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A remarkable turnaround by a leader with a remarkable philosophy: Find your noble purpose. Put people at the center. Unleash human magic. "It was Fall in Minnesota. It was getting cold and we were supposed to die." This is how Hubert Joly describes the early, dark days as CEO of Best Buy, a job most thought he was crazy to accept. Amazon was tearing a disruptive path throug A remarkable turnaround by a leader with a remarkable philosophy: Find your noble purpose. Put people at the center. Unleash human magic. "It was Fall in Minnesota. It was getting cold and we were supposed to die." This is how Hubert Joly describes the early, dark days as CEO of Best Buy, a job most thought he was crazy to accept. Amazon was tearing a disruptive path through retail, but in the face of that existential threat Joly did something remarkable: he saved Best Buy and remade it into a thriving company rated as one of the most desirable businesses to work for. Having recently stepped down as Chairman and CEO, Joly is ready to share the leadership principles that underpinned the resurgence of Best Buy and that he believes are at the heart of business: pursue a noble purpose, put people at the center, unleash human magic, and treat profit as an outcome. There was a time when many would call this a soft philosophy. But times are changing. Best Buy and 180 other companies signed the momentous Business Roundtable statement in support of stakeholder capitalism. The Covid-19 pandemic further pushed many businesses to lead from a place of purpose and with humanity. The changes underway are not a revolt, but a revolution. And Joly provides concrete advice on how to implement principles that can serve as beacons for the next era of capitalism. Joly himself was transformed from a hard-charging, deeply analytical McKinsey consultant to a leader who believes in what he calls human magic. He will share how so much of what he initially learned about management is either dated, incomplete, or simply wrong—including how to turn around a business, develop and implement a strategy, mobilize an organization, and what it takes to be a great leader. The leadership principles Joly lays out worked at Best Buy. They can also contribute to the necessary re-foundation of business and capitalism around purpose and humanity.


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A remarkable turnaround by a leader with a remarkable philosophy: Find your noble purpose. Put people at the center. Unleash human magic. "It was Fall in Minnesota. It was getting cold and we were supposed to die." This is how Hubert Joly describes the early, dark days as CEO of Best Buy, a job most thought he was crazy to accept. Amazon was tearing a disruptive path throug A remarkable turnaround by a leader with a remarkable philosophy: Find your noble purpose. Put people at the center. Unleash human magic. "It was Fall in Minnesota. It was getting cold and we were supposed to die." This is how Hubert Joly describes the early, dark days as CEO of Best Buy, a job most thought he was crazy to accept. Amazon was tearing a disruptive path through retail, but in the face of that existential threat Joly did something remarkable: he saved Best Buy and remade it into a thriving company rated as one of the most desirable businesses to work for. Having recently stepped down as Chairman and CEO, Joly is ready to share the leadership principles that underpinned the resurgence of Best Buy and that he believes are at the heart of business: pursue a noble purpose, put people at the center, unleash human magic, and treat profit as an outcome. There was a time when many would call this a soft philosophy. But times are changing. Best Buy and 180 other companies signed the momentous Business Roundtable statement in support of stakeholder capitalism. The Covid-19 pandemic further pushed many businesses to lead from a place of purpose and with humanity. The changes underway are not a revolt, but a revolution. And Joly provides concrete advice on how to implement principles that can serve as beacons for the next era of capitalism. Joly himself was transformed from a hard-charging, deeply analytical McKinsey consultant to a leader who believes in what he calls human magic. He will share how so much of what he initially learned about management is either dated, incomplete, or simply wrong—including how to turn around a business, develop and implement a strategy, mobilize an organization, and what it takes to be a great leader. The leadership principles Joly lays out worked at Best Buy. They can also contribute to the necessary re-foundation of business and capitalism around purpose and humanity.

30 review for The Heart of Business: Leadership Principles for the Next Era of Capitalism

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alireza Hejazi

    Based on the author’s knowledge and professional experience, this book shares the leadership values that may be considered as the essence of business. It exemplifies the kind of leadership that corporate leaders should strive for: pursuing a noble cause, putting people first, unleashing human magic, and treating benefit as a result. The book offers concrete guidance on how to put such values into practice so that they can serve as beacons for the next age of capitalism. It informs readers of wha Based on the author’s knowledge and professional experience, this book shares the leadership values that may be considered as the essence of business. It exemplifies the kind of leadership that corporate leaders should strive for: pursuing a noble cause, putting people first, unleashing human magic, and treating benefit as a result. The book offers concrete guidance on how to put such values into practice so that they can serve as beacons for the next age of capitalism. It informs readers of what is out of date, incomplete, or simply incorrect about management and leadership. It teaches how to turn a company around, create and execute a vision, mobilize an organization, and what it takes to be a successful leader. The leadership concepts discussed in the book help to redefine business and capitalism around meaning and humanity. The book’s primary audience is business leaders.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sean Rodriguez

    Biggest takeaway from this book is that every company should get rid of stupid policies... I was first recommended this book by a TikTok account @Tycoonist. Next, I listened to the Ford Foundation Podcast: EVENT: Darren Walker and Hubert Joly discuss “The Heart of Business". Loved the content and storytelling surrounding this book so much that I ordered it. Highly recommend this book to anyone in a leadership role or who is striving to become a leader within their company. Many companies are focus Biggest takeaway from this book is that every company should get rid of stupid policies... I was first recommended this book by a TikTok account @Tycoonist. Next, I listened to the Ford Foundation Podcast: EVENT: Darren Walker and Hubert Joly discuss “The Heart of Business". Loved the content and storytelling surrounding this book so much that I ordered it. Highly recommend this book to anyone in a leadership role or who is striving to become a leader within their company. Many companies are focused on quarterly earnings and financial reports that have a consolidated snapshot of a company, but they forget a lot about one thing: Human Connections. I've seen companies solely focus on their target goals and financial reports that they have forgotten about their own employees (internal stakeholders who are the heart and soul of the company) that turnover has been rampant. This book highlights a turnaround story in Hubert Joly's life and his personal evolution through his leadership. This book was finished in the midst of Covid-19, so there are plenty of key takeaways leaders/readers can pick and pull to improve themselves.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Hannamari

    I like and agree with the key message of putting people and purpose first in leading a business. A lot of the leadership and business literature nowadays is talking about this theme from one angle or another, and I believe there’s something there. However, this book did not manage to switch on any new lights in my head or stir up any new ideas within this theme. Rather this book further solidified the importance of purpose-driven, humaine leadership and told some interesting stories from the aut I like and agree with the key message of putting people and purpose first in leading a business. A lot of the leadership and business literature nowadays is talking about this theme from one angle or another, and I believe there’s something there. However, this book did not manage to switch on any new lights in my head or stir up any new ideas within this theme. Rather this book further solidified the importance of purpose-driven, humaine leadership and told some interesting stories from the authors own experience at Best Buy.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Natesh

    The book is as much about Best buy as it is about purposeful leadership. Hubert Joly synthesizes all the lessons he learnt from his successful career at the helm of various companies. He clearly lays out what today's leaders need to focus on. I personally loved the concepts of human magic, stakeholder management and purpose of work. The initial few parts on the philosophy of work also dive into interesting territory, borrowing from various philosophers and religious works. Much recommended, but The book is as much about Best buy as it is about purposeful leadership. Hubert Joly synthesizes all the lessons he learnt from his successful career at the helm of various companies. He clearly lays out what today's leaders need to focus on. I personally loved the concepts of human magic, stakeholder management and purpose of work. The initial few parts on the philosophy of work also dive into interesting territory, borrowing from various philosophers and religious works. Much recommended, but not a page turner. This book requires introspection after every chapter.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Shilpa

    Hubert has very well captured, analyzed his experiences and also has converted them Into key learnings which anyone can leverage and implement in a daily life whether you work in a corporate or anywhere. Purpose and people define almost everything.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Isaure Badre

    A post Covid must read The heart of business is a journey. A professional and a personal one. That leads us from McKinsey at the time of the triumph of Milton Friedman in the 80’s to the turn around of Best Buy in the 2010’s when people are coming first and lead the turnaround. We all a role and a say. Purpose it is ! Merci.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Read excerpt on WSJ 4/24/2021 - Joly joined Best Buy without prior experience. He spent the first few days in the store understanding the business and focused on solving only two problems.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    Joly’s contribution, while I’m sure controversial in some circles for some of his statements around the purpose of businesses, is I believe essential to creating purpose built organizations…and in many ways to future company success. His controversial statements start early in the book. “Purpose and human connections constitute the very heart of business. And I believe they should be at the heart of the necessary and urgent refoundation of business now under way. Capitalism as we have known it f Joly’s contribution, while I’m sure controversial in some circles for some of his statements around the purpose of businesses, is I believe essential to creating purpose built organizations…and in many ways to future company success. His controversial statements start early in the book. “Purpose and human connections constitute the very heart of business. And I believe they should be at the heart of the necessary and urgent refoundation of business now under way. Capitalism as we have known it for the past few decades is in crisis. More and more people hold the system responsible for social fractures and environmental degradation. Employees, customers, and even shareholders expect much more from corporations than a blind pursuit of profit. Disengagement at work is a global epidemic.” There is a lot to unpack in this statement, but whatever your feelings on the general claims about modern capitalism, I believe that what follows in the book is excellent advice for how the modern enterprise can achieve both the “classical” and “modern” goals. In short, finding purpose for individuals at work, and in a people first strategy, is essential. He starts by talking about the concept of work. Many people think of work as a task best avoided, and certainly unfulfilling. He traces this back to the ancient Greeks. “The concept of work as a curse dates as far back as Greek antiquity, goes all the way to the Industrial Revolution and still impacts how society tends to think and feel about work today. It may have started with Zeus punishing Sisyphus to an eternity of pointless labor, pushing a large boulder up a steep hill just to watch it roll back down. Ancient Greeks viewed work as demeaning, getting in the way of the ideal of a life dedicated to contemplation and the acquisition of knowledge. Romans took a similar view. And the French word for work—travail—comes from a Latin word for a torture device.” However, Joly proposes a different model. He finds inspiration in the poem by Khalil Gibran dedicated to work: “Always you have been told that work is a curse and labour a misfortune. But I say to you. That when you work you fulfill a part of earth’s furthest dream, assigned to you when that dream was born. And in keeping yourself with labour you are in truth loving life, And to love life through labour is to be intimate with life’s inmost secret.” Ultimately, work, when driven by purpose, represents a life fulfilled. His Venn diagram for “why we work” is a masterful image, and one that simply shows the intersection of personal and group competencies and goals. It is a wonderful picture of finding “purpose.” Similarly, his graphic on the purposeful human organization is an image that easily communicates how a noble purpose unites various people in an organization. Throughout the rest of the book there are pearls of wisdom based on Joly’s experience. Some of my favorites: Page 37: Quote by Alfred de Musset in “Confession of a Child of the Century”: “Perfection does not exist. To understand it is the triumph of human intelligence; the desire to possess it is the most dangerous kind of madness.”   Page 38: Quote by Father Samuel to Hubert Joly: “You cannot love others and develop a relationship with them if you do not first accept that you are imperfect and vulnerable, and need help.”   Point on page 58: If you play to immediate shareholder returns, you risk managing “to a certain number.” Implications of this is that you “risk missing the opportunity to play offense during downturns.” Page 79: Quote by Admiral Hyman G. Rickover, U.S. Navy: “The Devil is in the details, but so is salvation.”   Page 104: Advice by Jean-Marie Descarpentries: “In a turnaround, the first priority is (1) to grow the top line, then (2) go after nonsalary expenses, and (3) optimize costs associated with employee benefits. If 1 + 2 + 3 is not enough, then, and only then, should cutting jobs where it makes sense be considered. This keeps people at the center of the purposeful human organization.”   Page 162: Idea by Howard Rankin, who drove Best Buy’s Diversity & Inclusion program. “A ‘reverse’ mentor program that paired Best Buy executives with employees who would mentor them to help broaden their understanding of differences.   Page 177: On distributed teams, “It was an emergency situation, which meant that we had to work together, act fast, stay synced, and keep information flowing. All that required having people in the same place at the same time. A patient dying on the table is best served by a medical team all in the room.”   Page 177: “Delegation and autonomy lead to human magic only when people are both skilled and motivated.”   Page 193: On helping people to take calculated risks: “The key is to protect the downside and to take calculated, reversible gambles.”   Page 195: Quote by Cardinal John Henry Newman: “Growth is the only evidence of life.”   Page 224: Motto on the statue of Curt Carlson: “Illegitimi non carborundum” – loosely translated as “Don’t let the bastards grind you down.” Near the end, Joly finishes with essential wisdom for any leader in a modern organization. “Today’s leaders have to be purposeful, be clear about whom they serve, be conscious of what their true role is, be driven by values, and be authentic—the five “Be’s” of the purposeful leader.” As a summary, I could not agree more. See my other reviews here!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Varun

    A blog, not a book. More like a blog post than a book. Nothing new here. Refashioning the purpose of business, of work, and of capitalism via purpose, mission, and people. Have heard the story before.

  10. 5 out of 5

    broken.tsuba

    This is a very simplistic book on leadership, nothing groundbreaking here. It may serve as an introduction if you’re just getting into leadership but there are much better books for that. I rate this as average because it’s suitable for most of the population to read and maybe get a couple pointers from, but anyone serious about leadership will get little out of it. I should mention one disappointment that I don’t care about but others might: the book uses Best Buy in most of their examples and m This is a very simplistic book on leadership, nothing groundbreaking here. It may serve as an introduction if you’re just getting into leadership but there are much better books for that. I rate this as average because it’s suitable for most of the population to read and maybe get a couple pointers from, but anyone serious about leadership will get little out of it. I should mention one disappointment that I don’t care about but others might: the book uses Best Buy in most of their examples and markets that as a focal point, however, they use this trending format of “state principle, give example, and reinforce.” That’s great for me because I don’t have to waste time reading bs to get the point but because there is a running narrative here it gets disjointed and you can’t feel the power achieved though all the principles applied to get them there. Best Buy’s turnaround could have been made into such an interesting narrative if they told it straight through and allowed the reader to glean the principles from the story instead of being handed to them in bites. It would have been much more compelling, uplifting, and empowering.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Shobhit

    The turnaround story of best buy. I liked how leaders like Hubert are questioning the Industrial Age management practices and challenging older views of capitalism. The book resonated with me a lot and gave me words to put down my thoughts. Money is not the sole motivation for employees. Purpose of a company is not “just” profit making. These days we hear of impact startup and all when entrepreneurs is motivated by social cause. But then isn’t social problems removed sustainably when the company The turnaround story of best buy. I liked how leaders like Hubert are questioning the Industrial Age management practices and challenging older views of capitalism. The book resonated with me a lot and gave me words to put down my thoughts. Money is not the sole motivation for employees. Purpose of a company is not “just” profit making. These days we hear of impact startup and all when entrepreneurs is motivated by social cause. But then isn’t social problems removed sustainably when the company does it in economically profitable way? Why have another way? Why greed controls some management and then governments have to think of imposing carbon tax, sewage tax and all. Another great idea is that not all turnaround means job cut as first step. Purpose is what drives humans and should be found in organizations too. Is mental peace so less in world these days? I end of hearing Wim Hoff or Hubert talking of meditation as suggested in India’s ancient scriptures. Maybe world needs to grow now in mind rather than just material world or comfort.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    Disclaimer, I work by Best Buy where Hubert was our CEO for awhile including when I worked there. I really enjoyed his outlook on work in this book, but I also think that it seems he didn't get to where he was by living what he's promoting now, which is a new way of thinking about business and treating customers and employees very well and hoping that profit will come as an outcome of both of those functions. Hindsight is always 50/50. He speaks about assured living and how great that portion of Disclaimer, I work by Best Buy where Hubert was our CEO for awhile including when I worked there. I really enjoyed his outlook on work in this book, but I also think that it seems he didn't get to where he was by living what he's promoting now, which is a new way of thinking about business and treating customers and employees very well and hoping that profit will come as an outcome of both of those functions. Hindsight is always 50/50. He speaks about assured living and how great that portion of the business was going to be, but I believe that business is not longer a service that is offered by BBY. With all that said, I still really enjoyed it and would recommend to anyone who also enjoys reading about business strategy.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Araba

    Quotes that stuck: - "Operational progress creates strategic degrees of freedom" p.111, in reference to turnarounds - "Measures are not perfect. But no measure is, so imperfection is no excuse for inaction" p.94, in reference to improving business metrics on diversity, sustainability, and corporate purpose - "What separates great leaders from good leaders is not the quality but quantity of decisions" p.113, in reference to making many decisions to create momentum and move the organization forward - Quotes that stuck: - "Operational progress creates strategic degrees of freedom" p.111, in reference to turnarounds - "Measures are not perfect. But no measure is, so imperfection is no excuse for inaction" p.94, in reference to improving business metrics on diversity, sustainability, and corporate purpose - "What separates great leaders from good leaders is not the quality but quantity of decisions" p.113, in reference to making many decisions to create momentum and move the organization forward - "Is it aligned with my purpose? Will I be able to make a significant positive contribution in this role? Will I enjoy it?...Is this opportunity going to be meaningful, impactful, joyful?" p.212, in reference to how to guide decision-making for career choices

  14. 5 out of 5

    Julian Walker

    A genuinely interesting perspective on management and corporate focus - and, to be honest, the only book I have ever read which draws on inspirations as diverse as Asterix the Gaul and the Jesuit priesthood. Several of the illustrative anecdotes were already well known to me, but I liked the way he gives a new slant to them with his focus on creating an honest sense of purpose, rather than a bottom line, financially-driven diktat. This is the future of successful management - re-defining success a A genuinely interesting perspective on management and corporate focus - and, to be honest, the only book I have ever read which draws on inspirations as diverse as Asterix the Gaul and the Jesuit priesthood. Several of the illustrative anecdotes were already well known to me, but I liked the way he gives a new slant to them with his focus on creating an honest sense of purpose, rather than a bottom line, financially-driven diktat. This is the future of successful management - re-defining success as an all encompassing people initiative - and one from which I hope corporate life will benefit.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Graham Whittington

    Surprisingly moving book about business leadership. It often reads with the starry-eyed optimism of the Jerry Maguire memo, but it’s backed up by Joly’s real-life experience turning Best Buy around by having the company and its leaders focus on putting people first. Joly makes a good case for investing in employees in a way that gets them invested in the company, focusing on the satisfaction of all stakeholders instead of myopically seeking to please shareholders, pivoting business models with t Surprisingly moving book about business leadership. It often reads with the starry-eyed optimism of the Jerry Maguire memo, but it’s backed up by Joly’s real-life experience turning Best Buy around by having the company and its leaders focus on putting people first. Joly makes a good case for investing in employees in a way that gets them invested in the company, focusing on the satisfaction of all stakeholders instead of myopically seeking to please shareholders, pivoting business models with the changing economy, and otherwise being a purposeful leader who fosters human connections. Joly maintains that with a promising product and adherence to these philosophies, profits will follow. It’s probably not novel or groundbreaking, but it’s a refreshing outlook, especially to someone who always thought the shareholder-focused approach is curious in that it predictably encourages short-term risks to achieve gains at the expense of long-term viability. Random thoughts: -Some folks may be turned off by Joly’s tacit acceptance of capitalism as a force for good. Whatever the system, though, businesses will be around, and the book can relate to leadership in almost any workplace. -He gives a lot of concrete tips and examples, which was helpful. I also appreciated how he ended chapters with questions to ponder over. -Joly gave examples of companies successfully prioritizing what the book recommends (e.g., investing in your stakeholders and treating profits as byproducts of such points of focus), but it would’ve been interesting to hear about companies that followed this approach and failed. I’m sure there’d be valuable lessons to learn from that. -I just watched Loki and every time Joly talked about “noble purpose” (which he does *a lot*) all I could think of was Richard Grant Loki yelling “GLORIOUS PURPOOOSE!!” That’s more a me-right-here-right-now thing tho lmao.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ietrio

    Capitalism has died back in the 19th century. 20th century was the time of mass produced killings and unprecedented expansion of the Total State. But here is a witch doctor that will do the rain dance and his tailor made suit and show that Capitalism is all about doing what the people in power want. If you want to find out more, get yourself a copy of The Vampire Economy: Doing Business Under Fascism. Capitalism has died back in the 19th century. 20th century was the time of mass produced killings and unprecedented expansion of the Total State. But here is a witch doctor that will do the rain dance and his tailor made suit and show that Capitalism is all about doing what the people in power want. If you want to find out more, get yourself a copy of The Vampire Economy: Doing Business Under Fascism.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Luca Morgan

    I want to take a moment to appreciate Hack West the Credit Specialist for all they do for humanity, yes I say humanity because I have been a victim of scam where they ripped my money off without doing anything. Hack West changed the narrative by fixing my credit in less than a week. Credit card debts, students loans, collections and medical bills were cleared and my score was pushed to 809 within this time frame. What else can I say than to tell the whole person who care to fix their credit to g I want to take a moment to appreciate Hack West the Credit Specialist for all they do for humanity, yes I say humanity because I have been a victim of scam where they ripped my money off without doing anything. Hack West changed the narrative by fixing my credit in less than a week. Credit card debts, students loans, collections and medical bills were cleared and my score was pushed to 809 within this time frame. What else can I say than to tell the whole person who care to fix their credit to go with HACKWEST at WRITEME dot COM or 424 307 2638 Cheers!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Boaz

    I try to read at least one business book a quarter (alongside books of other genres). Business books are increasingly common these days as many companies discovered they are a great marketing tool and business leaders view them as a mean of personal expression. These make me wary when I start to read them… Hubert’s book is a fantastic one that is high on the scale of authenticity. He is not shy in stressing his successes, but also completely comfortable sharing his failures and mistakes. All in I try to read at least one business book a quarter (alongside books of other genres). Business books are increasingly common these days as many companies discovered they are a great marketing tool and business leaders view them as a mean of personal expression. These make me wary when I start to read them… Hubert’s book is a fantastic one that is high on the scale of authenticity. He is not shy in stressing his successes, but also completely comfortable sharing his failures and mistakes. All in all it is educational and enlightening and very well worth reading - especially for those, like me, who struggle with the greedy form of capitalism that has caused so much damage to the world and to many of us an individuals.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joe Sabado

    It makes so much sense now why my experience with best buy has been so much better! Starts with leadership To read the leadership principles behind Best Buy after seeing the positive transformation of the company, especially during Covid-19 makes so much sense now. There was a time few years ago when I vowed to never go back to Best Buy again due to bad customer experience. But during Covid-19, I found myself going back to buy my computing devices as the experience was so much better.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Phil Jenkins

    Hubert (Hubie, or "The Hubes", as I like to call him), lays out a different leadership paradigm than were typically fed. In this book, he explains how and why the best leaders start and end with people, not profit, as their focus. I took some interesting notes from Mr Joly's book, and I intend to begin to incorporate them into my management style. Time will tell how that works out! Hubert (Hubie, or "The Hubes", as I like to call him), lays out a different leadership paradigm than were typically fed. In this book, he explains how and why the best leaders start and end with people, not profit, as their focus. I took some interesting notes from Mr Joly's book, and I intend to begin to incorporate them into my management style. Time will tell how that works out!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andy Cooper

    Inspiring leader This is one of the best leadership books I have ever read. Hubert provides a compelling and clear way forward that brings a more purposeful and human centred approach to business. Highly recommended to all leaders and aspiring leaders as well as those in governance roles.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    This is a truly remarkable account on how the right kind of leadership will take an organization to the next level of success. Hubert Joly was able to show us in this book that by going to the heart of business we will be able to create an environment where success is always possible.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Valtteri Hirsi

    Purposeful writing For this book there was really purpose to write it. Good insights and good enough practical list to think about how to change your organization to enlightenment. :)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Christoph Monschein

    very well written leadership book on how to be a purposeful leader who develops an organization driven by its purpose not an academic book but rather an account of the author's own story and learnings very well written leadership book on how to be a purposeful leader who develops an organization driven by its purpose not an academic book but rather an account of the author's own story and learnings

  25. 5 out of 5

    Justin Palmer

    This was a good book but I just didn't connect with it for some reason. I don't know why because it was written well, but it just didn't give me additional insight that i have not gleaned from other books This was a good book but I just didn't connect with it for some reason. I don't know why because it was written well, but it just didn't give me additional insight that i have not gleaned from other books

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tlangemo

    Tremendous book. For me, life changing in the timing and circumstance of reading it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lee Boyd

    Great book for leaders. This book gives you a great list of things you should be grading yourself on daily.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joanne

    Story of the Best Buy overhaul was really inspiring and gave some real world insight to running a business.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Teri Temme

    Should be required reading!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Eli

    Excellent overview what it takes run a successful company in the 21st Century.

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