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Can't Stop Thinking: How to Let Go of Anxiety and Free Yourself from Obsessive Rumination

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“Read this book and experience the freedom to create your reality.” —Deepak Chopra, MD, author of Total Meditation Don’t believe everything your mind tells you. Are you a chronic overthinker? Do you obsess to the point of feeling anxious, hopeless, angry, or stressed out? Have you ever tried to “think your way out” of one of these negative thought spirals, only to fall in “Read this book and experience the freedom to create your reality.” —Deepak Chopra, MD, author of Total Meditation Don’t believe everything your mind tells you. Are you a chronic overthinker? Do you obsess to the point of feeling anxious, hopeless, angry, or stressed out? Have you ever tried to “think your way out” of one of these negative thought spirals, only to fall in deeper? Let’s face it: trying to escape your thoughts—or control them—just doesn’t work, and can actually make you more miserable in the long run. So, how can you overcome your addiction to thinking?   In Can’t Stop Thinking, psychotherapist and spiritual counselor Nancy Colier offers the keys to breaking free from the obsessive rumination that drives stress, worry, and anxiety. Using powerful tools grounded in the ancient wisdom of mindfulness and evidence-based acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), you’ll learn how to observe and gain distance from troubling thoughts, put an end to harsh self-criticism, and manage difficult feelings like resentment and shame. If you’re ready to discover a life beyond your thoughts—one of self-compassion, presence, and peace—it’s time to stop thinking and start living.  


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“Read this book and experience the freedom to create your reality.” —Deepak Chopra, MD, author of Total Meditation Don’t believe everything your mind tells you. Are you a chronic overthinker? Do you obsess to the point of feeling anxious, hopeless, angry, or stressed out? Have you ever tried to “think your way out” of one of these negative thought spirals, only to fall in “Read this book and experience the freedom to create your reality.” —Deepak Chopra, MD, author of Total Meditation Don’t believe everything your mind tells you. Are you a chronic overthinker? Do you obsess to the point of feeling anxious, hopeless, angry, or stressed out? Have you ever tried to “think your way out” of one of these negative thought spirals, only to fall in deeper? Let’s face it: trying to escape your thoughts—or control them—just doesn’t work, and can actually make you more miserable in the long run. So, how can you overcome your addiction to thinking?   In Can’t Stop Thinking, psychotherapist and spiritual counselor Nancy Colier offers the keys to breaking free from the obsessive rumination that drives stress, worry, and anxiety. Using powerful tools grounded in the ancient wisdom of mindfulness and evidence-based acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), you’ll learn how to observe and gain distance from troubling thoughts, put an end to harsh self-criticism, and manage difficult feelings like resentment and shame. If you’re ready to discover a life beyond your thoughts—one of self-compassion, presence, and peace—it’s time to stop thinking and start living.  

30 review for Can't Stop Thinking: How to Let Go of Anxiety and Free Yourself from Obsessive Rumination

  1. 4 out of 5

    Didu

    I think all of us humans had enough when it comes to anger, resentment, guilt felt because we spoke too soon, without thinking and overall negative vibrations. This book I’m reading is here to help me, us but especially you to stop being a pain in the ass for yourself and the ones you care about and love. You have to care for yourself and start doing things for yourself and this is why this journey of change can only be made alone. Just you walking this road and it depends only on you, enough wi I think all of us humans had enough when it comes to anger, resentment, guilt felt because we spoke too soon, without thinking and overall negative vibrations. This book I’m reading is here to help me, us but especially you to stop being a pain in the ass for yourself and the ones you care about and love. You have to care for yourself and start doing things for yourself and this is why this journey of change can only be made alone. Just you walking this road and it depends only on you, enough with the dumb excuses, aren’t you ashamed of saying lies after lies and keep throwing that victim card over and over again? You are in charge of your own life, thoughts and feelings and only you can make yourself great or a victim with no reason to be one. In Can’t Stop Thinking, psychotherapist and spiritual counselor Nancy Colier offers the keys to breaking free from the obsessive rumination that drives stress, worry, and anxiety. Using powerful tools grounded in the ancient wisdom of mindfulness and evidence-based acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), you’ll learn how to observe and gain distance from troubling thoughts, put an end to harsh self-criticism, and manage difficult feelings like resentment and shame. I know this may sound repetitive especially on my blog but meditation does wonders, practice is the only med you need to help you conquer your mind, thoughts and feelings. It does wonders! It’s not easy to change but it isn’t impossible either and you have to do it dude, because otherwise you’ll end up horrified of your own actions and alone. Truth. This book can give you a heads up and also can help you find yourself and get rid of all this bs you’ve been making up for your own demise.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Leslie McKee

    As someone who overthinks, I was looking forward to reading this book. The author does a nice job of providing a quick overview of overthinking and how easy, and destructive, it is to get stuck in the cycle of obsessive thinking. She provides information on mindfulness and various tips to help the reader move beyond their unhealthy thinking. The author provides various tasks throughout the book to give the reader a chance to apply the concepts. There are lots of personal stories, which readers w As someone who overthinks, I was looking forward to reading this book. The author does a nice job of providing a quick overview of overthinking and how easy, and destructive, it is to get stuck in the cycle of obsessive thinking. She provides information on mindfulness and various tips to help the reader move beyond their unhealthy thinking. The author provides various tasks throughout the book to give the reader a chance to apply the concepts. There are lots of personal stories, which readers will likely find relatable. If you suffer from overthinking, this could be a helpful book to check out. While it won't provide a quick fix, it does give a lot of food for thought on reducing negative thinking. Disclaimer: I received a complimentary copy, but I wasn't required to leave a positive review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Erika

    3.5 stars

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kristine Mckenna

    I definitely do obsess over things that happen and also tend to rethink about resentments and mistakes often, so this book was really great for me. It gives practical advice on how to notice you are falling into a pattern of just following whatever your brain thinks at the moment. The author does a great job saying you are not your thoughts. It is possible to just accept obsessive, negative, or irrational thoughts and shut them down. This will take practice. The idea that thinking everything thr I definitely do obsess over things that happen and also tend to rethink about resentments and mistakes often, so this book was really great for me. It gives practical advice on how to notice you are falling into a pattern of just following whatever your brain thinks at the moment. The author does a great job saying you are not your thoughts. It is possible to just accept obsessive, negative, or irrational thoughts and shut them down. This will take practice. The idea that thinking everything through is necessary is not true. If you just repeatedly think about something does not lead to better decision making. It has the opposite effect. Instead it causes dread, anxiety, and feeling overwhelmed. So, that makes complete sense to me. The next big point was about constantly assigning blame to others behavior as though we are mind readers. Then this can lead to resentment and anger. We often think our perception is the only one and it is often wrong. It would be much better to simply let others think as they like and not have to be ‘right’. That sounds easy, but I think it is often hard to do, but it would make life much easier. Last, liked suggestion that you come up with a saying that you repeat that is productive. If you are stuck in a negative thought pattern, remind yourself you can handle it, want to be calm, and can stop doing this. It is possible to look at things in a different way. The only suggestion I have is I wish the book had the reading part and a separate section for the exercises to practice. That would make it easier to have a section to refer to and practice the exercises. Overall though, I thought this book was very helpful. I usually don’t like self-help books much, but this one recommends accepting responsibility for our actions and then actively doing something fairly simple to stop this. The goal is to make progress and not seek perfection. We can acknowledge making a mistake, take responsibility for it, make amends, and then drop it. We do not need to then revisit what happened and think it over a little more. Thank you NetGalley, Nancy Colier, and New Harbinger Publications for a copy of this book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tara

    ‘Can’t stop thinking’ is a quick, easy read exploring the ins and outs of the kind of overthinking that makes the world feel like it’s ending immanently. I picked this book up because I’m constantly in one cycle of obsessive thinking or another and thought it couldn’t hurt to get some pointers. The book provides a gentle introduction into the use of mindfulness and acceptance and commitment therapy to help the reader disconnect from their unhealthy thoughts, and become more aware of when their t ‘Can’t stop thinking’ is a quick, easy read exploring the ins and outs of the kind of overthinking that makes the world feel like it’s ending immanently. I picked this book up because I’m constantly in one cycle of obsessive thinking or another and thought it couldn’t hurt to get some pointers. The book provides a gentle introduction into the use of mindfulness and acceptance and commitment therapy to help the reader disconnect from their unhealthy thoughts, and become more aware of when their thoughts are more harmful than helpful. I really enjoyed the chapters talking about self-imposed victimhood, because shamefully they felt like a real reflection of my negative headspace. ‘With all our righteous rightness, we succeed only at building ourselves a cage of anger, dissatisfaction and victimhood in which we then have to live’. I felt that. Going into reading this book I expected it to be simply filled with tasks to complete, but I was actually faced with a narrative that made me realise there were more than a few instances where I’d previously thought my diligent overthinking was ‘thinking carefully about the situation’ but now realise was actually ‘stupid and anger-provoking’. It felt good to be hit on the head with some common sense, backed up by the warm promise that it’s both normal and avoidable. I found that the narrative provided plenty of opportunities for self-reflection, but I think it would have benefitted from a structure on how to implement the strategies in everyday practice as is suggested. This is largely left up to the reader, which could benefit those looking for positive suggestions as opposed to an entire rehaul of how they approach thinking. I also felt that the bulk of the text centered on providing arguments for why changing your thinking is a positive, and perhaps slightly lacked in ways to actually go about this changing. While mindfulness and ACT are genuinely good approaches I felt that they weren’t the main focus of the narrative at times. I would recommend this book to anyone who suffers from chronic overthinking as it (ironically) gives you plenty to think about in terms of positive change. While it, like many other self-help books, will not be the answer to all of your problems, it’s an excellent beginners guide to reducing the impact of your negative thoughts.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Esther

    I would have rated this book 5 stars if it was setup in a more practical way. There is so much good stuff, so much wisdom and common sense there, but when presented in this textbook-like format with no way to easily browse back, find and re-read a certain topic of interest...sigh...there is no way that this book could be practically used as a standalone book. I feel it's not a great reference work. Perhaps only for therapists as complementary to sessions. The exercises are all over the place and I would have rated this book 5 stars if it was setup in a more practical way. There is so much good stuff, so much wisdom and common sense there, but when presented in this textbook-like format with no way to easily browse back, find and re-read a certain topic of interest...sigh...there is no way that this book could be practically used as a standalone book. I feel it's not a great reference work. Perhaps only for therapists as complementary to sessions. The exercises are all over the place and could have been put together in a separate booklet. Such a shame. I really appreciate everything that I've read, but I won't remember most of it, because of the way the text (isn't) organised. Free ARC by Netgalley.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Marjorie Fuchs

    This is a beautifully written, short gem of a book that I will no doubt pick up again and again. I have become increasingly interested in mindfulness and meditation – both doing it, and reading about it. This is not just another book on “how to” meditate or “how to” do mindfulness, of which there are many out there. This book offers something even more valuable than that. Whether you are a meditator or not, “Can’t Stop Thinking” will help you to disengage from the non-stop loops, the rabbit hole This is a beautifully written, short gem of a book that I will no doubt pick up again and again. I have become increasingly interested in mindfulness and meditation – both doing it, and reading about it. This is not just another book on “how to” meditate or “how to” do mindfulness, of which there are many out there. This book offers something even more valuable than that. Whether you are a meditator or not, “Can’t Stop Thinking” will help you to disengage from the non-stop loops, the rabbit holes, and the runaway trains of thoughts – usually negative ones – that consume our minds, cause us to suffer, and prevent us from feeling fulfilled and at peace. Nancy Colier tackles these loftiest of questions, which lie at the intersection of the psychological, the spiritual and the philosophical, and she does so with compassion, modesty, practicality, wisdom, honesty and humor. Ms. Colier identifies the various ways we get stuck in negative thought loops – ruminating, blaming and resenting others, blaming and criticizing ourselves, worrying about the future, regretting and rehashing the past. Most humans, I suspect, can relate to one if not all of the scenarios she describes. But far more importantly, she provides tools, guidance and exercises to learn how to get unstuck and find joy and peace in the here and now. These lessons are delivered through beautiful prose, short digestible chapters, relatable anecdotes, and short exercises, and always in a tone of kindness and compassion. As Ms. Colier acknowledges and explains, recovering from our addiction to ruminating and over-thinking is a life-long process, not an overnight fix. This is one of those books that I will keep on my bedside table and pick up for a quick refresher course and dose of inspiration, as and when needed.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Reader Prescription

    Would you like to learn how to exit from repetitive thinking, rumination,and destructive self criticism? All you need are some tools , to bring about some self-compassion, peace of mind, and to have a more joyous life !! SIGN .ME .UP!!! The newest research , and easy to read book is called , CAN’T STOP THINKING by Nancy Colier! How do we respond to our life? Life is not always pleasing or painless. This book shows us how to relate to our thoughts. You know those bouncing, rollercoaster , terrifying, d Would you like to learn how to exit from repetitive thinking, rumination,and destructive self criticism? All you need are some tools , to bring about some self-compassion, peace of mind, and to have a more joyous life !! SIGN .ME .UP!!! The newest research , and easy to read book is called , CAN’T STOP THINKING by Nancy Colier! How do we respond to our life? Life is not always pleasing or painless. This book shows us how to relate to our thoughts. You know those bouncing, rollercoaster , terrifying, disastrous ones? “Disastrous thinking is the thief of joy!” The horror of these thoughts are only thoughts. They don’t exist anywhere except within our mind. “Our thoughts are NOT us!!” This book, Can’t Stop Thinking, offers you powerful tools to shut off the excessive thinking. Imagine that for a few moments. (Yes, think about it :) ) Our minds are not always the appropriate tool to improve our life. The exercises in this book are designed to help you to observe and navigate your mind. Through awareness , you will find a better way of living , you will also find a sense of peace that surpasses all the understanding of the negative thinking. The author provides personal stories and exercises to use yourself. I feel this book is very timely especially during this COVID 19 pandemic era. Special thanks to NetGalley and New Harbinger Publications, Inc. for sharing this digital review copy with me in exchange for an honest review. #CantStopThinking #NetGalley

  9. 5 out of 5

    Amy Belkin

    Take note: Can’t Stop Thinking by Nancy Colier is a radical book! In a mere 146 pages, it has the potential to transform the reader’s life to its core. Presenting information from anthropology, psychology, and spirituality as well as offering evocative questions and contemplative exercises, Colier helps us understand our frequently dysfunctional relationship with thinking so as to release its hold on who we “think” we are. What a relief! The numerous subjects, many with provocative titles such a Take note: Can’t Stop Thinking by Nancy Colier is a radical book! In a mere 146 pages, it has the potential to transform the reader’s life to its core. Presenting information from anthropology, psychology, and spirituality as well as offering evocative questions and contemplative exercises, Colier helps us understand our frequently dysfunctional relationship with thinking so as to release its hold on who we “think” we are. What a relief! The numerous subjects, many with provocative titles such as “Discover the You That’s Bigger Than Thought,” led me to profound contemplations, and I suggest that readers take time to allow each topic’s valuable insights to emerge and become a part of their lives. Actually, this book deserves to be read several times for it is abundant with wisdom and revelations. In truth, Nancy Colier is a gifted teacher who compassionately and skillfully presents a clear path to move us beyond our identification with incessant everyday thinking. But then she goes even further and reveals a greater perspective of who we are and the freedom that’s possible beyond the chains of thought.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sashka Stojakov

    This was an ARC by Netgalley. This book partially gave me what I expected: I wanted ideas on how to stop ruminating, examples as well as exercises, this is all that awaits you. Examples were good, most of them reminded me of myself or someone close to me. However, I didn’t enjoy the exercises that much because I had the feeling they would work better only if you did them on a therapy session. When I tried doing them on my own, I would often end up skipping or ignoring, then returning to them unt This was an ARC by Netgalley. This book partially gave me what I expected: I wanted ideas on how to stop ruminating, examples as well as exercises, this is all that awaits you. Examples were good, most of them reminded me of myself or someone close to me. However, I didn’t enjoy the exercises that much because I had the feeling they would work better only if you did them on a therapy session. When I tried doing them on my own, I would often end up skipping or ignoring, then returning to them until I have completed them. Had these exercises been created differently, it would have been less complicated for the reader. In addition, I enjoyed certain ideas in the book. Until reading the book, I didn’t realize how much thoughts can be burdening and overwhelming, especially when we are creating the problem out of nothing. I am happy I had the chance to read this book and learn something new which I will try to implement in the future.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Panda Incognito

    This is a good book for people who struggle with overthinking, worry, self-blaming thoughts, rehearsing past grievances, and intrusive thoughts. However, even though I would recommend it, I deeply disagree with many of the author's philosophical presuppositions, and was only interested in the practical advice. This book also could have been organized in a more helpful way. Sometimes, the exposition is overly long-winded, burying key practical points in the author's life reflection. It would also This is a good book for people who struggle with overthinking, worry, self-blaming thoughts, rehearsing past grievances, and intrusive thoughts. However, even though I would recommend it, I deeply disagree with many of the author's philosophical presuppositions, and was only interested in the practical advice. This book also could have been organized in a more helpful way. Sometimes, the exposition is overly long-winded, burying key practical points in the author's life reflection. It would also be easier for readers to remember and apply the author's advice if the book had included self-evaluation checklists and lists of key ideas, and if the practical exercises had appeared at the end of each chapter, instead of appearing at random intervals within the text.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Elise Farand

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The author provides a solid introduction to overthinking and thinking as an addiction. Several real-life examples from clients are included, and - if you’re an over thinker - will likely resonate with you. Hello, validation! In terms of tools, I was hungry for more. The exercises that are included provide a good starting point; however, they did not feel groundbreaking. The book essentially encourages mindfulness and “getting out of your head” by realizing that you are not your thoughts. For me, The author provides a solid introduction to overthinking and thinking as an addiction. Several real-life examples from clients are included, and - if you’re an over thinker - will likely resonate with you. Hello, validation! In terms of tools, I was hungry for more. The exercises that are included provide a good starting point; however, they did not feel groundbreaking. The book essentially encourages mindfulness and “getting out of your head” by realizing that you are not your thoughts. For me, this did not provide enough guidance for proper behaviour intervention. It is, however, good food for thought!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    One of the better mindfulness books I've read. The portion about "surrender" toward the end was very much employable and appreciated. One of the better mindfulness books I've read. The portion about "surrender" toward the end was very much employable and appreciated.

  14. 5 out of 5

    L.A. Jacob

    You can be addicted to thinking. That's the take-away of this slim book. Treat your thinking/ruminating like an addiction. Not really thrilled with that premise. You can be addicted to thinking. That's the take-away of this slim book. Treat your thinking/ruminating like an addiction. Not really thrilled with that premise.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Iris

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sheri Koller

  17. 4 out of 5

    Keith

  18. 5 out of 5

    FirefliesAndFables

  19. 4 out of 5

    Janessa Baldina

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ron Rudis

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tina Rice

  22. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  24. 4 out of 5

    Combo

  25. 4 out of 5

    Debra

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cath

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alexandria

  28. 4 out of 5

    Marissa

  29. 5 out of 5

    Pat Sobel

  30. 5 out of 5

    Laurel

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