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Lost Wonderland: The Brief and Brilliant Life of Boston's Million Dollar Amusement Park

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If you take Boston's Blue Line to its northern end, you'll reach the Wonderland stop. Few realize that a twenty-three-acre amusement park once sat nearby—the largest in New England, and grander than any of the Coney Island parks that inspired it. Opened in Revere on Memorial Day in 1906 to great fanfare, Wonderland offered hundreds of thousands of visitors recreation by th If you take Boston's Blue Line to its northern end, you'll reach the Wonderland stop. Few realize that a twenty-three-acre amusement park once sat nearby—the largest in New England, and grander than any of the Coney Island parks that inspired it. Opened in Revere on Memorial Day in 1906 to great fanfare, Wonderland offered hundreds of thousands of visitors recreation by the sea, just a short distance from downtown Boston. The story of the park's creation and wild, but brief, success is full of larger-than-life characters who hoped to thrill attendees and rake in profits. Stephen R. Wilk describes the planning and history of the park, which featured early roller coasters, a scenic railway, a central lagoon in which a Shoot-the-Chutes boat plunged, an aerial swing, a funhouse, and more. Performances ran throughout the day, including a daring Fires and Flames show; a Wild West show; a children's theater; and numerous circus acts. While nothing remains of what was once called "Boston's Regal Home of Pleasure" and the park would close in 1910, this book resurrects Wonderland by transporting readers through its magical gates.


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If you take Boston's Blue Line to its northern end, you'll reach the Wonderland stop. Few realize that a twenty-three-acre amusement park once sat nearby—the largest in New England, and grander than any of the Coney Island parks that inspired it. Opened in Revere on Memorial Day in 1906 to great fanfare, Wonderland offered hundreds of thousands of visitors recreation by th If you take Boston's Blue Line to its northern end, you'll reach the Wonderland stop. Few realize that a twenty-three-acre amusement park once sat nearby—the largest in New England, and grander than any of the Coney Island parks that inspired it. Opened in Revere on Memorial Day in 1906 to great fanfare, Wonderland offered hundreds of thousands of visitors recreation by the sea, just a short distance from downtown Boston. The story of the park's creation and wild, but brief, success is full of larger-than-life characters who hoped to thrill attendees and rake in profits. Stephen R. Wilk describes the planning and history of the park, which featured early roller coasters, a scenic railway, a central lagoon in which a Shoot-the-Chutes boat plunged, an aerial swing, a funhouse, and more. Performances ran throughout the day, including a daring Fires and Flames show; a Wild West show; a children's theater; and numerous circus acts. While nothing remains of what was once called "Boston's Regal Home of Pleasure" and the park would close in 1910, this book resurrects Wonderland by transporting readers through its magical gates.

35 review for Lost Wonderland: The Brief and Brilliant Life of Boston's Million Dollar Amusement Park

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Sullivan

    Interesting read on the lost Wonderland Amusement Park of Revere Beach in the early 1900s that gives a comprehensive perspective of the boom of seaside amusement boardwalk culture and all the fun rides that would not be allowed in today's world of extreme safety. Some intriguing anecdotes about how rides came to be and how thriving Revere used to be as a result of the park but then declined in its eventual demise. Great read for a nerd that loves this kind of forgotten history and memorabilia. Interesting read on the lost Wonderland Amusement Park of Revere Beach in the early 1900s that gives a comprehensive perspective of the boom of seaside amusement boardwalk culture and all the fun rides that would not be allowed in today's world of extreme safety. Some intriguing anecdotes about how rides came to be and how thriving Revere used to be as a result of the park but then declined in its eventual demise. Great read for a nerd that loves this kind of forgotten history and memorabilia.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tea

    3.5 stars.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Skerry

  4. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Bartz

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jackie Bufalino

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Rubenstein

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    Michelle

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    Brittany

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    Laur

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    Daniela Serrano

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    Kris

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    emmy

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    Carrie

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sean

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    Kate

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    Michael Blanding

  19. 5 out of 5

    Katie Ouellette

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    Robin

  21. 5 out of 5

    Megan Johnson

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

  24. 4 out of 5

    M.J.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Chloe

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    Stacy

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lydia Pazienza

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jacqueline Kawate

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dani

  31. 4 out of 5

    Sienna

  32. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Watson

  33. 4 out of 5

    Rachelr

  34. 4 out of 5

    Jill

  35. 5 out of 5

    Teresa Chen

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