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An inspiring true story of hope and survival, this is the testimony of a boy who was imprisoned in Auschwitz, Gross-Rosen and Buchenwald and recorded his experiences through words and color drawings. In June 1943, after long years of hardship and persecution, thirteen-year-old Thomas Geve and his mother were deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau. Separated upon arrival, he was lef An inspiring true story of hope and survival, this is the testimony of a boy who was imprisoned in Auschwitz, Gross-Rosen and Buchenwald and recorded his experiences through words and color drawings. In June 1943, after long years of hardship and persecution, thirteen-year-old Thomas Geve and his mother were deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau. Separated upon arrival, he was left to fend for himself in the men’s camp of Auschwitz I. During 22 harsh months in three camps, Thomas experienced and witnessed the cruel and inhumane world of Nazi concentration and death camps. Nonetheless, he never gave up the will to live. Miraculously, he survived and was liberated from Buchenwald at the age of fifteen. While still in the camp and too weak to leave, Thomas felt a compelling need to document it all, and drew over eighty drawings, all portrayed in simple yet poignant detail with extraordinary accuracy. He not only shared the infamous scenes, but also the day-to-day events of life in the camps, alongside inmates' manifestations of humanity, support and friendship. To honor his lost friends and the millions of silenced victims of the Holocaust, in the years following the war, Thomas put his story into words. Despite the evil of the camps, his account provides a striking affirmation of life. The Boy Who Drew Auschwitz, accompanied with 56 of his color illustrations, is the unique testimony of young Thomas and his quest for a brighter tomorrow.


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An inspiring true story of hope and survival, this is the testimony of a boy who was imprisoned in Auschwitz, Gross-Rosen and Buchenwald and recorded his experiences through words and color drawings. In June 1943, after long years of hardship and persecution, thirteen-year-old Thomas Geve and his mother were deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau. Separated upon arrival, he was lef An inspiring true story of hope and survival, this is the testimony of a boy who was imprisoned in Auschwitz, Gross-Rosen and Buchenwald and recorded his experiences through words and color drawings. In June 1943, after long years of hardship and persecution, thirteen-year-old Thomas Geve and his mother were deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau. Separated upon arrival, he was left to fend for himself in the men’s camp of Auschwitz I. During 22 harsh months in three camps, Thomas experienced and witnessed the cruel and inhumane world of Nazi concentration and death camps. Nonetheless, he never gave up the will to live. Miraculously, he survived and was liberated from Buchenwald at the age of fifteen. While still in the camp and too weak to leave, Thomas felt a compelling need to document it all, and drew over eighty drawings, all portrayed in simple yet poignant detail with extraordinary accuracy. He not only shared the infamous scenes, but also the day-to-day events of life in the camps, alongside inmates' manifestations of humanity, support and friendship. To honor his lost friends and the millions of silenced victims of the Holocaust, in the years following the war, Thomas put his story into words. Despite the evil of the camps, his account provides a striking affirmation of life. The Boy Who Drew Auschwitz, accompanied with 56 of his color illustrations, is the unique testimony of young Thomas and his quest for a brighter tomorrow.

30 review for The Boy Who Drew Auschwitz: A Powerful True Story of Hope and Survival

  1. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn

    The Boy Who Drew Auschwitz by Thomas Geve was Thomas’s heart wrenching and emotional account of his time he spent in three different concentration camps during the Holocaust. Thomas was a young twelve year old boy when he was transported to the first of the three camps he would be in. One of the camps Thomas and his mother found themselves in was Auschwitz. He arrived with his mother but the two were immediately separated. He spent a total of twenty-two months of his young life in concentration The Boy Who Drew Auschwitz by Thomas Geve was Thomas’s heart wrenching and emotional account of his time he spent in three different concentration camps during the Holocaust. Thomas was a young twelve year old boy when he was transported to the first of the three camps he would be in. One of the camps Thomas and his mother found themselves in was Auschwitz. He arrived with his mother but the two were immediately separated. He spent a total of twenty-two months of his young life in concentration camps. Thomas shared his own horrific story both in prose and in pictures. His original sketches and drawings had been lost. Upon liberation, Thomas recreated his drawings from memory. He sketched them first with pencil and then added color from the water color paints he was given by his American liberators. His paintings and sketches were displayed at Yad Vashem and remain there even today. Many survivors of the Holocaust were hesitant to share their stories and deepest memories. For some it was just too painful to remember. Others felt guilty that they survived and millions did not. Thomas was determined to tell what he had seen, experienced and lived through. He had written two previous books before Charlie Inglefield helped Thomas retell his story in a more modern version. The Boy Who Drew Auschwitz was the combined result. The newer version retained all the facts but was updated in language. The Boy Who Drew Auschwitz was a unique account of the Holocaust because it was told from the perspective of an almost teenage boy. Thomas described his friends he made and lost, the meager food rations he was given, the places he lived and their conditions and the jobs he was assigned to at each camp. Thomas tried to find some good in those he came in contact with. The simple and kind remarks that came his way, often few and far between, helped give Thomas the will and desire to live and survive. To this day, Thomas speaks to audiences around the world about the Holocaust. He lives in Israel. Thomas lost his mother in the Holocaust but was reunited with his father who had managed to get to England before World War II began. I listened to the audiobook of The Boy Who Drew Auschwitz by Thomas Geve and Charlie Inglefield. It was brilliantly narrated by Mark Meadows. He was really able to capture the emotions, sufferings, despair and hope in his reading of this book. I highly recommend this book. Thank you to Harper Audio for allowing me to listen to this advanced copy through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed in this review are completely my own. This book is set to be published 7/27/2021.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Christensen

    A heart wrenching account of Thomas Geves’ teenage years in Auschwitz and other neighboring barbarian concentration camps, during the Second World War. This book captures Thomas’ daily life and all the pain and suffering he endured, without ever feeling sorry for himself nor ever giving up. Thomas attention to detail, his drawings and his matter of fact way of telling the truth about the atrocities of concentration camps, has given me a far deeper understanding and empathy. This is humanity at i A heart wrenching account of Thomas Geves’ teenage years in Auschwitz and other neighboring barbarian concentration camps, during the Second World War. This book captures Thomas’ daily life and all the pain and suffering he endured, without ever feeling sorry for himself nor ever giving up. Thomas attention to detail, his drawings and his matter of fact way of telling the truth about the atrocities of concentration camps, has given me a far deeper understanding and empathy. This is humanity at its worst and at its best. Friendship, bravery and a few simple acts of kindness can make the difference between life and death. A must read for everyone. It is a part of history that should be told and never repeated.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Shiloah

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I couldn’t put this book down. What a story! I have a deep interest in Holocaust stories, especially after living in Germany for 9 years, and growing up with stories like the Sound of Music and the book the Hiding Place. The tragic stories mixed with finding courage to go on against brutality and inhumane treatment still astounds me. When my dad took us to see one of the concentration camps, we also noticed the prevailing dark cloud that hung over the area day and night. This book is about a youn I couldn’t put this book down. What a story! I have a deep interest in Holocaust stories, especially after living in Germany for 9 years, and growing up with stories like the Sound of Music and the book the Hiding Place. The tragic stories mixed with finding courage to go on against brutality and inhumane treatment still astounds me. When my dad took us to see one of the concentration camps, we also noticed the prevailing dark cloud that hung over the area day and night. This book is about a young boy who spends several years in three different concentration camps. His tenacity shines through the whole experience. He had to grow up far too quickly and yet he kept his mind on the future. I love that he became an architect after the war, building Jerusalem in a tangible way. He went to live in Jerusalem. I find it interesting that he felt more connected to his Jewish story and ancestors than ever after his experiences. For the gentle reader: He is open and honest about his experiences without being graphic. However, he had to ward off multiple homosexual advances and avoid being sexually molested.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    An incredibly intriguing and detailed book about Geve's experience, survival, and luck in three concentration camps. The drawings add a powerful extra layer to his story and make you get a better grasp of the horrors that he endured. This makes the book unique and a read that I will not forget. An incredibly intriguing and detailed book about Geve's experience, survival, and luck in three concentration camps. The drawings add a powerful extra layer to his story and make you get a better grasp of the horrors that he endured. This makes the book unique and a read that I will not forget.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jenna

    A devastatingly beautiful read. Thomas Geve brings to life the abhorrent conditions he was forced to endure, like so many others. His story is testament to the horror of human depravity and such an important read for all.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tally

    The Boy Who Drew Auschwitz is the first book I have read by the author. This book follows a young lad as he ages through his teenage years being Jewish in wartime Germany. The story progresses from the rise of Hitler’s powers to the various ways Jewish people would avoid capture, and the activities and jobs they were still aloud to complete during the early years of war. Further into the story the author explains life for people living in multiple concretion camps, including as the name suggests The Boy Who Drew Auschwitz is the first book I have read by the author. This book follows a young lad as he ages through his teenage years being Jewish in wartime Germany. The story progresses from the rise of Hitler’s powers to the various ways Jewish people would avoid capture, and the activities and jobs they were still aloud to complete during the early years of war. Further into the story the author explains life for people living in multiple concretion camps, including as the name suggests Auschwitz. This element of the book was most intriguing as it covered not just Jewish prisoners, but other nationality and religions along with insights and the workings of multiple institutions during this time.  The book is honestly the best biography style books, along with one of the greatest war-time books, I’ve read. This is one of the most binge worthy books I’ve read in months! It was easy to follow and captured heavy topics without being to much of a harsh read while continuing to remain respectable to those lost. It allows the reader to embark on a discovery of sections of the holocaust and concentration camps from a firsthand view. I personally learnt allot more from this one book than I did in all my modern history lessons taken in school. I would 100% recommend to anyone interested in this period of history. I look forward to reading more from this author in the future.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Thomas was thirteen years old when he and his mother were sent to Auschwitz. They were separated. Thomas during World War II was imprisoned in Birkenau, Auschwitz, Gross Rosen, and Buchenwald. How he survived life in these camps is told with details and drawings he drew on post cards.Thomas would suffer horrible brutality from the Nazis yet somehow survived. He witnessed mass murder of inmates and newly arrived prisoners. He celebrated his freedom from the Nazis when he was 16 years old. He took Thomas was thirteen years old when he and his mother were sent to Auschwitz. They were separated. Thomas during World War II was imprisoned in Birkenau, Auschwitz, Gross Rosen, and Buchenwald. How he survived life in these camps is told with details and drawings he drew on post cards.Thomas would suffer horrible brutality from the Nazis yet somehow survived. He witnessed mass murder of inmates and newly arrived prisoners. He celebrated his freedom from the Nazis when he was 16 years old. He took the opportunity to go to Switzerland to grow strong and healthy. He did get to see his father again in England. In spite of the difficult life in the camps, there were moments of kindness that would give him hope. He miraculously found the will to live. This book is a true story of a boy’s life living in the death camps of the Nazis. It is a story that tells the daily life of prisoners living. It’s not easy to think that human beings were allowed and encouraged to be nasty, brutal, cruel to other humans. It was the worse type of discrimination. It was about the inferiority of men who thought themselves superior. It is a book that should be read in every country and in every language. It is excellent. I will never forget it. Disclaimer: I received an arc of this book from the author/publisher from Netgalley. I wasn’t obligated to write a favorable review or any review at all. The opinions expressed are strictly my own.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Hippiejo

    I am always incredibly moved by any historical accounts of what happened at Auschwitz but this book hurt my heart. I think the visuals drawn by Thomas Geve are some of the most profound I've seen and that they are the drawings of a child is devastating. The images in the movie Schindlers list of the confiscated personal belongings were forefront in my mind when reading Thomas Geve's account of people being stripped of absolutely everything they posessed including their identities and it's soul de I am always incredibly moved by any historical accounts of what happened at Auschwitz but this book hurt my heart. I think the visuals drawn by Thomas Geve are some of the most profound I've seen and that they are the drawings of a child is devastating. The images in the movie Schindlers list of the confiscated personal belongings were forefront in my mind when reading Thomas Geve's account of people being stripped of absolutely everything they posessed including their identities and it's soul destroying. Most of the time, the whole transport would go straight to it's death, like cattle to the slaughter. We would see them come in. Then their journey's end would announce itself with a dark, creeping smoke, slowly rising above the western horizon from the crematoria of Birkenau. ........ this broke me! Thomas Geve presents us with a visually vivid description of the horrors that took place in the Auschwitz concentration camps and if ever we needed reminders of just how wicked man can be, they lie within the pages of this book. But the book also reminds us of bravery, courage, resourcefulness and determination to survive against all the odds. This can just never happen again. 😢

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lily-Ella Bright

    The boy who drew auschwitz is the best book I have read. It is hard to even put into words how incredible this book is! Utterly heartbreaking, thought provoking, eye opening and yet optimistic and inspiring. Thomas’ book offers such an intimate and raw insight into the harrowing reality of life amongst multiple concentration camps. The colourful, childlike drawings of such a young boy poses a stark reminder of the young and innocent having their universal childhood experiences snatched away from The boy who drew auschwitz is the best book I have read. It is hard to even put into words how incredible this book is! Utterly heartbreaking, thought provoking, eye opening and yet optimistic and inspiring. Thomas’ book offers such an intimate and raw insight into the harrowing reality of life amongst multiple concentration camps. The colourful, childlike drawings of such a young boy poses a stark reminder of the young and innocent having their universal childhood experiences snatched away from them, swapped for the brutal, inhumane lives enforced within the camps. It is vital that Thomas’ and each and every Holocaust experiences are shared and passed down to following generations, ensuring the harrowing truth is forever told. Despite the understandably haunting memories many faced and longed to forget, Thomas’ resilience and determination to share his anecdote through his art and later words, provide a priceless source of historical evidence and information to educate and inform - I feel privileged and grateful to have been able to read such a personal first hand account. Thankyou

  10. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

    The Boy Who Drew Auschwitz By: Thomas Geve and Narrated by: Mark Meadows is a powerful True Story of Hope and Survival This audiobook had me hooked and you will need tissues. This book/audiobook is an account of a brave young lad called Thomas who was twelve years old and his mother spent his time in three different concentration camps during the Holocaust and one of the camps was Auschwitz, however they were immediately separated from each other. Somehow with every everything that is going on a The Boy Who Drew Auschwitz By: Thomas Geve and Narrated by: Mark Meadows is a powerful True Story of Hope and Survival This audiobook had me hooked and you will need tissues. This book/audiobook is an account of a brave young lad called Thomas who was twelve years old and his mother spent his time in three different concentration camps during the Holocaust and one of the camps was Auschwitz, however they were immediately separated from each other. Somehow with every everything that is going on around Thomas he manages to keep hope in his heart, that one day he will see his mother again and they will be free. This is a well written story of a deep and courageous man.and an account of life in hell where creative solutions kept this young boy alive .... The narrator Mark Meadows was excellent. I highly recommend this book. Big thank-you to NetGalley and Harper Collins and Harper Audio for sending me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Review left on amazon Audio, Amazon UK and Goodreads.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    The amount of detail within this book is incredible, following the Journey from living comfortably with his family, through three concentration camps and finally his liberation to freedom. There is so much insight into the life inside the concentration camps for a young boy, and the friendships and interactions with others. While this book describes a most inhumane and atrocious period of our history, it gives the opportunity to see how those who experienced it saw it. This book is well written, The amount of detail within this book is incredible, following the Journey from living comfortably with his family, through three concentration camps and finally his liberation to freedom. There is so much insight into the life inside the concentration camps for a young boy, and the friendships and interactions with others. While this book describes a most inhumane and atrocious period of our history, it gives the opportunity to see how those who experienced it saw it. This book is well written, and I was thoroughly invested in Geve's story from the start. The pace is consistent throughout, and the voice of the author is well established and strong. In addition to this beautiful story, Geve's drawings made whilst still in one of the concentration camps are available to be viewed. These drawings are detailed and moving, and contribute to the book wonderfully. I would like to thank NetGalley and Harper Collins for sending me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Howard

    I listened to the audiobook version of this real life story of 13 year old Thomas, which was well narrated by Mark Meadows. Thomas' life was devastated when he and his mother were incarcerated into a concentration camp and nearly immediately separated. Thomas went on to spend nearly 2 years in three different concentration camps, including Auschwitz. This is a story of hardship, brutality, endurance, friendship and many other emotions as told from the memories of Thomas. An incredibly important I listened to the audiobook version of this real life story of 13 year old Thomas, which was well narrated by Mark Meadows. Thomas' life was devastated when he and his mother were incarcerated into a concentration camp and nearly immediately separated. Thomas went on to spend nearly 2 years in three different concentration camps, including Auschwitz. This is a story of hardship, brutality, endurance, friendship and many other emotions as told from the memories of Thomas. An incredibly important read, which tells how things really were in these concentration camps - and how diabolically some humans are able to treat others. The prisoners existences were, overall, horrendous and, if they survived, they would go on to suffer a lifetime of nightmares. Highly recommended. Many thanks to Netgalley and Harper Collins UK for my copy.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Scarcella

    The Boy who Drew Auschwitz, by Thomas Geve and Charlie Inglefield wrote the book on a true story book. Thomas, himself tells his story through his eyes of when he was 13 years old, who he farewell his father when he went to England to help with the allies. He and his mother were arrested and deported in 1943 and both were separated, then he received last note from his mother. He had to observe his story of barbarity, hope, and survival through three concentration camps. He remembered every detai The Boy who Drew Auschwitz, by Thomas Geve and Charlie Inglefield wrote the book on a true story book. Thomas, himself tells his story through his eyes of when he was 13 years old, who he farewell his father when he went to England to help with the allies. He and his mother were arrested and deported in 1943 and both were separated, then he received last note from his mother. He had to observe his story of barbarity, hope, and survival through three concentration camps. He remembered every detail around him and choose to tell in his own words and dozens of his own colour drawings. I’ve enjoyed the book because it keeps you interested and the drawings makes you feel as if you are seeing exactly what the author lived through. The drawings is a perfect example to teach young kids and use drawings to show through his eyes.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Skip

    A particularly compelling memoir, documenting a very dark period for humanity, along with colored pencil sketches, from a survivor of Auschwitz (and two other concentration camps.) Writing as Thomas Geve, after his father moved to England, he and his mother moved to Berlin to live with relatives and were sent to Auschwitz, where they were immediately separated. Despite inordinate hardships, including work, malnutrition, disease, and cold, 12-year old Thomas managed to survive until liberation, b A particularly compelling memoir, documenting a very dark period for humanity, along with colored pencil sketches, from a survivor of Auschwitz (and two other concentration camps.) Writing as Thomas Geve, after his father moved to England, he and his mother moved to Berlin to live with relatives and were sent to Auschwitz, where they were immediately separated. Despite inordinate hardships, including work, malnutrition, disease, and cold, 12-year old Thomas managed to survive until liberation, based on his instincts, a few kindnesses of other prisoners and occasionally guards or doctors. He made friends despite language, cultural and economic barriers, and once liberated, spent months recuperating in Switzerland, where he sketched his memories. His indomitable spirit overshadows the horrors he overcame unlike millions of others who died in Nazi concentration camps.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    I’m not sure it’s ever appropriate or even possible to give feedback on a book that is based on such a real life and dark experience that we never wish to ever revisit. I’m so deeply saddened every single time I read a book from Auschwitz survivors and I always feel like they have been robbed of so much of their lives, not just the time that they endured in camp but the memories that stay with them for a lifetime afterwards. I am so wholeheartedly grateful for these men and women, I can only hope I’m not sure it’s ever appropriate or even possible to give feedback on a book that is based on such a real life and dark experience that we never wish to ever revisit. I’m so deeply saddened every single time I read a book from Auschwitz survivors and I always feel like they have been robbed of so much of their lives, not just the time that they endured in camp but the memories that stay with them for a lifetime afterwards. I am so wholeheartedly grateful for these men and women, I can only hope and prayer that after this ordeal was over and they approached freedom that their lives were filled with love and joy. I really am in awe of them, their strength and courage is inspiring and just so overwhelming.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kristine

    Thomas Geve was only 13 when he was pulled from his home into the work and concentration camps along with his mother. The story shares intimate details of the horrors of the camps, the pieces of himself that he lost as he could only think of survival, and his friendships that brought him a sliver of joy in a situation full of death and despair. He shares his drawings, simple black lines filled in with watercolors on notecards. They are the drawings of a child. A child who was pushed into these h Thomas Geve was only 13 when he was pulled from his home into the work and concentration camps along with his mother. The story shares intimate details of the horrors of the camps, the pieces of himself that he lost as he could only think of survival, and his friendships that brought him a sliver of joy in a situation full of death and despair. He shares his drawings, simple black lines filled in with watercolors on notecards. They are the drawings of a child. A child who was pushed into these horrors and forced to see true hatred. If we forget, history will repeat itself. The book's pace is consistent throughout the entire book. It is well written. The pacing of the art throughout the memoir is appropriate. Thank you to NetGalley and Harper for the ARC.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Catherine

    Thomas Geve lived in Berlin with his mother. Working as a gravedigger. As a teenager he was taken to Auschwitz with his mum. She died there. He survived and after liberation he recorded what camp life was like in drawings. This is what we need to preserve. A survivor memories of what actually happened. So many stories, all so different but all equally important in documenting history for future generations. The narrator was easy to listern to but I did expect a reader with an accent to bring the Thomas Geve lived in Berlin with his mother. Working as a gravedigger. As a teenager he was taken to Auschwitz with his mum. She died there. He survived and after liberation he recorded what camp life was like in drawings. This is what we need to preserve. A survivor memories of what actually happened. So many stories, all so different but all equally important in documenting history for future generations. The narrator was easy to listern to but I did expect a reader with an accent to bring the story more to life. Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley for the opportunity to listern to this book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    This book is a valuable piece of history. My only hope is this book does not get lost in the oversaturation of books that use "Auschwitz" in the title. It is clear we are in a fad period of books about the Holocaust, and Auschwitz specifically, but this is one of the gems that should be lifted above the others. The illustrations are so obviously drawn by a child that it becomes even more painful of a depiction. Everyone knows what happened and the horrors people were subjected to but having some This book is a valuable piece of history. My only hope is this book does not get lost in the oversaturation of books that use "Auschwitz" in the title. It is clear we are in a fad period of books about the Holocaust, and Auschwitz specifically, but this is one of the gems that should be lifted above the others. The illustrations are so obviously drawn by a child that it becomes even more painful of a depiction. Everyone knows what happened and the horrors people were subjected to but having something so innocent as a child's drawings depicting some of the worst atrocities our world has known is so powerful a storytelling device it is impossible to ignore.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    I have read many, many accounts of life and death in Nazi concentration camps. This one stands out because the account and accompanying drawings were written and drawn shortly after Thomas Geve was liberated so they are probably more accurate than later accounts. Also--since Geve was only 14 when he was shipped to his first concentration camp, he has a different point of view than other adult survivors. His youth gave him a more optimistic attitude toward the future and he worked very hard to ge I have read many, many accounts of life and death in Nazi concentration camps. This one stands out because the account and accompanying drawings were written and drawn shortly after Thomas Geve was liberated so they are probably more accurate than later accounts. Also--since Geve was only 14 when he was shipped to his first concentration camp, he has a different point of view than other adult survivors. His youth gave him a more optimistic attitude toward the future and he worked very hard to get to know and support his fellow inmates. Despite its horrific contents, this book delivers hope and inspiration.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bookwormbadger

    Many thanks to Netgalley, Harpercollins UK Audio and Thomas Geve for this audiobook. This book was brilliantly narrated by Mark Meadows who really captured the emotive nature of the story. There have been many Auschwitz memoirs in recent years and this is another great addition to the genre, with its unique teenager perspective, as Thomas was 13 when he was taken to Auschwitz. Very touching and memorable, however I would have liked to have learned more about the drawings... perhaps they weren't Many thanks to Netgalley, Harpercollins UK Audio and Thomas Geve for this audiobook. This book was brilliantly narrated by Mark Meadows who really captured the emotive nature of the story. There have been many Auschwitz memoirs in recent years and this is another great addition to the genre, with its unique teenager perspective, as Thomas was 13 when he was taken to Auschwitz. Very touching and memorable, however I would have liked to have learned more about the drawings... perhaps they weren't referred to because of this being an audiobook?

  21. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra

    The stories of Holocaust survivors are always so heartbreaking yet inspiring. The atrocities that these individuals went through are unthinkable in today’s age but happened not all that long ago. This story keeps you interested and the drawings make you feel as if you are seeing exactly what the author lived through. The drawings would be a great way to teach the Holocaust to younger kids and use the drawings to show “through his eyes.”

  22. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    This was a different accounting of the Holocaust as it was originally put together by a 13-15 year old boy, Thomas Geve, when he was in Auschwicz. He drew pictures of daily life, but these were lost. So, immediately after being freed, he drew the pictures again from memory and several years later wrote this accounting in 1958. I was impressed with his hope and positivity even when it seemed there was no hope or anything to feel good about. He dreamed of building up and creating.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Smith

    Seeing the concentration camp life through Thomas’s eyes and his drawings was heart wrenching yet also eye opening. I haven’t read many first hand accounts from children’s experiences in concentration camps. I am grateful to Goodreads for selecting me as a winner to get a copy of this book and read it. Anyone interested in the Holocaust needs to read this book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Elisabeth

    Another viewpoint about the nazi invasion and Auschwitz by a boy who grew into a man and documented his memories in pictures. Unfortunately the website quoted in the audiobook has been taken down by now so unable to see the drawings. Delivered a gruesome image nonetheless by descriptions.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jorgen

    Very painful but important read. Very detailed but not over dramatic. Because it's written in a factual matter it becomes even more painful. However, the hardwarming moments in the camp are inspiring to read. Very painful but important read. Very detailed but not over dramatic. Because it's written in a factual matter it becomes even more painful. However, the hardwarming moments in the camp are inspiring to read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Piper Winchester

    Different experience through words and drawings. Haunting and interesting

  27. 4 out of 5

    Luke

    This was heart breaking, beautiful and such an important read. Cannot recommend enough

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    A superb, moving and illumniating read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Fiona R

    Did not finish

  30. 4 out of 5

    Braekeveldt

    The Holocaust story through the drawings and eyes of a young boy who survived 3 concentration camps ....and not the easiest ones. Interesting reading and supported by the drawings of 1945.

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