counter create hit The Fear - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Fear

Availability: Ready to download

Two women quarantined together. A world falling into chaos. When a virus sweeps across the globe, cities and entire countries shut down overnight. The Fear zooms in on a married couple, Ash and Jack, in one small apartment, growing restless and claustrophobic and paranoid. People are dying in droves. Governments are toppling, imploding, lashing out. Martial law, police stat Two women quarantined together. A world falling into chaos. When a virus sweeps across the globe, cities and entire countries shut down overnight. The Fear zooms in on a married couple, Ash and Jack, in one small apartment, growing restless and claustrophobic and paranoid. People are dying in droves. Governments are toppling, imploding, lashing out. Martial law, police states, riots, bioterrorism. No one knows what to believe, who to trust. As the horror ramps up to apocalyptic levels, Jack is slowly unraveling. She shuts herself away and fears everything. Fears the virus has crawled its way inside, down her throat, into the lining of her stomach. Ash is afraid, too—afraid of what her increasingly erratic wife will do to her. In a pandemic none of us are ready for, should we fear the outside world . . . or what's waiting within?


Compare
Ads Banner

Two women quarantined together. A world falling into chaos. When a virus sweeps across the globe, cities and entire countries shut down overnight. The Fear zooms in on a married couple, Ash and Jack, in one small apartment, growing restless and claustrophobic and paranoid. People are dying in droves. Governments are toppling, imploding, lashing out. Martial law, police stat Two women quarantined together. A world falling into chaos. When a virus sweeps across the globe, cities and entire countries shut down overnight. The Fear zooms in on a married couple, Ash and Jack, in one small apartment, growing restless and claustrophobic and paranoid. People are dying in droves. Governments are toppling, imploding, lashing out. Martial law, police states, riots, bioterrorism. No one knows what to believe, who to trust. As the horror ramps up to apocalyptic levels, Jack is slowly unraveling. She shuts herself away and fears everything. Fears the virus has crawled its way inside, down her throat, into the lining of her stomach. Ash is afraid, too—afraid of what her increasingly erratic wife will do to her. In a pandemic none of us are ready for, should we fear the outside world . . . or what's waiting within?

30 review for The Fear

  1. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    I'll be honest and say that the cover of this drew me in and the idea of a "Pandemic" horror story was all I needed to know to download this. I was worried that perhaps this would be too scary, too realistic, in these current times we're living in but I needn't have worried. Ugh. It has a strong start and I was excited to see where the author was going to take us. Unfortunately it's a repetitive ride. Page after page after page of the same thing. Ash (Ashley) and Jack (Jacqueline) are under quar I'll be honest and say that the cover of this drew me in and the idea of a "Pandemic" horror story was all I needed to know to download this. I was worried that perhaps this would be too scary, too realistic, in these current times we're living in but I needn't have worried. Ugh. It has a strong start and I was excited to see where the author was going to take us. Unfortunately it's a repetitive ride. Page after page after page of the same thing. Ash (Ashley) and Jack (Jacqueline) are under quarantine. Jack suffers from mental illness which has been exacerbated by being recently attacked by a man they refer to now as The Cardigan Man rendering her nearly agoraphobic. Due to Jack's instability she has cocooned herself in the bedroom while Ashley tries to keep it together in the living room - and that's the plot. Jack's craziness drove me bonkers and if I had to hear about "The Cardigan Man" one more time I was going to throw my kindle at the wall. The ending was pretty disappointing with a fantastical twist that made no sense whatsoever. I'm sure some folks will probably dig this but I'm not one of them. 2 stars! Thank you to NetGalley and Nerdy Wordsmith for providing me with a digital ARC in exchange for my honest review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sadie Hartmann Mother Horror

    I started this book around the time that I got it, early August 2020 but then I set it down for a spell. Why? It was triggering my already heightened anxiety at the time. This is a story about a pandemic. And quarantine. And psychological horror. So as a citizen of the US living in the 'right now' world of Covid-19 and the Trump administration...this book presents some challenges for emotional readers who bring all of that into the book with them. That being said, due to the fact that this book i I started this book around the time that I got it, early August 2020 but then I set it down for a spell. Why? It was triggering my already heightened anxiety at the time. This is a story about a pandemic. And quarantine. And psychological horror. So as a citizen of the US living in the 'right now' world of Covid-19 and the Trump administration...this book presents some challenges for emotional readers who bring all of that into the book with them. That being said, due to the fact that this book is also a Night Worms buddy read with some of my team members, I binge-read the last two-thirds before the presidential debates last night to make my deadline. I'm giving you, the readers, all this personal context because it's relevant. Instead of re-imagining the plot summary on the back of the book, I'll just highlight the important details: Ashley & Jaqueline are a married couple who find themselves quarantined in their apartment as a virus spreads wildly out of control. The women are already vulnerable and mentally unstable due to the fact they fled the area where they were the targets of a hate crime and are hoping to rebuild their lives in a new city. Their hopes are dashed. Jack, having suffered the most psychological trauma is not handling pandemic-life well and the world is in total chaos. I'll admit, I have Coronavirus burn-out. I'm tired of thinking about it, talking about it and the current administration's downplaying of it gives me anxiety and an unhealthy fear that it will never go away. Couple these feelings with all the side-effects like being too housebound and the family being around each other too much--I'm living through my own isolation/cabin-fever story so this particular book was too on the nose for me but it's going to AMAZING 10 years from now as an accurate representation of how events played out. I loved when Hamilton took this tale into new territory and into more fictional storytelling--veering away from the narrative being almost non-fiction and emotionally exhausting. The body horror elements saved the day. I enjoyed the representation of a gay couple, I think Hamilton handled that well and I applaud authors who bravely go outside their comfort zone to give us minority representation and normalization (here's where I suggest that *if you're an author thinking about doing that, have a sensitivity reader-Hamilton identifies in the back of the book that he had one. I think that's really important enough for me to mention) Lastly, I wrote in my notes "Kate Austin problems" Evangeline Lilly is the actress who played Kate Austin in LOST and she has this horrible habit of overly using her co-star's stage name. It's like every other line. That's not a screenplay thing because none of the other actors did it, it's a HER problem. And the characters in this book do it too. They say each other's names more than actual people would ever do and it made me hyper-sensitive to it and also drew my attention to other repetitions. Something an editor could (should?) spot and eliminate. Final thoughts: This is a modern pandemic/apocalyptic horror with social commentary and a sweet-spot for the supernatural and body horror. I enjoyed the psychological notes and character development but feel very strongly that this book could have used more editing (There is mention of a team of editors in the back of the book but maybe this just slipped through the cracks?). A great introduction to this author's work.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Janelle Janson

    First, I have to mention that Spencer Hamilton knocked it out of the park with this promo package. He sent me a copy of the book, a sticker, and an awesome COVID-19 mask. It’s adjustable and doesn’t feel suffocating. Kudos Mr. Hamilton! THE FEAR is a mix of global pandemic, body horror, and social commentary. We follow married couple, Ashley and Jacqueline, and their descent into fear and paranoia when a viral pandemic spreads across the world causing chaos and turmoil everywhere they look. Things First, I have to mention that Spencer Hamilton knocked it out of the park with this promo package. He sent me a copy of the book, a sticker, and an awesome COVID-19 mask. It’s adjustable and doesn’t feel suffocating. Kudos Mr. Hamilton! THE FEAR is a mix of global pandemic, body horror, and social commentary. We follow married couple, Ashley and Jacqueline, and their descent into fear and paranoia when a viral pandemic spreads across the world causing chaos and turmoil everywhere they look. Things hit an apocalyptic level with rioting, martial law, and police states. Sound familiar? There are themes of mental illness and racial prejudice which really add to the psychological element. The body horror element is PRESENT. And let me tell you, there are some cringe-inducing scenes, so beware. It can be a tricky thing to write a book about the current state of the world, even with a horror twist, but I thought the author did well here. The story is compelling and gripped me to the last page. My only issue is some parts are a tiny bit repetitive. I read fast so I’ll admit I took in a lot right away and skimmed those parts. All in all, I thought THE FEAR was well done with an ending that surprised me. Definitely worth picking up if you’re curious!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Richelle SheReadsHorror

    Review of The Fear by Spencer Hamilton I recently watched a horror documentary on the history of horror movies. There was a quote made by Stuart Gordon that relates to horror books too and especially this one in particular. “𝐇𝐨𝐫𝐫𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞’𝐬 𝐚 𝐫𝐞𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐠𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐧𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭. 𝐖𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐬𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐞𝐬 𝐮𝐬 𝐬𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐚 𝐥𝐨𝐭 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐬𝐨𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐭𝐲.” - 𝐒𝐭𝐮𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐆𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐨𝐧 Out of all the dystopian, apolitical books that are coming out recently, this one will be the one that is set apart from the rest. Spencer Hamilton took bits of our Review of The Fear by Spencer Hamilton I recently watched a horror documentary on the history of horror movies. There was a quote made by Stuart Gordon that relates to horror books too and especially this one in particular. “𝐇𝐨𝐫𝐫𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞’𝐬 𝐚 𝐫𝐞𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐠𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐧𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭. 𝐖𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐬𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐞𝐬 𝐮𝐬 𝐬𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐚 𝐥𝐨𝐭 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐬𝐨𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐭𝐲.” - 𝐒𝐭𝐮𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐆𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐨𝐧 Out of all the dystopian, apolitical books that are coming out recently, this one will be the one that is set apart from the rest. Spencer Hamilton took bits of our pandemic history and included it in his novel for generations to come that never knew or kept up with what was happening in the world. This will be the depiction of our history told in a horror novel. The sub genres labeled for this book in my eyes would be pandemic, psychology, body and cosmic horror. Synopsis: As the virus sweeps the globe, the governments are toppling, imploding and lashing out. Ash and Jack are cooped up in their apartment growing claustrophobic and paranoid. Jack thinks she’s infected and Ash fears for what her wife will do. While the pandemic is raging outside, should we be more afraid of what’s within? “𝐮𝐬𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐟𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝐚𝐠𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦, 𝐛𝐞𝐜𝐚𝐮𝐬𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭’𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐢𝐬, 𝐢𝐭’𝐬 𝐟𝐞𝐚𝐫.” - 𝐒𝐩𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐫 𝐇𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐥𝐭𝐨𝐧 I just want to say “wow” this book was a trip! I think I had to put it down several times because my anxiety kept welling up and I needed a breather. I really enjoyed the epigraphs that were included before each chapter. Everytime I read one of the quotes I thought about what I was going through at the time and what would happen to the characters next. It's scary to think some of the news headlines and tweets happened only months ago. This book played on many of my own fears and anxieties. I thought about The Shining and how Jack Torrence went mad in isolation, Ha! Wait did I just catch that. I also loved the LGBTQ representations and some of the experiences they face and gaslighting are ones that I faced in highschool. I don’t live with it everyday but I do still deal with self doubt and insecurities. I rated this book 4.5 ⭐️ only because it just barely missed the emotional mark for me. There were two scenes in particular that almost had me if it had a little time to simmer. Personal note: possible spoiler so come back and read this when you finish the book. I wanted to add this note in after seeing the negative reviews “The Fear” is getting. I’m not sure if the people that read this book are standing up for the LGBTQ community or just judging from what’s on the surface but as a woman that is bisexual I resonated with jack’s character. I myself face struggles with my identity and think about the things people told me growing up. I sometimes wonder if their words and actions changed my life course in some way. I love my husband and child but I still struggle with wondering where I would have been if I would have had that support when I came out as a lesbian. Before I was told to experiment with men. Would I have been with my husband? I try to think of it as a blessing in disguise. Not all of our stories are the same and not everyone is so sure of themselves and just know right away what their sexual orientation is. This is the first book that I actually connected with that showed some of my inner struggles with identity. Hopefully whoever sees this will understand and think about this character on a deeper level.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Keely

    3.5/5 rounded up for Goodreads. The Fear is a novel that addresses one of the main downfalls that 2020 had to offer, the Covid-19 pandemic. The story follows Ashley and Jack, two married women that move to Austin, Texas and shortly after become victims of a hate crime. Ashley, being confident and unconditionally supportive of her wife during the aftermath, including post-traumatic stress, from the previously mentioned violent attack, navigates the rapidly changing world after she receives the new 3.5/5 rounded up for Goodreads. The Fear is a novel that addresses one of the main downfalls that 2020 had to offer, the Covid-19 pandemic. The story follows Ashley and Jack, two married women that move to Austin, Texas and shortly after become victims of a hate crime. Ashley, being confident and unconditionally supportive of her wife during the aftermath, including post-traumatic stress, from the previously mentioned violent attack, navigates the rapidly changing world after she receives the news of the pandemic plaguing the world. Jack meanwhile, becomes agoraphobic and struggles to maintain her grip on reality as she tries to deal with the results of being attacked and the guilt of relying solely on her wife to both emotionally and financially support them through the current global crisis. I was really excited about this novel when I was approached by the author to review a copy of this book. A pandemic horror story while we are currently dealing with one, yes please! I am nothing but a glutton for self-punishment. However, I did not realize that the events in the novel would be blurring the lines between fiction and non-fiction. I guess it never really dawned on me that the pandemic being written about in the story would be so current and it felt kind of exhausting to read about it. However, there were some events that clearly did not happen to me personally or to anyone that I know, particularly towards the end, that made this novel feel more like the fictional horror story that I was looking for. There were quite a few times that I felt like the narration from Jack’s character became redundant and I start to get slightly annoyed reading from her point of view. Then I remembered that she is suffering immensely from mental illness and I couldn’t help but feel slightly guilty that I was annoyed with this fictional character and it ultimately left me feeling fairly confused about how I felt about her. There were several chapters where I felt like the characters names were being overused when I clearly knew who the author was referring to, it felt like every fifth word was either “Ash” or “Jack” and it occasionally became distracting. Grievances aside, Hamilton has a knack for writing a slow decent into madness and I am here for all of those downward spirals! The transformation within both of our leading ladies at the end of the novel is extremely satisfying and I would love to read more by this author.

  6. 5 out of 5

    TheCrookedHouse

    Wow. I'm seeing some of the reviews for this one and let's be honest, some people are ripping it apart and calling it torture porn. I respect these opinions but have to respectfully disagree. This is BODY HORROR. yeah. It's a thing. After reading this book, I asked Spencer if he had taken inspiration from Kathe Koja, because this was sooooo much like Koja's storylines. I was actually surprised when he said he had never read any of her stuff. Koja is different in that her stories are all lyrical w Wow. I'm seeing some of the reviews for this one and let's be honest, some people are ripping it apart and calling it torture porn. I respect these opinions but have to respectfully disagree. This is BODY HORROR. yeah. It's a thing. After reading this book, I asked Spencer if he had taken inspiration from Kathe Koja, because this was sooooo much like Koja's storylines. I was actually surprised when he said he had never read any of her stuff. Koja is different in that her stories are all lyrical with a fevered dream quality. The Fear was very modern and easy to decipher, as far as what was going on. What was going on, you ask? Well, this story is about a gay couple, Jacqueline and Ashley, living during the current pandemic that is now our everyday reality. Ashley is of Chinese descent and Jacqueline suffers from mental illness. How they handle the everyday issues of intolerance, racism and contagion is what this book is about. These are all issues that we are pretty familiar with but Spencer takes it one step further and creates a nightmare situation for our characters, and this is where the horror story truly takes shape. I enjoyed how this story built up and then transformed into something supernatural. It was an absolute treat to read this and anyone that has read and enjoyed body horror and pandemic stories will agree with me. I have zero doubts about that. I received a copy of this book from the author in exchange for an honest review. HONESTLY. I put this in the category of BODY HORROR and PSYCHOLOGICAL HORROR. I also put this book on my shelf alongside Poppy Z Brite and Kathe Koja. Hell...I put it alongside my entire Dell Abyss Collection. This book would have been scouted for the Dell Abyss Line back in the 90s. I guarantee it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Heather Horror Hellion

    This book managed to take quarantine and made it scarier. I loved the characters in the book. They were such well written women. They were written in a way that you agreed with them both. I wanted to like his likeable characters and I hated a couple of them so much. I loved that the Author put present day quotes and it really plays off of the fear of everything that has been going on. I don't think I'm going to complain anymore about being in my house. I took off a star due to a few of the senten This book managed to take quarantine and made it scarier. I loved the characters in the book. They were such well written women. They were written in a way that you agreed with them both. I wanted to like his likeable characters and I hated a couple of them so much. I loved that the Author put present day quotes and it really plays off of the fear of everything that has been going on. I don't think I'm going to complain anymore about being in my house. I took off a star due to a few of the sentences being repetitive.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mona Kabbani

    “The Fear grew.” Think you can fair well in an apocalyptic pandemic? Think again. Jacqueline and Ashley, a married couple living in Texas, are trying to create the perfect life for themselves. A beautiful home, weekend activities like watching Jaws in the park, and good ol’ intimate fun. That is, until the pandemic hits. See, the thing about a stay-at-home order is that it can cause underlying anxieties to fester. Your enclosed room can become an incubator for paranoia, claustrophobia, and Fear. “The Fear grew.” Think you can fair well in an apocalyptic pandemic? Think again. Jacqueline and Ashley, a married couple living in Texas, are trying to create the perfect life for themselves. A beautiful home, weekend activities like watching Jaws in the park, and good ol’ intimate fun. That is, until the pandemic hits. See, the thing about a stay-at-home order is that it can cause underlying anxieties to fester. Your enclosed room can become an incubator for paranoia, claustrophobia, and Fear. How long do you think you could stave off the anxiety before the Fear completely consumes you? Ahhhh!!! This book was EXCELLENT! Especially for this time and place right now, it felt like a psychotic homage to all the struggles we are going through mentally. I’ll definitely have to read it again in a few years once all this pandemic stuff is behind us to see how I process it but it’s a perfect exaggeration of what we’ve all felt when the pandemic started. My one warning is that this book is heavily intimate with the psychology of paranoia and claustrophobia so if you have anxiety regarding these items, read cautiously. That being said, this book is character driven. It’s an in depth dive into two peoples’ minds during an apocalyptic pandemic so there’s no action/adventure and there’s really only one scene. But listen to me, this book has so much going on, it reads like an action/adventure! Absolutely engrossing and fast paced. And as a psychology nerd, it was a treat to read. This is probably my most favorite book of 2020 honestly. And I’m going to STRONGLY encourage everyone to pick up a copy once it releases August 11!!!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Michael Benavidez

    I received a free copy of the book by the author, however I also bought the fucking thing to have some skin in the game. Why? Cuz it's a good book. Also I like having physical copies of the things I'm reading. Screens hurt my fragile eyes. A Pandemic Horror Story is what it's labeled as, and as such it's pretty timely in its narrative. Whether it affected me because I'm a Texan, I'm a minority that's faced a few of the things the characters here have gone through, or because the Covid pandemic has I received a free copy of the book by the author, however I also bought the fucking thing to have some skin in the game. Why? Cuz it's a good book. Also I like having physical copies of the things I'm reading. Screens hurt my fragile eyes. A Pandemic Horror Story is what it's labeled as, and as such it's pretty timely in its narrative. Whether it affected me because I'm a Texan, I'm a minority that's faced a few of the things the characters here have gone through, or because the Covid pandemic has yet to reveal any end in sight, I am still uncertain. As it is, the story takes our two protagonists, a newlywed couple that each have baggage of their own to work on, through the beginnings of the Covid crisis and works it into something. There's a very real element at play here. From the homophobia, the racism, the fear that this virus instilled in people at its beginnings, really deliver a fast pace beginning that slip into something in the lines of The Shining. It becomes a small scaled claustrophobic tale that hangs on the two main characters, where time ceases to exist. Time ceases to be a meaningful character as it wibble wobbles through, becoming less and less part of the plot as the mental health and situations begin to wibble wobble into insanity. Spencer writes in a way that seems like a nice slow start, and then shifts gears several times, speeding along into something that's expected and yet unexpected all at once. This isn't to say it's without its flaws. I do feel like the beginning could have been stretched a bit further, getting a better grasp and full view of the characters, as well as the oncoming storm that is the Covid fear. There are certain things that did feel out of place in the very real world setting, that had it not been set in Texas, and having a grasp on what it's like here, it would not have been as believable as it was. But these are just nitpicks, things that I would have liked to relish in more. however, as it stands, the story is a delicious read that may spike the anxiety (it did mine), and despite it's decently long length, a fast read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Aiden

    "Stephen King's The Stand could literally be the death of her." When we started 2020 words such as pandemic and social distancing wasn't mentioned on a day to day basis but now it's a way of life. In times of a pandemic I thought it would be a great idea to escape in books and read about a pandemic... The Fear is a pandemic based horror loosely inspired on the Covid-19 situation but much more dramatic and horrific as we follow Jacqueline (Jack) and Ashley (Ash) alone in a small apartment with The "Stephen King's The Stand could literally be the death of her." When we started 2020 words such as pandemic and social distancing wasn't mentioned on a day to day basis but now it's a way of life. In times of a pandemic I thought it would be a great idea to escape in books and read about a pandemic... The Fear is a pandemic based horror loosely inspired on the Covid-19 situation but much more dramatic and horrific as we follow Jacqueline (Jack) and Ashley (Ash) alone in a small apartment with The Fear. The women slowly become restless and paranoid and lash out at each other as Jack slowly loses her mind, resulting in her shutting herself away as she convinces herself the virus is inside her becoming more erratic. This was a brilliant book and I thoroughly enjoyed it and I know for sure a lot of you guys would enjoy it too. The descreptive language was superb I especially enjoyed the description of Jack's swelling feet. I was left shocked and repulsed. I must mention the Cardigan man what a brilliant character which I felt amplified the sporadity of Jack as a character and brought a different dimension of horror to the novel. I felt like the Cardigan man was Jack's devil on her shoulder. As the book develops Jack becomes more delerious leaving Ash in a difficult situation does she protect herself or the woman she loves. This book excelled in psychological horror as its heavily influenced on paranoia and claustrophobia which at times left me feeling uneasy. That being said this book is heavily character driven thankfully the two main characters gave us a greater insight into how the human mind copes with isolation and change. I often find horror books are difficult to end and feel that they finish abruptly but with The Fear the last couple chapters were probably the best and it ended naturally.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Keith Miller

    This book is a 4.5 out of 5 for me. I truly enjoyed this novel, pandemic horror is one of my favorite sub genres. The novel is very character driven, and I find it beautiful how an author can put you inside the mind of a character and slowly show the snowball of being isolated and living in fear. Ash and Jack are two phenomenal characters and I find that anyone who reads the novel can relate to them! I also love the feel of this novel. The claustrophobic setting really plays a huge role in the n This book is a 4.5 out of 5 for me. I truly enjoyed this novel, pandemic horror is one of my favorite sub genres. The novel is very character driven, and I find it beautiful how an author can put you inside the mind of a character and slowly show the snowball of being isolated and living in fear. Ash and Jack are two phenomenal characters and I find that anyone who reads the novel can relate to them! I also love the feel of this novel. The claustrophobic setting really plays a huge role in the novel and is beautifully woven into the novel. I highly recommend this novel!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    I figured this book would be fitting for the time that we are in, and it mostly is, but it is also extremely weird. Ash and Jack have just moved to Austin. On their first day in town, they go to see Jaws at the river. When they are walking home they get harassed by a guy, later dubbed the Cardigan Man. Jack has always had fragile mental health and this is the last straw. They move again and this all happens when the US goes into lockdown due to the virus. More harassing and fever dreams ensue. As I figured this book would be fitting for the time that we are in, and it mostly is, but it is also extremely weird. Ash and Jack have just moved to Austin. On their first day in town, they go to see Jaws at the river. When they are walking home they get harassed by a guy, later dubbed the Cardigan Man. Jack has always had fragile mental health and this is the last straw. They move again and this all happens when the US goes into lockdown due to the virus. More harassing and fever dreams ensue. Ash tries to hold her own, but they get locked into their building by their crazy landlord who shoots people who try to break out. Turns out Cardigan Man lives in their building and is helping their landlord. Jack has a full mental breakdown and Ash is trying to make the best of living on the food they have and being confined to their small living room. I mean I honestly don't have clue what I actually just read. At first, I thought this seems fitting for the time, two women being harassed for being gay, mental issue, the pandemic, all seems logical and the making of an ok story. But it was hard to read, hard to follow, and the ending? Did I just read a weird fantasy novel? I have no clue. This book has me so confused I have a hard time formulating a review, and not in a good way! *ARC received in exchange for an honest review*

  13. 5 out of 5

    Michael Goodwin

    THE FEAR starts with cautious optimism, and ends with hard fought-for freedom. This is how many of us likely felt entering and exiting the period of COVID quarantine here in the US, which matches the timeline of this book. This book shines in its portrayal of the declining mental state of both of the main characters, Ash and Jack. The gradual descent into the parts of their own minds that house the darkest parts of them felt very real and was quite gripping. THE FEAR is well-written overall and wa THE FEAR starts with cautious optimism, and ends with hard fought-for freedom. This is how many of us likely felt entering and exiting the period of COVID quarantine here in the US, which matches the timeline of this book. This book shines in its portrayal of the declining mental state of both of the main characters, Ash and Jack. The gradual descent into the parts of their own minds that house the darkest parts of them felt very real and was quite gripping. THE FEAR is well-written overall and was a fast read, and I would recommend any horror aficionado to read it. Fans of King will see the influence he had on this writer's ability to describe the grotesque and unpalatable. Certain parts of the story felt unnecessary, a distraction from what was really going on, while others were littered with brobdingnagian vocabulary that sometimes impeded this reader's ability to understand the author's intent. The ending felt a bit rushed and was over too soon, but I've heard that's a sign of a good book: it leaves you wanting more. I did enjoy reading THE FEAR, and will certainly seek out other titles from this author in the future.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Octavia (ReadsWithDogs)

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I was excited to read a horror story set in our current time and climate because let's be real: 2020 is its own special horror story. The Fear started out promising enough with Ash and Jack, a lesbian couple in a new city when Covid begins rapidly spreading and the pandemic panic begins and they find themselves stuck in their new apartment. I liked how each chapter started with an actual tweet from our current president. I also liked the realistic portrayal of trying to grocery shop at the begin I was excited to read a horror story set in our current time and climate because let's be real: 2020 is its own special horror story. The Fear started out promising enough with Ash and Jack, a lesbian couple in a new city when Covid begins rapidly spreading and the pandemic panic begins and they find themselves stuck in their new apartment. I liked how each chapter started with an actual tweet from our current president. I also liked the realistic portrayal of trying to grocery shop at the beginning of the panic. I didn't like the way Ash and Jack were written. One character has some mental health problems and it results in her not leaving her room and hallucinating a man to have sex with... 🙄 I got annoyed and bored with the plot and super sick of the Cardigan Man (a homophobic and racist hipster) and the ending made no sense. The end was some weird fantasy novel twist that felt totally unrelated to the rest of the story. If you're into body horror and looking for something to read that will make you squirm The Fear will do it. Just be warned there's some Stephen King-style bad sex scenes and the end is hella weird.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Aina

    Reading a pandemic horror during a pandemic? What was I thinking? Yet this book caught my attention and didn't let go until the end. It feels very relevant and yet different enough from the current real world situation for me to be able to consume it. I thought the writing is great, and the way madness seeps into the characters' minds is both horrifying and sad. That said, I found the middle of the book really repetitive. I also didn't really buy the setup because it feels contrived. The book at Reading a pandemic horror during a pandemic? What was I thinking? Yet this book caught my attention and didn't let go until the end. It feels very relevant and yet different enough from the current real world situation for me to be able to consume it. I thought the writing is great, and the way madness seeps into the characters' minds is both horrifying and sad. That said, I found the middle of the book really repetitive. I also didn't really buy the setup because it feels contrived. The book attempts to make it as close to real life as possible (the real tweets at the beginning of each chapter is an example) yet the characters have isolated themselves for no good reason from the beginning. The villains are obviously evil, there's nothing subtle at all about them. The ending suddenly veers into the fantastical out of nowhere. I'm not an own voice reviewer so I can't speak to the portrayal of one of the characters' struggle with sexuality, but it felt kind of gratuitous at times. Overall, I think this book is still an enjoyable short read but just misses the mark for me. Thank you to the author for a review copy. book blog | twitter | instagram

  16. 4 out of 5

    Misha Ferrell

    Holy cow this was a wild ride. 5/5 ⭐️. This book needs no synopsis because the reader needs to go in blind. It's weird and fun and just what I want in my horror.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    3.5, rounded up for Goodreads! This is probably the most interesting pandemic (apocalyptic? dystopian?) book I have read this year. The Fear starts at the beginning of this year's COVID pandemic and parallels almost exactly what happens in the real world...complete with, now hilariously not so well aged, quotes from Trump. That could be a horror all on its own. The Fear is for body horror fans (Hello!), the main characters are a married lesbian couple (I was hesitant about this at first, with Hami 3.5, rounded up for Goodreads! This is probably the most interesting pandemic (apocalyptic? dystopian?) book I have read this year. The Fear starts at the beginning of this year's COVID pandemic and parallels almost exactly what happens in the real world...complete with, now hilariously not so well aged, quotes from Trump. That could be a horror all on its own. The Fear is for body horror fans (Hello!), the main characters are a married lesbian couple (I was hesitant about this at first, with Hamilton being a cis man...but he did a great job, did his research, and it's notated in the acknowledgements), psychological terrors straddling the line between reality and sick fantasy, homophobia, racism, and sexism. I got quickly invested in this book, to the point where as I continued reading and the storyline got more fantastical and demonic, I struggled to mentally draw the line between what really happened in the world during COVID and what was happening in the book. This is not a bad thing. Major props to Spencer Hamilton, remember this name! Not only is The Fear a great read, but the fact that it's self-published deserves all the respect. I enjoyed chatting with Spencer about The Fear and his self publishing process. His hard work is respected and appreciated. Shop small! Buy indie! Buy self-published!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Meigan

    This was...weird, and I mean that in a good way because I like weird. This book takes the US quarantine, injects it with steroids, drops some acid on it, and the end result is a pandemic that’s terrifying on every front. The pandemic in the THE FEAR isn’t just your run of the mill virus, or is it? Is it the quarantine that’s affecting people in the ways they act, the things they do, the words they say, the thoughts they think? Is it the virus? Is it the Orange One’s tweets? No one is safe and no This was...weird, and I mean that in a good way because I like weird. This book takes the US quarantine, injects it with steroids, drops some acid on it, and the end result is a pandemic that’s terrifying on every front. The pandemic in the THE FEAR isn’t just your run of the mill virus, or is it? Is it the quarantine that’s affecting people in the ways they act, the things they do, the words they say, the thoughts they think? Is it the virus? Is it the Orange One’s tweets? No one is safe and nothing is predictable any more and there are probably people in your closet waiting to get you. Or hiding behind your toilet, so don’t go in there. When I started reading this, I thought cool, Hamilton is spinning a tale we’ve all lived through, but now we get to see it from someone else’s perspective. But then out of nowhere, the weirdness just leaps out and things get rather dark rather quickly. Pandemics and isolation do weird things to people, but it’s especially troubling to those with mental illnesses, and one particular character is grappling with her sanity through the course of the book. Jack is paranoid, wrestling with fear and hallucinations mainly of the Cardigan Man, and that certainly added a deeper layer to the tale. I liked being inside Jack’s head and not knowing whether things were real, or a figment of her unraveling mind. Aside from the horror elements, Hamilton offers a realistic reflection on the current climate in the US, where his characters face the same bigotry that so many people are confronted with on a daily basis. Jack and Ash are lesbians, Ash is Chinese, and both have experienced plenty of abuse from strangers. Those experiences also add to their struggle during the pandemic, as such things leave scars and scars make nightmares and a scary pandemic is already enough to cause nightmares. Bottom line — THE FEAR takes the familiar old pandemic and quarantine that we’re still living in and manages to make an already horrific situation even more frightening. I definitely recommend this for anyone who likes pandemic tales and the weird and strange, because this was definitely of the weird and strange variety.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    This book started off with a phenomenal punch. Fantastic writing, a compelling opening that really draws the reader in and allows them to experience being in that terrifying moment. (Not to mention an obvious and admirable love of the movie "Jaws" that makes me want to see the movie again) I'm afraid to say that the solid one-two punch combo that brilliantly opened this book and pulled me in began to fade into what felt like half-hearted swipes of an exhausted boxer as the story moved along. The a This book started off with a phenomenal punch. Fantastic writing, a compelling opening that really draws the reader in and allows them to experience being in that terrifying moment. (Not to mention an obvious and admirable love of the movie "Jaws" that makes me want to see the movie again) I'm afraid to say that the solid one-two punch combo that brilliantly opened this book and pulled me in began to fade into what felt like half-hearted swipes of an exhausted boxer as the story moved along. The author's writing was solid enough to keep me going, despite getting frustrated with some of the repetitive elements of the madness that ended up negatively affecting the main characters relationship. I was also intrigued by the way that The Fear manifests, both mentally, as well as physically, at the end. But I wish the author had planted a few more elements hinting that would be coming earlier in the story so it didn't seem to come out of nowhere. I loved parts of this story, and hated other elements of it. But, ultimately, kudos go to Hamilton for pulling me through all the way to the end. Because, despite my frustration with some of the stretched out moments of mental descent, or with some of the details that require the reader to bite off more suspension of disbelief that can be comfortably chewed (and I'm not talking about the very end, but some of the details about the madness happening outside the apartment - that, like the book itself, started off incredibly strong, but then seemed to just peter out as the book progressed) I wanted to keep reading, to see what happens next. IE, the author knew how to keep the reader turning the pages. I did enjoy the book, loved certain elements of it, and actually cared for the characters. So kudos to the author - I'm definitely going to be checking out his other books.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Stacie

    SO I'm going to start out by saying that I did enjoy this book, and found it to be a fast read. The fear growing in the book was almost a palpable thing and I could feel my heart racing as I went on. The ACTUAL quotes of the president/news outlets/twitter at the beginning of each chapter was a real great touch that I enjoyed IMMENSELY!!! LGBT rep is always a great thing, and I feel like Spencer also did a great job with social commentary (racism and homophobia specifically). His writing can be a SO I'm going to start out by saying that I did enjoy this book, and found it to be a fast read. The fear growing in the book was almost a palpable thing and I could feel my heart racing as I went on. The ACTUAL quotes of the president/news outlets/twitter at the beginning of each chapter was a real great touch that I enjoyed IMMENSELY!!! LGBT rep is always a great thing, and I feel like Spencer also did a great job with social commentary (racism and homophobia specifically). His writing can be a bit wordy, which I don't think detracts from the quality of the book but may irk some readers. Also, there are some pretty graphic and nasty scenes with injuries and body horror type stuff that may gross you out if you have a weak stomach. There were some cons though; things seemed a bit repetitive (please say the cardigan man ONE MORE TIME), it had that weird sex stuff I HATE IN horror books (looking at you Stephen King), and while the start was INCREDIBLY strong and had me sucked in I felt confused by the end (specifically Jack's evolution; I felt it was strange and hard to follow). Jack's descent into insanity could have been a little less obvious, it seemed like she was pretty much nuts to begin with. Either way, I think Spencer is going great places with his writing and I can't wait to see what else he cooks up in that brain of his.

  21. 4 out of 5

    David Burchell

    “Here, it was oppressive. It was nothing you wanted to get caught under. It covered the land like a lead blanket and then hammered itself into place until the world couldn’t hold such a vast and growing amount of water. It came hot and heavy. It came fast and left whenever it pleased . . .” Spencer Hamilton, in this breathshattering debut, swifts us off onto the wildest of rides—a ride that, curiously, happens to be quite closely knit, decorticating the tropes and the normalcies of the convention “Here, it was oppressive. It was nothing you wanted to get caught under. It covered the land like a lead blanket and then hammered itself into place until the world couldn’t hold such a vast and growing amount of water. It came hot and heavy. It came fast and left whenever it pleased . . .” Spencer Hamilton, in this breathshattering debut, swifts us off onto the wildest of rides—a ride that, curiously, happens to be quite closely knit, decorticating the tropes and the normalcies of the conventional pandemic tale; if there is anything to say of Hamilton, it would be that he is anything but conventional. Shufted into a dark world reality almost too close to home—an existence rifled by outbroken virus, laid off and quarantined . . . sound familiar?—we are brought into the tight perspectives of an encumbered one named Ashley, and her partner, Jacqueline, a woman lost and plagued within the nightmares of herself, as they two attempt to navigate the days and weeks and months and potential years of this strange apocalypse. If you’re expecting the sprawling chaos of such scopes as The Stand or The Road or whatever other pandemic novels that take us across the many landscapes of America, this novel is not it; and to expand on that—please do heed the warning—this should not deter you. Hamilton here, in fact, constructs a masterful legerdemain, collating his joys and gems and many horrific influences into an exhibition nonetheless: a grand and specular showcase of just what can—and likely will—happen to the human mind under such contemporary, sibylline duress. Oh, and believe me, the Fear is alive and well. So as not to persist into the hinterland of spoilers, I will cut this somewhat short, with just a few more words about why YOU should grab a copy of this book about as soon as feasibly possible: The economic and yet exquisite, striking prose; the depth and nuance to the perspective characters that is rare to find—these are not flat, unwritten females but detailedly truthful personas hypersensitive to any possible out-of-whack representation; the gorgeous imageries, creativities, and innovations to the much saturated genre; and the succinct and clear evolution of the author’s abilities. From his short story collection, Kitchen Sink, to the debut of The Fear and even on and beyond, Hamilton is a one to watch. He’ll be a household name before we know it. So come on in . . . . . . the water’s warm and incredibly weird and not at all swimming with unseen and monstrous things . . . . . . you can trust me. Can’t you?

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jacob Alexander

    I loved this book. It's horribly timely, the gore is disturbing without being overplayed, and the characters are real, human and play brilliantly off each other. If proving that all it takes to leave a dark, gory imprint on the reader with just a brief touch of horror in all the stories of KITCHEN SINK wasn't enough, Spencer Hamilton is back with a longer, even more bloodthirsty taste of horror in THE FEAR. Ramping up the terror from the ominous Book One to the rampaging carnage of Book Four, Hami I loved this book. It's horribly timely, the gore is disturbing without being overplayed, and the characters are real, human and play brilliantly off each other. If proving that all it takes to leave a dark, gory imprint on the reader with just a brief touch of horror in all the stories of KITCHEN SINK wasn't enough, Spencer Hamilton is back with a longer, even more bloodthirsty taste of horror in THE FEAR. Ramping up the terror from the ominous Book One to the rampaging carnage of Book Four, Hamilton not only offers a twisted commentary on the world as it is right now, but just how much worse it could be: he flits from body horror to tense, psychological drama with the turn of a page and ramps it all the way up to 11 for a gruesome, perfect finale. Scares abound in a tight, cutting showcase of the best aspects of the genre in one fast-paced, character-driven story with copious amounts of feeling, heart and of course, blood.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joel Feldman

    A difficult to read book...not because it’s bad (4-stars), but because it fueled my anxiety. Real world events devolved into a dystopian nightmare not far from today’s reality, making it clear that we truly do live in horrific times. The downward spiral of the main characters is equally disheartening and aggravating. Easy to sympathize yet I wanted to shake them and tell them to get a grip. Well done Mr. Hamilton!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Skye

    The Fear is a pandemic based horror novel inspired by COVID-19. It follows two women (Ash and Jack) around into a tiny apartment and dives into their minds as they slowly become restless and begin to emotionally shut down. The plot was excellent and the characters were very well written. The claustrophobia and paranoia plays a really huge part in this novel making me feel really anxious and uneasy. If you enjoy psychological horror, I urge to read this one! It’s fast paced and truly horrifying. A The Fear is a pandemic based horror novel inspired by COVID-19. It follows two women (Ash and Jack) around into a tiny apartment and dives into their minds as they slowly become restless and begin to emotionally shut down. The plot was excellent and the characters were very well written. The claustrophobia and paranoia plays a really huge part in this novel making me feel really anxious and uneasy. If you enjoy psychological horror, I urge to read this one! It’s fast paced and truly horrifying. A huge thank you to the author for sending me this e-Arc of this novel. I very much enjoyed it and its probably one of my favorite short read of 2020.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Pearly Williams

    The Fear is a pandemic based story, hugely inspired by the Covid-19. I was inspired to read this book as it would be fitting for the current time that we are in. This book is on emotional horror and is centered around Jack and Ash who are quarantined together in a small apartment. Jack is afraid of the Cardigan man who turns out to be a fragment of her own imagination, who seems to be constantly haunting her thoughts. The descriptions in this book are expertly done and held my interest throughou The Fear is a pandemic based story, hugely inspired by the Covid-19. I was inspired to read this book as it would be fitting for the current time that we are in. This book is on emotional horror and is centered around Jack and Ash who are quarantined together in a small apartment. Jack is afraid of the Cardigan man who turns out to be a fragment of her own imagination, who seems to be constantly haunting her thoughts. The descriptions in this book are expertly done and held my interest throughout, although at some points I did struggle to keep up with the plot of the book. As the story develops, Jack becomes more deranged, putting Ash in a difficult spot. She is left to choose between protecting herself or her lover. Summary: Befitting of our time, story of two gay women, harassed and mentally ill. Dealing with issues surrounding the pandemic.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nichole Gray | gray_reader_89

    Reading this book while dealing with the real-world repercussions of an administration who did not take the pandemic seriously was very surreal. The beginning hit very close to home and then the story evolved into what could possibly happen if things didn’t improve. I liked the characters and the devolution into madness with no help available. There were some time related issues that bothered me and I’m not so sure about the ending - but overall this was very readable and a story that will stick Reading this book while dealing with the real-world repercussions of an administration who did not take the pandemic seriously was very surreal. The beginning hit very close to home and then the story evolved into what could possibly happen if things didn’t improve. I liked the characters and the devolution into madness with no help available. There were some time related issues that bothered me and I’m not so sure about the ending - but overall this was very readable and a story that will stick with me for quite a while.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Erin Falkenstien

    Character driven pandemic horror novel. This story masterfully weaves real life current events and the impact of those events on our mental health. Jack and Ash start of quarantine like most of us did, and the author does an incredible job at building the story from there. Pandemic Horror Novel, check. Weirdness bottled up, check. Couldn't put it down, check. Lost a little sleep over this story, double check.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Coco Carré

    Jacqueline (“Jack”) and Ashley move to Austin in order to start a new life together, away from their toxic families. But after Jack is attacked by a homophobe their first night in the city, she begins to see him everywhere, and Ashley is unable to tell if her wife's sightings of him are real or psychosomatic. Just as Jack is able to cope again, the coronavirus shutdown happens—and Ashley begins to see the attacker, too. The main strength of this book is that it gives a very frank, warts-and-all d Jacqueline (“Jack”) and Ashley move to Austin in order to start a new life together, away from their toxic families. But after Jack is attacked by a homophobe their first night in the city, she begins to see him everywhere, and Ashley is unable to tell if her wife's sightings of him are real or psychosomatic. Just as Jack is able to cope again, the coronavirus shutdown happens—and Ashley begins to see the attacker, too. The main strength of this book is that it gives a very frank, warts-and-all depiction of trauma. Jack’s severe response to being brutally attacked while defending her wife doesn’t depict her as a saint, and it’s only with gradual steps forward that she’s able to get slightly better. The amount of disassociating, trouble focusing on work, and difficulty relating to her wife is absolutely realistic to her condition. In her more lucid moments, she also is able to realize that her response is hard on her wife, and feels guilt for not being able to do more, which creates a downward spiral, borne out of fear that Ashley will leave her. These are all very familiar traps and patterns of someone suffering severe post-traumatic stress disorder, and Ashley’s side, which is also common but taboo to speak of, is also realistic. Ashley helps Jack selflessly but stretches herself to a breaking point in order to do so, while also enabling Jack’s illness – getting her concrete help isn’t brought up until far after it’s a possibility. The combination of factors here leads to a nightmare situation in their apartment. The psychological horror of the mental prison they find themselves in is compelling, and I finished the book in one sitting due to wanting to know how much worse it could get. As for weaknesses: I felt that the ending of the book was much stronger than the beginning – the pacing of the first few chapters is extremely slow, and the dialogue feels less genuine than it does by the end of the book. I think that, in trying to be sensitive and not fetishizing of a lesbian relationship, the author used phrases like “the hottest sex ever” to describe the two love scenes between Jack and Ashley, while later scenes are more graphic. It comes across as a little crass and borderline pornographic, and I think that a classic “fade to black” may have come across better. There are also quotations from the news and political figures at the beginning of each chapter, and a throwaway line that criticizes an American political figure. While I also find the people and situations referenced absolutely atrocious, I think that these took away from the message of the book. The racism, homophobia, paranoia, and the absurd 1984-like situation that caused Jack and Ashley’s difficulties in the first place to speak for themselves about the political situation in the United States with coronavirus. Many of the chapter introductions felt unnecessary and distracting, rather than adding value and context to the story. All in all, I felt this was a solid addition to the genre, as well as being interesting for its two sapphic lead characters and setting during the coronavirus pandemic. If not for its few issues, I would have rated it a 4.5, but there is solid talent on display within this work. I would recommend horror fans who like a bleak, claustrophobic feeling to their books, or especially those who like body horror, to give it a try, and I would gladly read subsequent works from Spencer Hamilton. Content warnings: gore, trauma, sexual assault, physical abuse, homophobia, racism.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Maria Park

    A Horror Story for 2020 There were some things I liked about The Fear. It was refreshing to read a mainstream novel centered upon a Lesbian couple that didn't just focus on sex. I also thought using the very real emotions evoked by the COVID-19 pandemic to build the development of a horror story was a great idea. The author handles Mental Health issues well, supported by factual situations. Even going so far as to encourage anyone dealing with these issues to get help in the acknowledgements. Apart A Horror Story for 2020 There were some things I liked about The Fear. It was refreshing to read a mainstream novel centered upon a Lesbian couple that didn't just focus on sex. I also thought using the very real emotions evoked by the COVID-19 pandemic to build the development of a horror story was a great idea. The author handles Mental Health issues well, supported by factual situations. Even going so far as to encourage anyone dealing with these issues to get help in the acknowledgements. Apart from these points, I felt the rest of the book was filled with too much gratuitous violence, filthy language and unnecessary sexual content. I enjoy suspenseful horror stories and bemoan the trend of the last 20 years towards slash and blood plots. Still, a fairly good read if you like this type of content.

  30. 4 out of 5

    The Horror Hypothesis

    When I sat down and opened THE FEAR for the first time, I was prepared for a conventional pandemic horror novel. Well, THE FEAR is not that. Hamilton's novel is a wicked psychological thriller with elements of body horror and it uses the pandemic as a metaphor for mental illness. It's obviously timely, but I am convinced THE FEAR crawled right out of the Dell Abyss funhole. It has that vibe to it. For me, sequences of it were very hard to read. I really struggled with anxiety back in March and c When I sat down and opened THE FEAR for the first time, I was prepared for a conventional pandemic horror novel. Well, THE FEAR is not that. Hamilton's novel is a wicked psychological thriller with elements of body horror and it uses the pandemic as a metaphor for mental illness. It's obviously timely, but I am convinced THE FEAR crawled right out of the Dell Abyss funhole. It has that vibe to it. For me, sequences of it were very hard to read. I really struggled with anxiety back in March and continue to battle feelings of hopelessness and despair months later. However, I take solace in perspectives like this. It was cathartic to read Jack and Ash's story. 4 stars.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.