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Stakeholder Capitalism: A Global Economy that Works for Progress, People and Planet

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Think of the global economy as a jigsaw puzzle. At the heart of solving the puzzle -- and address global disturbance and uncertainty--lies three identifiable issues that need need to fit: First, income and other inequality within societies has been on the rise, while productivity and wage growth slowed, and countries are burdened by debt. Second, the market power of the wo Think of the global economy as a jigsaw puzzle. At the heart of solving the puzzle -- and address global disturbance and uncertainty--lies three identifiable issues that need need to fit: First, income and other inequality within societies has been on the rise, while productivity and wage growth slowed, and countries are burdened by debt. Second, the market power of the world's largest companies reached unprecedented levels, raising questions on the spread of innovation and productivity gains. And third, the exploitation of natural resources is leading to a deteriorating environment, affecting the lives of many for the worse. The debate over what caused this situation is still open: whether laissez-faire governments, a poorly managed globalization, or the rise of technology that favours the few, the possible culprits are legion. In any case, Schwab argues our current system has failed to properly register and address many of the issues we are now faced with. What are the real causes of our system's shortcomings, and what are false positives? Do solutions lie in small adjustments to our current system, or a complete overhaul of it? And what best practices exist around the world, including Asia, that would allow for better outcomes? There are no easy answers, and no single stakeholder can provide them. But it is certain that individual actors do have agency, and that policies matter, when it comes to dealing with external forces. Moreover, as success stories from the Switzerland to Singapore, and from Costa Rica to China show it is only when government, businesses and individuals all play their respective roles, and agree on a social contract with shared responsibility that societal outcomes will be optimal. The Jigsaw Economy addresss these problems, ad provides achievable answers to solve them. Piece by piece, this new book by Professor Klaus Schwab, Founder and Chairman of the World Economic Forum, shares answers for all stakholderes in the global economy, rich and poor, vested and disenfranchised, engaged or searching. optimistic. The goall: to address problems and provide solutions, piece by piece, stakeholder by stakeholdere, country by coutrny, world citizen by world citizen.


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Think of the global economy as a jigsaw puzzle. At the heart of solving the puzzle -- and address global disturbance and uncertainty--lies three identifiable issues that need need to fit: First, income and other inequality within societies has been on the rise, while productivity and wage growth slowed, and countries are burdened by debt. Second, the market power of the wo Think of the global economy as a jigsaw puzzle. At the heart of solving the puzzle -- and address global disturbance and uncertainty--lies three identifiable issues that need need to fit: First, income and other inequality within societies has been on the rise, while productivity and wage growth slowed, and countries are burdened by debt. Second, the market power of the world's largest companies reached unprecedented levels, raising questions on the spread of innovation and productivity gains. And third, the exploitation of natural resources is leading to a deteriorating environment, affecting the lives of many for the worse. The debate over what caused this situation is still open: whether laissez-faire governments, a poorly managed globalization, or the rise of technology that favours the few, the possible culprits are legion. In any case, Schwab argues our current system has failed to properly register and address many of the issues we are now faced with. What are the real causes of our system's shortcomings, and what are false positives? Do solutions lie in small adjustments to our current system, or a complete overhaul of it? And what best practices exist around the world, including Asia, that would allow for better outcomes? There are no easy answers, and no single stakeholder can provide them. But it is certain that individual actors do have agency, and that policies matter, when it comes to dealing with external forces. Moreover, as success stories from the Switzerland to Singapore, and from Costa Rica to China show it is only when government, businesses and individuals all play their respective roles, and agree on a social contract with shared responsibility that societal outcomes will be optimal. The Jigsaw Economy addresss these problems, ad provides achievable answers to solve them. Piece by piece, this new book by Professor Klaus Schwab, Founder and Chairman of the World Economic Forum, shares answers for all stakholderes in the global economy, rich and poor, vested and disenfranchised, engaged or searching. optimistic. The goall: to address problems and provide solutions, piece by piece, stakeholder by stakeholdere, country by coutrny, world citizen by world citizen.

30 review for Stakeholder Capitalism: A Global Economy that Works for Progress, People and Planet

  1. 5 out of 5

    Szatmári Tamás

    I wanted to love this book so badly. But I expected something else. The history of our current neoliberal economic model is comprehensive and also easy to read with full of stories. I lack a more thorough comparison of the shareholder and the state capitalism. I fully lack the practical advices that a simple business can follow. This book is more for policy makers and economic enthusiast. I admire the initiatives of World Economic Forum, but for practical thoughts one should read Frederic Laloux I wanted to love this book so badly. But I expected something else. The history of our current neoliberal economic model is comprehensive and also easy to read with full of stories. I lack a more thorough comparison of the shareholder and the state capitalism. I fully lack the practical advices that a simple business can follow. This book is more for policy makers and economic enthusiast. I admire the initiatives of World Economic Forum, but for practical thoughts one should read Frederic Laloux or Jurgen Apello.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Seba

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book doesn't really say anything wrong. At the same time, this book doesn't say anything new. It feels like the writers tried their best to reach a target number of pages to earn their "badge of seriousness," but other than that it is really a fairly generalistic, basic, and overall non-essential read. The whole book could have fit in a tweet. This book doesn't really say anything wrong. At the same time, this book doesn't say anything new. It feels like the writers tried their best to reach a target number of pages to earn their "badge of seriousness," but other than that it is really a fairly generalistic, basic, and overall non-essential read. The whole book could have fit in a tweet.

  3. 4 out of 5

    David Nygaard

    Stakeholder Capitalism was an engaging and inspiring read. The first two-thirds can be a bit discouraging, as they outline the history and gravity of the economic, societal and environmental challenges that we face, but the last third is concrete, hopeful and constructive. Klaus Schwab, with the help of Peter Vanham, lays out an economic history of the past century, describing how “neither the neoliberal ideology nor the socialist one works well in our current era and that “protectionism and auta Stakeholder Capitalism was an engaging and inspiring read. The first two-thirds can be a bit discouraging, as they outline the history and gravity of the economic, societal and environmental challenges that we face, but the last third is concrete, hopeful and constructive. Klaus Schwab, with the help of Peter Vanham, lays out an economic history of the past century, describing how “neither the neoliberal ideology nor the socialist one works well in our current era and that “protectionism and autarky” are not sustainable principles. My favourite parts of the book were in the latter half, where the authors provide examples of how the principles of stakeholder capitalism have been and can be successfully deployed to link innovation in both the digital and physical world. One of the best examples was that of the Danish shipping company Maersk. To quote Maersk CEO Jim Snabe: “If you add the latest technologies [of the Fourth Industrial Revolution] to . . . [companies operating in the physical world] . . . they can have a big impact, because without the physical world, we are nothing.” Maersk has linked its performance to the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals and in so doing, has breathed new life into the company’s purpose, and that of its employees. This made me think of Canada’s traditional strengths in its resource sectors, and the potential to bring “equitable prosperity” to all, another key concept in the book. The aim of governments, according to the authors, should be to “enable any individual actor to maximize his or her prosperity but do so in a way that is equitable for both its people and the planet.” They argue that over the past 50 years a narrow focus on GDP has led to declining growth, rising debt and growing inequality. They argue instead for a “a broader dashboard of metrics” which are already being adopted by the OECD and others. As examples they provide Singapore and New Zealand, the latter of which prioritizes intergenerational well-being in its world-leading Living Standards Framework (LSF). This provides the “clear compass”. What’s the impact? Stakeholder Capitalism Metrics developed by the leading global accountancy and consulting firms in conjunction with the World Economic Forum will be added to companies’ annual reporting in the next two to three years. My only major complaint would be that the authors tend to gloss over issues of freedom and human rights, especially when discussing China. The book would have been stronger had it made a more compelling defence of democracy, which is just as necessary for human progress as stakeholder capitalism. The book ends on a hopeful note, namely that “The state of the world isn’t a given but that we can improve it if we are all committed to a better world.” Agreed. Five stars.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Simmons

    The first two-thirds of this book felt like filler: superficial overviews of very important topics (income inequality, climate change, and the limitations of shareholder capitalism) that I have seen much better explained in other books. Schwab finally hits his stride in the last third of the book, where he focuses on companies and countries that are managing -- or at least attempting -- new models of holistic business and policy approaches that might, if we all somehow pull together (and that's The first two-thirds of this book felt like filler: superficial overviews of very important topics (income inequality, climate change, and the limitations of shareholder capitalism) that I have seen much better explained in other books. Schwab finally hits his stride in the last third of the book, where he focuses on companies and countries that are managing -- or at least attempting -- new models of holistic business and policy approaches that might, if we all somehow pull together (and that's a big IF), keep us from plunging over the economic/environmental cliff.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Horng Jiunn

    Schwab argued convincingly, mapping his prolific journey with chronological challenges and megatrends, from post-war affairs into present landscape amidst the pandemic, and he also conversed about his preferred system going forth. I am intrigued with his ideas for a better global system, on policies framework and advance collaboration to help deal with the amplification of new technologies, and how to equitably share its values for a broader objective than profits, into the health and wealth of Schwab argued convincingly, mapping his prolific journey with chronological challenges and megatrends, from post-war affairs into present landscape amidst the pandemic, and he also conversed about his preferred system going forth. I am intrigued with his ideas for a better global system, on policies framework and advance collaboration to help deal with the amplification of new technologies, and how to equitably share its values for a broader objective than profits, into the health and wealth of societies overall, as well as that of the planet and future generations. Being part of the tech branch from the container port industry in Singapore, his study into Maersk and Salesforce transformation by redefining their culture and core principles, carries a deep sense of purpose and is alarming inspiring to me.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Andy Lee

    We as a human society have gone down the wrong path for the past half century, adopting neoliberal ideals that have increased inequality and destroyed the natural world. We can address these issues by adopting stakeholder capitalism, a system where: "the interests of all stakeholders in the economy and society are taken into account, with companies optimizing for more than just short-term profits, and governments are guardians of equality of opportunity, a level playing field in competition, and We as a human society have gone down the wrong path for the past half century, adopting neoliberal ideals that have increased inequality and destroyed the natural world. We can address these issues by adopting stakeholder capitalism, a system where: "the interests of all stakeholders in the economy and society are taken into account, with companies optimizing for more than just short-term profits, and governments are guardians of equality of opportunity, a level playing field in competition, and a fair contribution of and distribution to all stakeholders with regards to sustainability and inclusiveness of the system" Along with more equitable outcomes and less destruction of the environment, stakeholder capitalism results in higher engagement and connection between all stakeholders; companies, employees, and governments become more flexible with the changing times; and consumers will benefit from increased competition and innovation. There is hope, and the author makes it clear in his writing.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jorrr77

  8. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Edling

  9. 5 out of 5

    Matteo Magnani

  10. 5 out of 5

    unknown

  11. 4 out of 5

    Breck

  12. 4 out of 5

    Eric Lauritzen

  13. 5 out of 5

    Andrew C

  14. 4 out of 5

    Erika Yohana

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ville Samuli Leivo

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jesse

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kvitorm

  18. 5 out of 5

    Henrique

  19. 5 out of 5

    Syamiir BIN

  20. 5 out of 5

    Evgeniy

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ian

  22. 5 out of 5

    juan antonio castro

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gabriela Pricop

  24. 4 out of 5

    Maria Paz Oliva

  25. 4 out of 5

    Grace Lane

  26. 5 out of 5

    Paul Mamani

  27. 5 out of 5

    Güneş

  28. 5 out of 5

    St John

  29. 5 out of 5

    ALEC WANG

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sky’

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