains tension throughout as the characters try to find solid ground on shifting sands.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mary Lins

    “All the Children Are Home”, by Patry Francis, is immediately engaging! It’s the story of the Moscatelli family. Dahlia and Louie are foster parents to Jimmy, Zaidie, and Jon. Into the mix arrives “temporary” and “emergency”, Agnes, a six year old indigenous child, who immediately captivates us all. The story is set in the 1950s and 60s and you will absolutely CRINGE with some of the language used, and some of the ways that the children are treated. But it is very true to the era! Remember, this “All the Children Are Home”, by Patry Francis, is immediately engaging! It’s the story of the Moscatelli family. Dahlia and Louie are foster parents to Jimmy, Zaidie, and Jon. Into the mix arrives “temporary” and “emergency”, Agnes, a six year old indigenous child, who immediately captivates us all. The story is set in the 1950s and 60s and you will absolutely CRINGE with some of the language used, and some of the ways that the children are treated. But it is very true to the era! Remember, this is the era when kids played “Cowboys and Indians”! Structured in sections with the alternating points of view of foster mother, Dahlia, oldest daughter Zaidie, and Agnes. The characters are beautifully drawn, the narrative is intriguing, and the plot is propulsive, thus I found it very difficult to put this novel down. There were so many questions/mysteries that I wanted to understand. What happened to Dahlia that caused her to become agoraphobic? Why did she decide to become a foster mother? What will happen to these children? The novel shows that “family” is so much more than shared genetics; I fell in love with the Moscatellis, and I recommend this wonderful novel to every reader who loves stories about families full of both heartbreak and joy. It’s been compared to “Ask Again, Yes” by Mary Beth Keane, but I must also compare it to Mary Lawson’s wonderful family novels. I hated to part with the Moscatellis!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Unable to conceive biological children, Dahlia and Louie become foster parents instead. With foster children Jimmy, Zaidie, and Jon living with them indefinitely, they feel like their family is complete but yet when 6 year old Native American girl Agnes arrives, they just can't say no. "Sometimes there is no line, Dahlia. Isn’t that what you’ve been telling me all these years?" Ever since reading and loving The Orphans of Race Point in 2014, I have been waiting for another book by this author. Al Unable to conceive biological children, Dahlia and Louie become foster parents instead. With foster children Jimmy, Zaidie, and Jon living with them indefinitely, they feel like their family is complete but yet when 6 year old Native American girl Agnes arrives, they just can't say no. "Sometimes there is no line, Dahlia. Isn’t that what you’ve been telling me all these years?" Ever since reading and loving The Orphans of Race Point in 2014, I have been waiting for another book by this author. All the Children Are Home was one of my most anticipated reads of 2021, and it exceeded my expectations. Just like Race Point, Home also focused on how blood isn't always thicker than water. Set in the 1950s and 60s, this story about love, courage, and resilience was so beautiful, so real, so raw, and so tender that it brought tears to my eyes more times than any other book ever. It evoked so many emotions for so many different reasons, yet also provided powerful rays of hope, filling my heart with joy, love and light. "Hope is the thing with feathers." This story didn't just tug on my heartstrings; its poignancy yanked them so tightly it hurt. When life gets rough, we all think, "I don’t have it in me." But then another day dawns, and we do. "A new day that demanded we get up and live it." If you'd like to read another excellent book about foster kids, then I'd highly recommend The Language of Flowers (5 stars) by Vanessa Diffenbaugh! Location: Massachusetts I received an advance copy of this book. All opinions are my own. I also loved these quotes: "That was coach for you. Even when she claimed to give up on me, she was still trying to find a sneaky way to make me better. Just like Ma." Page 181 "Cause when you see a scrap of pretty in this world, you gotta stop and give it a little respect... do you know why?... Cause there’s a whole lot of ugly out there." Page 185 "You don’t do anything by yourself in this world, and if it’s worth anything, it’s not just for yourself, either. You’re either lifting up the people around you, or you’re pulling them down, whether you know it or not." Page 199 "Every blade of grass has an angel that stands over it, whispering, Grow, Grow. That was Ma. That was the work of her life." Page 199 "What could I say to the girls who had come to me like Jimmy, in the fabulous migration of souls, and given me back a world that was dead to me?" Page 366

  11. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie Brody

    Dahlia Moscatelli's life is bound to her foster children. Initially, she told social services that she only wanted boys but they managed to talk her into taking a few girls. Dahlia knows the horrors that girls face and she doesn't want to be an observer to this. She herself suffered some horrible trauma as a young woman that keeps her housebound with her foster children. Her husband Louis has a stern exterior but a heart of gold. One day, social services comes to Dahlia begging her to take in a y Dahlia Moscatelli's life is bound to her foster children. Initially, she told social services that she only wanted boys but they managed to talk her into taking a few girls. Dahlia knows the horrors that girls face and she doesn't want to be an observer to this. She herself suffered some horrible trauma as a young woman that keeps her housebound with her foster children. Her husband Louis has a stern exterior but a heart of gold. One day, social services comes to Dahlia begging her to take in a young Native American girl named Agnes. Agnes has suffered long and terrible abuse and is barely able to speak. One of the older foster girls, Zaide, takes Agnes under her wing and helps teach her proper speaking and comforts her when she fearful. Agnes is frightened that Dean's car, the one her abuser drives, will come for her and she will not be able to escape. Every night she watches for it. Nightmares overrun her sleep and she often gets into Zaides's bed for protection. The other two children in Dahlia's care are Jimmy, a teenager who is struggling with first love and his hormones, and Joe, Zaide's little brother who is a toddler. Agnes has bad asthma and she is told never to run. She has no knowledge of her heritage except for a box she carries everywhere that contains mementos of her past life. At first I really enjoyed the narrative and story line but then it got a bit bland and distant to me. I couldn't connect well with the characters and I found too much of the novel repetitive and prescient. This is not to say I did not like the book, it is only to indicate that had it been edited more, and the character development been richer, it could have been a much better novel. 3.5 rounded up to 4.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Addie BookCrazyBlogger

    It’s 1959 and Agnes Juniper is six years old, Native American and has been horrifically abused, neglected throughout her short life. She’s sent to live with the Moscatelli’s: Dahlia, Louie and their three adopted children: Jimmy, Jon and Zadie. Dahlia is determined to never have teenagers, only have boys and never have any juvenile delinquents. She breaks all three of her rules in order to raise her three children, including Agnes when it becomes clear that Agnes is determined to become part of It’s 1959 and Agnes Juniper is six years old, Native American and has been horrifically abused, neglected throughout her short life. She’s sent to live with the Moscatelli’s: Dahlia, Louie and their three adopted children: Jimmy, Jon and Zadie. Dahlia is determined to never have teenagers, only have boys and never have any juvenile delinquents. She breaks all three of her rules in order to raise her three children, including Agnes when it becomes clear that Agnes is determined to become part of the family. The novel goes on to tell the story of this family as they grow up throughout the 60’s, not holding back from pain, fear, good times and bad times, including the story behind why Dahlia is a virtual hermit, refusing to leave her house. If you’re looking for a family saga, then you have to pick this book up. This book brought tears to my eyes, brought laughter to my heart and transported me back into the 60’s with a ramshackle family that runs on a little bit of money, a lot of strength and more love than anything else.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Marina Kahn

    This book was chosen by my Book Club for the month of May read. At first I thought, what kind of title is this. Then I thought well it's an probably appropriate read for May, Mother's Day month. I realized this was about foster care. Only thing I new about that was that good neighbors who lived in my block the Rodriguez' family took in foster children and there seemed to be a migration of children of various ages staying at their home. They always seemed to care for and love the children; however This book was chosen by my Book Club for the month of May read. At first I thought, what kind of title is this. Then I thought well it's an probably appropriate read for May, Mother's Day month. I realized this was about foster care. Only thing I new about that was that good neighbors who lived in my block the Rodriguez' family took in foster children and there seemed to be a migration of children of various ages staying at their home. They always seemed to care for and love the children; however, they seemed to come and go. This book certainly enlightened me about this process. I'll say the parents who do this and take loving care of the children entrusted to them are true heroes. The book is beautifully written. I couldn't put it down. I cried, I laughed, I saw myself as a teen-ager struggling to be accepted by my peers. The story is driven by the various characters and you get to hear their stories from their own point of view. I loved each and every one of these characters. I ached for them when they hurt and I cheered for their victories. It's one of the best books I've read so far this year.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Noella Allisen

    I loved this book and echo Angela M's review. She said what I would if I could. I loved this book and echo Angela M's review. She said what I would if I could.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tina

    I loved this book so much so it's strange that I'm having a hard time putting my feelings into words. I feel like this book has the power to restore your faith in humanity; there are still good people in the world! This will be a top favorite of 2021 and an all-time favorite! I received an advanced copy as part of the #oliveinfluencer program from Harper Perennial; all thoughts and opinions are my own. I loved this book so much so it's strange that I'm having a hard time putting my feelings into words. I feel like this book has the power to restore your faith in humanity; there are still good people in the world! This will be a top favorite of 2021 and an all-time favorite! I received an advanced copy as part of the #oliveinfluencer program from Harper Perennial; all thoughts and opinions are my own.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Yelena

    Ahhhh, where do I begin? I guess I won't begin by re-telling the book even though it seems to be a very popular way to write reviews on here. I am assuming that you either already read the book, in which case, why would I re-tell it to you? Or want to read it, and again, why would I re-tell it to you?? I looked long and hard for what were people seeing in this book to keep giving it 5 stars. I mean, yes, it's a touching story. And yes, it's a great topic. But 5 stars?? The characters where just n Ahhhh, where do I begin? I guess I won't begin by re-telling the book even though it seems to be a very popular way to write reviews on here. I am assuming that you either already read the book, in which case, why would I re-tell it to you? Or want to read it, and again, why would I re-tell it to you?? I looked long and hard for what were people seeing in this book to keep giving it 5 stars. I mean, yes, it's a touching story. And yes, it's a great topic. But 5 stars?? The characters where just not developed at all. And I get it, it's hard when you have at least 5 main characters to bring them all to life. But wow, the first 75 % of the book was just.....a mess. I had to keep going back to the beginning of each chapter, trying to remember who we were reading about. None of the kids really had any personalities at all. Foster mother? Oh my, she was there....but wasn't really there.... The story line itself was a mess too. I don't know if the author was going for "hardships of the foster care" or "greatness of those particular foster parents", but she didn't succeed in any of it. So, to sum it up - if you want to tell a story from 5 different perspectives - you better have a talent to develop those perspectives and decide what exactly is the point of your story. And if the plot spans a decade, you better have some kind of transitions. I keep trying to have faith in contemporary fiction, but finding very few good ones.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Rose

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 4.5 stars. Equal parts realistically brutal and passionately optimistic, this book delves into the life of a foster family during the late 1950-1960s, each member with their own baggage and obstacles. The story of Dahlia, Louie and their foster children Jimmy, Zaida, Jon and Agnes explores their strength, perseverance and love for one another as they each face their pasts and the darker parts of themselves over a period of ten years. It's hard to describe how much Patry Francis made me care abou 4.5 stars. Equal parts realistically brutal and passionately optimistic, this book delves into the life of a foster family during the late 1950-1960s, each member with their own baggage and obstacles. The story of Dahlia, Louie and their foster children Jimmy, Zaida, Jon and Agnes explores their strength, perseverance and love for one another as they each face their pasts and the darker parts of themselves over a period of ten years. It's hard to describe how much Patry Francis made me care about these characters. I felt like I got to see the kids grow up, feel hopeful when their lives made happy turns and equally crushed when things went wrong--especially with Jimmy and Dahlia. As intense as their stories were, this book was about ultimately about overcoming the weight of the past, pushing forward and finding new dreams, and fighting for the family you choose. Not a light read, but very beautiful. Thanks to Netgalley for the advanced copy! Spoiler Trigger Warnings: Child abuse, discussion of attempted suicide, a survivor of a violent rape recalls her experience (it's not graphic in description, but in context its pretty brutal)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sterling Shanks

    I was instantly drawn to this story because of my experience being a foster parent. There is a lot going on in this story. There is beautiful story telling done here. As someone who has been involved in foster care for a while, it is a very unrepresented story line that I wish more people knew about. “All the Children are Home” does do some things really well. It shows the complications of being in foster care. At its core being in foster care means your family is broken. These kids in residenti I was instantly drawn to this story because of my experience being a foster parent. There is a lot going on in this story. There is beautiful story telling done here. As someone who has been involved in foster care for a while, it is a very unrepresented story line that I wish more people knew about. “All the Children are Home” does do some things really well. It shows the complications of being in foster care. At its core being in foster care means your family is broken. These kids in residential care just need above all love. This shows that in the weaving of it’s story. I particularly loved the story line of Agnes. The author did such a good job of showing what it’s like to be a different race than your foster family. I enjoyed as a reader being able to watch her grow and thrive under the care of Ma. Thank you so much Net Galley for this advanced copy, I enjoyed reading it!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Irene

    I was enchanted by Agnes, the abused child who is placed with the family, but most intrigued with Dahlia, the home bound foster mom who has suffered agoraphobia for years. From the beginning you can tell something horrible happened to her in the past. Most women will guess the gist of it but when she finally reveals the details it is both heartbreaking and enraging, Dahlia and her husband Louie have taken in many foster children over the years. Dahlia has tried not to let herself get too attache I was enchanted by Agnes, the abused child who is placed with the family, but most intrigued with Dahlia, the home bound foster mom who has suffered agoraphobia for years. From the beginning you can tell something horrible happened to her in the past. Most women will guess the gist of it but when she finally reveals the details it is both heartbreaking and enraging, Dahlia and her husband Louie have taken in many foster children over the years. Dahlia has tried not to let herself get too attached to them so as not to have a broken heart when it's time for them to leave. She and her husband sometimes appear cold even towards each other but their love for each other and the children is fierce. This was an intense story of neglect and abuse, love and loss and proof that families don't have to share DNA to be real., Though set in the 1950s it somehow felt timeless, in that the foster care system of those days is as broken today. There were a couple of little things that bothered me about what seemed like inaccuracies for the time period for example I am pretty sure the term Bipolar was never used before the 80s, back in the 60s it would have been called manic depression, but the depth of the characters and the way they engaged with each other felt genuine to me. I received an advance copy for review.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Justinepow

    ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ This is not a book you rush through- this is a book that you read slowly taking in the characters, the story, and the insight. This is not a chick lit, light and fluffy book. This is a book that holds many truths in the world of foster care, abuse, assault, neglect and abandonment. It also told a story of love, a deep love. I wish I was better with words in this moment because this book deserves a review that will give you a true depiction. It really showcases the strength and resilien ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ This is not a book you rush through- this is a book that you read slowly taking in the characters, the story, and the insight. This is not a chick lit, light and fluffy book. This is a book that holds many truths in the world of foster care, abuse, assault, neglect and abandonment. It also told a story of love, a deep love. I wish I was better with words in this moment because this book deserves a review that will give you a true depiction. It really showcases the strength and resilience of people who have survived so much! It also shares the story of diverse families and how we can love and be connected so deeply to people we might not be born into but people who are there for us no matter what.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Patsey

    I was rooting for all these characters! I enjoyed this book. What makes a family? p. 197 “You don’t do anything by yourself in this world, and if it’s worth anything, it’s not just for yourself, either. You’re either lifting up the people around you, or you’re pulling them down, whether you know it or not.”

  22. 4 out of 5

    Hillary Brubaker

    This book is so real, so raw, so colorful, so memorable. I did not want it to end and I miss each of the characters already!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Donna Everhart

    Originally published at New York Journal of Books: https://www.nyjournalofbooks.com/book... Originally published at New York Journal of Books: https://www.nyjournalofbooks.com/book...

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sharla

    Not at all what I expected from the synopsis, yet these characters were charming and real and will stick with me for a while.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    Beautiful characters that love each other so dearly it sometimes goes unnoticed. The longest love letter I've ever read, magnificent. Beautiful characters that love each other so dearly it sometimes goes unnoticed. The longest love letter I've ever read, magnificent.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Maggie McKenna

    What a powerful story!❤

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jo-jean Keller

    If someone asked me for one word to describe my feelings as a read this book, it would be hope with every word. What an inspiring story.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lena

    "What could I do but put on my shoes, start down the street, and see where the day might lead?" What a lovely book with wonderfully complex characters that you are rooting for the whole way. "What could I do but put on my shoes, start down the street, and see where the day might lead?" What a lovely book with wonderfully complex characters that you are rooting for the whole way.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Molly

    This book is set in the 1950s and 1960s and follows the Moscatelli family who live in a small town in Massachusetts. Dahlia and Louie are foster parents to Jimmy, Zaidie, and Jon. One day Agnes shows up to live with them, but Dahlia really does not want to take in another little girl. Agnes comes and is deeply connected to each family member and shows the strength and bond possible in families. Over the years, we follow the family as they experience many heart-wrenching situations that force the This book is set in the 1950s and 1960s and follows the Moscatelli family who live in a small town in Massachusetts. Dahlia and Louie are foster parents to Jimmy, Zaidie, and Jon. One day Agnes shows up to live with them, but Dahlia really does not want to take in another little girl. Agnes comes and is deeply connected to each family member and shows the strength and bond possible in families. Over the years, we follow the family as they experience many heart-wrenching situations that force them to fall back on family for support. I really loved the characters in this book. Each was very dynamic and we learned a lot about their background and why they are the way they are. I really loved the inside look into a foster family and found myself rooting for each character throughout. Jimmy was a very devoted older brother that struggled with his fathers past, but would do anything for his foster parents and siblings. Zaidie was extremely sweet and caring and went through so much trying to care for her brother Jon. She took Agnes under her wing and the two were inseparable. Agnes was deeply troubled and experienced so much as a young kid. She had bounced around with so many different families and truly bonded the Moscatelli family. Both Dahlia and Louie were very complex characters that we learned about throughout the book. I do wish there was more description of the town in which they lived. I was a little confused in the beginning with who each person was and what their background was and it seemed to take some time to learn about each persons past, but it may have made things more clear early on. Overall, I felt very invested in the lives of the characters and I would love to read a sequel to follow the characters on their future endeavors. Thank you to NetGalley and HarperCollins for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Erica

    I enjoyed “All the Children Are Home”, by Patry Francis. I am picky with fiction and this book had me engaged from the very start and I found it hard to put down. The characters in the story really touched me and I loved experiencing their growth throughout the book. I do wish Louie's point of view was included in addition to the other characters. The Moscatellis showed how it's not blood that makes a family - each member of the household is so supportive and caring towards the others. These cha I enjoyed “All the Children Are Home”, by Patry Francis. I am picky with fiction and this book had me engaged from the very start and I found it hard to put down. The characters in the story really touched me and I loved experiencing their growth throughout the book. I do wish Louie's point of view was included in addition to the other characters. The Moscatellis showed how it's not blood that makes a family - each member of the household is so supportive and caring towards the others. These characters were all broken and vulnerable in their own ways and thrived due to the unconditional love and support they received from each other. There are so many special moments in the story of what they do for each other - these characters and how they cared for each other will stick with me. I feel that the characters are really the strength of this story. I didn't always care for the storyline, but felt like that was really just a background and following these people as they became more aware of their struggles and tried to overcome them while strengthening their relationships with each other was the main purpose of the book. Thank you very much for this ARC! I'm so glad I read this book and definitely recommend it.

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