counter create hit While Six Million Died: A Chronicle of American Apathy - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

While Six Million Died: A Chronicle of American Apathy

Availability: Ready to download

First published in 1967, 'While Six Million Died' revealed the untold story behind the deliberate obstruction placed in the way of attempts to save the Jewish people from Hitler's "Final Solution, " with detailed documentation from worldwide interviews with participants, research in archives around the world, as well a classified and official papers that had never been First published in 1967, 'While Six Million Died' revealed the untold story behind the deliberate obstruction placed in the way of attempts to save the Jewish people from Hitler's "Final Solution, " with detailed documentation from worldwide interviews with participants, research in archives around the world, as well a classified and official papers that had never been published before Morse's exhaustive study. While the tragedy of the Holocaust continues to be told by historians, novelists, filmmakers, and others, no single volume has documented this dark period in its historical relationship to America as thoroughly and passionately as Arthur Morse's pioneering work.


Compare
Ads Banner

First published in 1967, 'While Six Million Died' revealed the untold story behind the deliberate obstruction placed in the way of attempts to save the Jewish people from Hitler's "Final Solution, " with detailed documentation from worldwide interviews with participants, research in archives around the world, as well a classified and official papers that had never been First published in 1967, 'While Six Million Died' revealed the untold story behind the deliberate obstruction placed in the way of attempts to save the Jewish people from Hitler's "Final Solution, " with detailed documentation from worldwide interviews with participants, research in archives around the world, as well a classified and official papers that had never been published before Morse's exhaustive study. While the tragedy of the Holocaust continues to be told by historians, novelists, filmmakers, and others, no single volume has documented this dark period in its historical relationship to America as thoroughly and passionately as Arthur Morse's pioneering work.

30 review for While Six Million Died: A Chronicle of American Apathy

  1. 5 out of 5

    Erroll Treslan

    A dispiriting but well researched description of the Allies' complicity in the Nazi's discrimination against the Jews and others. Morse provides an undisputed historical record that the lives of at least hundreds of thousands who perished in concentration camps could have been saved. The banality of evil described by Hannah Arendt was not confined to within German borders.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Erin Miller

    This is such a tough book to read because you desperately want the U.S. and the European countries to do the right thing, but you know exactly how it turns out; the chapter on the S.S. St. Louis is probably the most painful example of this, and one of the most embarrassing moments in United States history. It's a great book. It answers the question that so many people ask about the Holocaust - "Why didn't the Jews just leave?" - with the horrible reality of, "They tried, but no one would take This is such a tough book to read because you desperately want the U.S. and the European countries to do the right thing, but you know exactly how it turns out; the chapter on the S.S. St. Louis is probably the most painful example of this, and one of the most embarrassing moments in United States history. It's a great book. It answers the question that so many people ask about the Holocaust - "Why didn't the Jews just leave?" - with the horrible reality of, "They tried, but no one would take them."

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chandra Boulden

    Awe man! What a sad depressing time in our history. SO meany things we could have done differently, if nothing else- let the immigrants come! I don't understand why in a time of such turmoil for the Jewish people they were not helped more, especially when they were sponsored or on ships at our ports! The last 2 chapters shined a little light on some of the good that was done then. However, it's good to know the history so we can change our future not hide it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    James

    Probably one of the best books I've read. And necessary to understand why FDR was no friend of the Jews. In February 1973 I borrowed the book from our synagogue's library. I was 15 at the time, and so spellbound that I engineered my bedroom windows so my mother, coming home from a date with my eventual stepfather, couldn't see the lights on in my room from the road. The book takes us from Hitler's early anti-Jewish policies to the Nuremberg Laws, to Kristallnacht, to the voyage of the St. Louis Probably one of the best books I've read. And necessary to understand why FDR was no friend of the Jews. In February 1973 I borrowed the book from our synagogue's library. I was 15 at the time, and so spellbound that I engineered my bedroom windows so my mother, coming home from a date with my eventual stepfather, couldn't see the lights on in my room from the road. The book takes us from Hitler's early anti-Jewish policies to the Nuremberg Laws, to Kristallnacht, to the voyage of the St. Louis and the establishment of death camps. In the face of this impending slaughter, the U.S., Canada and to a lesser extent Britain actively prevented Jewish arrivals in safe countries. During the war, FDR arranged matters so that he could maintain "deniability." Overall, an entrancing book that shook my roots as a budding young Democrat to the core. I was reading another review of The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York by Robert A. Caro. She states in part: Midway through adolescence, I began wondering a bit which life event would finally make me feel like an adult. Of course I had the usual teenaged hypotheses, and acted accordingly to test some of them out. Getting drunk? Having sex? Driving a car? Going to college? None of these things did make me feel grownup; in many instances, their effect was the opposite. *************For the past few years I’ve had the sense of wearing an oversized grownup life that wasn’t actually mine, while that magical rite of passage into adulthood continued to elude me. Maybe when I have children things will click into place, I’ve mused, listening to Talking Heads with one ear and sort of doubting it.... Part of this might be generational; if thirty is the new twenty, it’s no wonder that I get that Lost Boys feeling, and shrug confusedly when overnight company makes fun of my teddy bear. I’m pleased to announce that thanks to the glory of Robert Caro, this stage is basically behind me. Having finally finished The Power Broker, I feel much more like a grownup, and believe it or not, I’m pretty into that. *********** But reading this book made me feel like a grownup because it helped me to understand the way the world works as I never had before. In a similar sense, this book really made Judaism a central part of who I am.

  5. 5 out of 5

    carl theaker

    Interesting look at all that could have been done to obstruct the holocaust. Lots of facts and stories that come in handy for debates in showing the world in general had their misgivings about taking in the Jews, which in turn provided perfect propaganda for the Germans. However you can see many items are a question of slanting, eg FDR had war priorities, do you divert resources to say bomb death camp ovens and provide short term relief, or prosecute the war and end it all?

  6. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    Excellent book. Painted an objective and maddening picture of the apathy of American bureaucrats who couldn't figure out how save millions of lives despite the solutions and power they possessed. Effectively dispels the myth that America didn't have a clear sense of what was happening in Europe during the war.

  7. 5 out of 5

    GONZA

    I read the Italian version of this book, that tells the universal indifference of a whole planet towards a genocide. Nothing can me more actual than that. Ho letto la versione italiana di un libro che racconta l'indifferenza di un intero pianeta (tranne rari casi) ad un genocidio. Niente di più attuale.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    much too heavy to read now that i've already spent concentrated time in the concentrations camps and the Third Reich. may revisit at a later date. gut wrenching and frustrating. the wheels of justice grind SOOOOOOOOO slowly.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Vincent

    Relevant now more than ever.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Deena

    Some of Morse's facts have been proven wrong since this was first published in 1968, but it is still a masterpiece.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Hope

    Scary how much procrastination took place. They all knew! Evil. Pure Evil. America, England, the Vatican, all guilty by association

  12. 5 out of 5

    Johnny

    A very good and poignant book about the failures of the UK and American governments to stop the Holocaust. The book goes into detail about what each country knew and when.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Charissa

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amy Achata

  15. 4 out of 5

    Linda

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rumell Khan

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bob Mulcahy

  19. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  20. 5 out of 5

    Pbarlow

  21. 4 out of 5

    CSteen

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dean

  23. 5 out of 5

    John

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ben Newport-Foster

  26. 4 out of 5

    Denzel

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

  28. 5 out of 5

    Michael Gottlieb

  29. 4 out of 5

    M

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mpm

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.