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Keep your brain young, healthy, and sharp with this science-driven guide to protecting your mind from decline by neurosurgeon and CNN chief medical correspondent Sanjay Gupta. Throughout our life, we look for ways to keep our mind sharp and effortlessly productive. Now, globetrotting neurosurgeon Dr. Sanjay Gupta offers insights from top scientists all over the world, whos Keep your brain young, healthy, and sharp with this science-driven guide to protecting your mind from decline by neurosurgeon and CNN chief medical correspondent Sanjay Gupta. Throughout our life, we look for ways to keep our mind sharp and effortlessly productive. Now, globetrotting neurosurgeon Dr. Sanjay Gupta offers insights from top scientists all over the world, whose cutting-edge research can help you heighten and protect brain function and maintain cognitive health at any age. Keep Sharp debunks common myths about aging and cognitive decline, explores whether there’s a “best” diet or exercise regimen for the brain, and explains whether it’s healthier to play video games that test memory and processing speed, or to engage in more social interaction. Discover what we can learn from “super-brained” people who are in their eighties and nineties with no signs of slowing down—and whether there are truly any benefits to drugs, supplements, and vitamins. Dr. Gupta also addresses brain disease, particularly Alzheimer’s, answers all your questions about the signs and symptoms, and shows how to ward against it and stay healthy while caring for a partner in cognitive decline. He likewise provides you with a personalized twelve-week program featuring practical strategies to strengthen your brain every day. Keep Sharp is the only owner’s manual you’ll need to keep your brain young and healthy regardless of your age!


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Keep your brain young, healthy, and sharp with this science-driven guide to protecting your mind from decline by neurosurgeon and CNN chief medical correspondent Sanjay Gupta. Throughout our life, we look for ways to keep our mind sharp and effortlessly productive. Now, globetrotting neurosurgeon Dr. Sanjay Gupta offers insights from top scientists all over the world, whos Keep your brain young, healthy, and sharp with this science-driven guide to protecting your mind from decline by neurosurgeon and CNN chief medical correspondent Sanjay Gupta. Throughout our life, we look for ways to keep our mind sharp and effortlessly productive. Now, globetrotting neurosurgeon Dr. Sanjay Gupta offers insights from top scientists all over the world, whose cutting-edge research can help you heighten and protect brain function and maintain cognitive health at any age. Keep Sharp debunks common myths about aging and cognitive decline, explores whether there’s a “best” diet or exercise regimen for the brain, and explains whether it’s healthier to play video games that test memory and processing speed, or to engage in more social interaction. Discover what we can learn from “super-brained” people who are in their eighties and nineties with no signs of slowing down—and whether there are truly any benefits to drugs, supplements, and vitamins. Dr. Gupta also addresses brain disease, particularly Alzheimer’s, answers all your questions about the signs and symptoms, and shows how to ward against it and stay healthy while caring for a partner in cognitive decline. He likewise provides you with a personalized twelve-week program featuring practical strategies to strengthen your brain every day. Keep Sharp is the only owner’s manual you’ll need to keep your brain young and healthy regardless of your age!

30 review for Keep Sharp Audiobook Sanjay Gupta (by Sanjay Gupta Keep Sharp Audio CD)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dr. Appu Sasidharan

    Summary (Regular Review) Dr. Sanjay Gupta and Dr. Anthony Fauci are the two names we heard the most during the COVID-19 pandemic. I found every video by Dr. Gupta (Neurosurgeon and CNN chief medical correspondent), from the intricate details about the coronavirus to something very general, like grocery shopping during the pandemic, interesting and informative. This is the latest book written by Dr. Sanjay Gupta about keeping your brain sharp and healthy irrespective of your age. This book Summary (Regular Review) Dr. Sanjay Gupta and Dr. Anthony Fauci are the two names we heard the most during the COVID-19 pandemic. I found every video by Dr. Gupta (Neurosurgeon and CNN chief medical correspondent), from the intricate details about the coronavirus to something very general, like grocery shopping during the pandemic, interesting and informative. This is the latest book written by Dr. Sanjay Gupta about keeping your brain sharp and healthy irrespective of your age. This book is divided into three parts. The first part deals with some basic facts related to the brain. The second part mentions the practical strategies needed to protect and heighten your brain function, like 1)exercise; 2) sense of purpose, learning, and discovery 3) sleep and relaxation; 4) nutrition; and 5) social connection. The third part deals with the challenges of diagnosing and treating brain diseases like Vascular dementia, Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB), Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD), and Alzheimer's Disease. He discusses aging, brain-friendly diet, exercise, and common diseases affecting the brain in detail. He is giving us methods to find out whether we are at risk for brain decline and specific ways to tackle it What I learned from this book 1) Is Alzheimer's disease and dementia the same? This is one of the common misconceptions of many people. They use these terms interchangeably. Dr. Gupta is discussing this matter in detail in this book. "Alzheimer's disease, which accounts for more than half the cases of dementia, gets nearly all the attention, and as a result, the terms dementia and Alzheimer's are often used interchangeably. They shouldn't be. The word dementia, however, is steeped in our common vernacular, and so is the association with Alzheimer's disease. I use both terms with the hope that the conversation, and the words we use to describe the broad condition of cognitive decline, will shift in the future." 2)Is it possible to improve the brain function of older people? It is a general misconception that brain function can't be improved after we pass the age of 30. With the help of multiple research and his personal experiences as a Neurosurgeon, Dr. Gupta is sharing the vital information that can change the lives of many middle-aged and aged people through this book. Yes, we can indeed improve our brain function at any age. “The brain can be continuously and consistently enriched throughout your life no matter your age or access to resources.” 3) Can we make a person at risk follow a routine by telling him that he might have a higher probability of Heart attack or Alzheimer's disease? The answer to the above question is no. When we are trying to scare a patient or a relative to ensure that he will follow a routine to avoid the complications, we are actually activating the patient's amygdala. We will get swift and intense reactions when we try to scare them, like joining a gym and working out continuously for the next couple of weeks due to his fear of heart attack or Alzheimer's disease. Sadly, the action starts in the brain's emotional Center and bypasses the judgment and executive function areas of the brain. So the action will be in-coordinated and transient. This is why it is said that the fear motivation causes stress, limits compliance, and destroys creativity. “Don’t try to inspire people with fear. It doesn’t work well, and it doesn’t last long.” “Fear-based messaging will never lead to a long-term effective strategy because it is not the way we are wired.” 4) What is “Valley of death” in Medical Science? The researches show that there is an alarming increase in the cases of Alzheimer's disease. Sadly, there hasn't been a single new treatment for it since 2002 despite multiple clinical trials. “The gap between brain science and good therapeutics in drug discovery for brain disorders has been called the 'valley of death.'" 5) Why are some people absolutely crushed by events in the news, while others are emboldened and undaunted? Our brain's resilience determines whether it can be strengthened or battered after hearing or experiencing something tough. "A resilient brain can withstand ongoing trauma, think differently, stave off brain-related illnesses including depression, and retain cognitive memory for peak performance. Moreover, possessing a resilient brain is what separates strategic, visionary thinkers from more average ones. It is not necessarily IQ or even educational level. It is the ability to improve the brain from challenging experiences instead of shrinking it." 6) How can you prevent Alzheimer’s disease? Dr. Gupta mentions that clean living is one of the best ways to decrease the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease and all other mind-destroying disorders. He says that it can lower the risk immensely, even in those who have genetic risk factors. "Clean living can slash your risk of developing a serious mind-destroying disorder, including Alzheimer's disease, even if you carry genetic risk factors. No matter what your DNA says, a good diet, regular exercise, not smoking, limiting alcohol, and some other surprising lifestyle decisions, can change that destiny." 7) What is the easiest and most effective method to improve your brain function? Sleep is something which the millennials give significantly less importance. In their rat race of conquering the world, most of them sacrifice sleep. But what they are doing is destroying their brain function as sleep is the best way to improve brain function. "Chronic sleep deprivation, for example, can lead to a staggering amount of memory loss that can even appear like the onset of dementia. Sleeping well is one of the easiest and most effective ways to improve your brain functions and your ability to learn and remember new knowledge (it improves every system in the body). Sleep deprivation can also disrupt the movement of memories from short to long term." 8) Why hydration is very important for your attention? Dr.Gupta tells us the importance of water for brain function. "Your brain is roughly 73 percent water (same for your heart), and that is why it takes only 2 percent dehydration to affect your attention, memory, and other cognitive skills, so drinking just a few ounces of water can reverse that." 9) What is the paradox of remembering by forgetting? Forgetting is as important as remembering to our brain. Dr.Gupta points out intricacies in our brain functioning and tells us that we have to forget more to remember more. "How you pay attention to incoming data, however, maybe the most important factor in how much of that information you remember. I should point out that forgetting does have significant value. As I mentioned, if you remembered everything that comes into your brain, your brain would not work properly and your ability to creatively think and imagine would be diminished. Everyday life would be difficult; sure, you'd be able to recall long lists and cite elegiac love poems, but you'd struggle to grasp abstract concepts and even to recognize faces. There's a group of neurons that are charged with helping the brain to forget, and that are most active at night during sleep when the brain is reorganizing itself and preparing for the next day of incoming information. Scientists discovered these "forgetting" neurons in 2019, which helps us further understand the importance of sleep—and the merits of forgetting. It's a beautiful paradox: In order to remember, we have to forget to some degree." 10) Is there any relation between fast food and memory loss? The latest studies show that junk food is one of the leading causes of diseases like Alzheimer's disease. "Alzheimer's disease could be another potential side effect of a sugary Western diet. People with type 2 diabetes may be at least twice as likely to develop Alzheimer's disease, and those with prediabetes or metabolic syndrome may have an increased risk for having predementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI). If the risk for Alzheimer's disease goes up with metabolic disorders, then it makes sense that the risk also rises with unhealthy weight gain that has metabolic consequences. The science now speaks to this fact. Carrying extra weight around the abdomen has been shown to be particularly harmful to the brain." 11) Can a new hobby make your brain sharper? Most of you must have heard that a new hobby can make you sharper. Dr.Gupta is trying to explain it in-depth with the help of a 2014 study from the UT. "A 2014 study from the University of Texas at Dallas tells us that picking up a new hobby, like painting or digital photography, or even learning a new piece of software or language can strengthen the brain. Doing something new can even be seeing a 3D movie, joining a new club, or even using your nondominant hand to brush your teeth." 12) What is the best exercise for making your brain sharper? I have seen many people making the mistake of opting for weightlifting and altogether avoiding aerobic exercises. Aerobic exercises are essential for our brain function. "Weightlifting is important, but not enough on its own. Pumping iron does confer cognitive benefits, as some studies show among older people who just lifted weights for a year. But to gain the most benefits, and which most studies prove, you have to get aerobic through activities like jogging, swimming, bicycling, dancing, hiking, or brisk walking at least five days a week for at least twenty to thirty minutes. Don't forget to engage in strength training two to three days this week, avoiding back-to-back strength training days so you give your muscles time to recover." 13) Will naps affect your brain function? This is a vital topic in this era where sleep deprivation is extremely common, and naps have become necessary for many people. "The evidence on whether naps are beneficial to brain health in older adults is still unclear. If you must, limit napping to thirty minutes in the early afternoon. Longer naps later in the day can disrupt nighttime sleep." 14) Are Superfoods hyped products of consumerism? Dr.Gupta Medically debunks superfoods perfectly in this book "The term superfood has no medical meaning whatsoever. Although it implies that a food provides health benefits, it's a marketing term the food industry uses to sell more product." 15) Dr.Gupta’s S.H.A.R.P. way of eating for a healthier brain “S: Slash the Sugar and Stick to Your ABCs H: Hydrate Smartly A: Add More Omega-3 Fatty Acids from Dietary Sources R: Reduce Portions P: Plan Ahead (plan your main meals once or twice a week in advance)" “The percentage I strive to eat is 70 percent carbs (unrefined and unprocessed), 15 percent fat, and 15 percent protein.” 16) Are organic foods overrated? When you go grocery shopping in Walmart or Target, or any other grocery store, you will see a considerable section allocated for organic foods. Is it worth it to spend more on organic foods? "Contrary to reports in the media, we have no good proof that eating organic foods provides any more nutrition than conventionally grown foods. Most people concerned about organic versus conventional are thinking about how pesticides, herbicides, and trace amounts of hormones and antibiotics can potentially have adverse health effects, even if that has not been adequately proven. When people ask me if it's ideal to eat purely organic, I say that given the current science, in general it's not necessary." 17) Can marriage decrease the chance of getting dementia? “Researchers at Michigan State University found that married people are less likely to experience dementia as they age, and divorcees are about twice as likely as married people to develop dementia (widowed and never-married people have risk profiles in between the married and divorced groups).” 18) Will social isolation cause Alzheimer’s disease? Loneliness is an important cause of the cognitive decline. “Engaging socially in a larger group, particularly when centered around some sort of challenging activity, seems to be the most protective against Alzheimer's disease.” 19) Who are invisible second patients? "Caregivers of spouses with dementia are up to six times more likely to develop dementia than people in the general population. These people are called the "invisible second patients." My favourite three lines from this book “Flossing—and brushing—your teeth twice daily removes food debris and bacteria buildup that can ultimately lead to gum disease and increased risk of stroke.” "Unfortunately, crossword puzzles flex only a portion of your brain, mostly its word finding ability (also called fluency). So while they might help you excel at that, they won't necessarily keep your brain sharp in any general, overall sense." “A body in motion tends to stay in motion. And, if you have not been exercising, starting today can significantly protect your brain later. It’s never too late!” Rating 5/5 This book contains one of the most detailed and updated information about the brain and its diseases. The amount of information in it is so vast. Each page has at least one crucial piece of information that can save human life in one way or the other. It contains the right mix of Scientific knowledge and practical wisdom to properly educate us regarding the intricacies of brain functioning and how to deal with brain diseases, making it a must-read one for everyone.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Elyse Walters

    Audiobook....read by the author: Sanjay Gupta Sanjay Gupta is a respected well-known neurosurgeon, medical reporter, and writer. He has a well- deserved reputation. I like and respect him myself. I enjoy listening to him on CNN....etc. I appreciated Sanjay’s journalism reporting following the attacks on 911. That said....this book isn’t higher than 3 stars for me. I revisited things I’ve learned from past years— dating back to 2010 when I read a book called “The Secret Life of the Grown-Up Brain” Audiobook....read by the author: Sanjay Gupta Sanjay Gupta is a respected well-known neurosurgeon, medical reporter, and writer. He has a well- deserved reputation. I like and respect him myself. I enjoy listening to him on CNN....etc. I appreciated Sanjay’s journalism reporting following the attacks on 911. That said....this book isn’t higher than 3 stars for me. I revisited things I’ve learned from past years— dating back to 2010 when I read a book called “The Secret Life of the Grown-Up Brain” by Barbara Strauch. Since that time—I’ve continued listening to other doctors and Functional Medical doctors speak on ‘brain health’. I didn’t - personally feel this book offered anything new—and what he did offer — many things people already know — wasn’t developed fully. I felt like Sanjay ( as bright and talented as he is)....could have written this book in a couple of months — in his sleep. Gosh... I’m sounding harsh ..... It’s not an awful book — he is even very likable- easy on the ears....but his writing - his ‘teachings’ - are very general — overly simplified. He underlines, and reinforces, things that many of us already know that are good for us. All the information in this book can be found by listening to a free podcast. Sanjay even ‘borrowed’ the SAME WORDS ....to head a chapter-heading: “Food for Thought”.....that Barbara Strauch used in a chapter in ‘her’ book. “Food For Thought”. I’d bet anything he’s read Barbara Strauch’s book....a pioneer in the study of brain health. I was expecting new data - new research - new information from over a decade ago. When in actuality - Barbara’s book was more personal and informative - more experiential and thoroughly enjoyable with a great sense of humor to boot. Both books based on scientific evidence. “Keep Sharp” is divided into parts: Part 1...The Brain: Meet Your Inner Black Box What makes you, Cognitive Redefined, Destructive Myths and the 5 pillars That Will Build You. Part 2..The Brain Trust: How Not To Loose Your Mind The Miracle of movement, The Power of Purpose, Learning, and Discovery, The Need For Sleep and Relaxation, Food For Thought, Connection For Protection, Putting It All Together. Part 3...The Diagnosis: What to do, How to Thrive Diagnosing and Treating An Ailing Brain, Navigating the Path Forward Financially and Emotionally, with a special note to Caretakers Conclusion: The Bright Furure Acknowledgments So....a few things to take away....in this outdated book: ....Exercise matters, sleep matters, socialization matters, a Mediterranean diet matters, ...What’s good for your heart is good for your brain. ....Trying new things is age preventative. ....There is truth to the words “Older and Wiser”. I would never discourage anyone from reading this book.... It’s FINE....just not GREAT... If you’re over 40 years of age, I HIGHLY recommend Barbara Strauch’s book. You get more bang for your buck.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    I love Dr. Sanjay Gupta for his intelligent science-based medical commentary on CNN, so I was excited to see if his writing was as interesting as his commentary. I was not disappointed! This book is not only informative about Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, and other well-known illnesses of the brain, but also provides tools for sharpening your brain at any age. (Youngsters, listen up! Every time I lose my car keys I wish I’d started working on this sooner.) I really enjoyed the straightforward an I love Dr. Sanjay Gupta for his intelligent science-based medical commentary on CNN, so I was excited to see if his writing was as interesting as his commentary. I was not disappointed! This book is not only informative about Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, and other well-known illnesses of the brain, but also provides tools for sharpening your brain at any age. (Youngsters, listen up! Every time I lose my car keys I wish I’d started working on this sooner.) I really enjoyed the straightforward and sometimes tough news that your memory and brain function rely as much on hard work and exercise as does the rest of your body. There is a plethora of modern and interesting information on neuroplasticity (or, the brain’s ability to change itself), the relationship of exercise and physical activity to brain health, and whether or not things like Sudoku and Lumosity can really make you smarter. (Spoiler alert: not really.) The information delivered here is science-based, but not so intricate as to be inaccessible, which is quite a trick when you are dealing with something as complex as the human brain. Dr. Gupta’s voice is as friendly, compassionate and helpful as he is on TV. An enjoyable and informative read no matter what your level of knowledge about neuroplasticity and the brain. 4.5 stars. Many thanks to Dr. Gupta, NetGalley, and Simon & Schuster for this ARC.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Michael Payne

    Move. The key takeaway here is to move more, stress your body and cells with bloodflow, circulation and the oxygen that fuels your brain. Move, move & move. Our brains are plastic: shape yours. Challenge yourself with new uncomfortable materials, new adventures, new social situations. Learn, learn, and learn. Keep going. There is little need and little good data on retirement, don't stop. Possibly work a little less, but keep working, keep engaging and have a purpose and meaning in life. You can c Move. The key takeaway here is to move more, stress your body and cells with bloodflow, circulation and the oxygen that fuels your brain. Move, move & move. Our brains are plastic: shape yours. Challenge yourself with new uncomfortable materials, new adventures, new social situations. Learn, learn, and learn. Keep going. There is little need and little good data on retirement, don't stop. Possibly work a little less, but keep working, keep engaging and have a purpose and meaning in life. You can change what your are doing, but don't stop doing. Go and go further. You are what you eat. Eat more leafy green vegetables, more colors, and less red meat, sugary and processed foods. Eat the rainbow. People matter. Participate in the world, in your community, in your neighborhood, in your family. Shut off our phone and actually talk with a friend, preferably in person. Don't wait. Dementia and Alzheimers don't start at age 70, they more likely start at age 35. What you do today will influence your future tomorrow. So get a move on it. Better, 'read' this book on audible where you can be walking as you go hearing so much more science based advice read by Sanjay himself.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte

    Oh man, where to start with this one...I was peripherally aware of Dr Gupta before reading this book, but didn’t have an opinion on him. After listening to this, I cannot fathom why it’s gotten so many positive reviews. (1) There is zero information in this book that is new or revolutionary - it is the same stuff I have been reading for free on the internet for years, and Dr Gupta himself says this info is freely available via the Alzheimer’s Association and the AARP. Exercise, eat a balanced die Oh man, where to start with this one...I was peripherally aware of Dr Gupta before reading this book, but didn’t have an opinion on him. After listening to this, I cannot fathom why it’s gotten so many positive reviews. (1) There is zero information in this book that is new or revolutionary - it is the same stuff I have been reading for free on the internet for years, and Dr Gupta himself says this info is freely available via the Alzheimer’s Association and the AARP. Exercise, eat a balanced diet, engage with your community, work your brain, maintain a healthy social life. There - I saved you 9 hours. (2) 25% of this book felt like an excuse for Dr Gupta to name drop and/or flex his overinflated ego. “When I was working in the White House,” “when I was with my good friend Matthew McConaughey,” “Oprah asked me to speak,” “I spent time with the Dalai Lama,” “when I lived with indigenous tribes in Brazil for a few days” (...can you really call it ‘living’ if it’s only 3 days?!?), “I’ve traveled to over 100 countries”, and on and on and on. Dude, we get it. Maybe he thinks that builds up his credibility, but I found it extremely off-putting and distracting from the purpose of the book. (3) The guidance he provides may be evidence-based, but his tone is pretty elitist and alienates a significant portion of people living with or at high risk of dementia. This is demonstrated by statements like “you MUST stop making excuses and find an extra hour in your day to exercise” and “I’d rather you snack on an artisanal cheese board than a plate of cheese fries”. Oh ok 🙄 There was no acknowledgement of the racial/ethnic disparities in dementia prevalence, or that Black and Hispanic populations (who have 2x and 1.5x the risk of developing dementia compared to white folks) are more likely to be low-income and less able to easily access healthy food or “make time” for exercise (or let’s say... reduce chronic stress resulting from microaggressions and systemic oppression). He does give a brief nod to the higher risk of dementia in women and LGBTQ communities, but that’s the extent of his “inclusivity”. This book may be useful for anyone who (1) doesn’t have the internet & (2) wants a physical book to flip through when they have a dementia-related question. Otherwise save yourself the money and just use the free resources online.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Candie

    I think your enjoyment of this book will depend on your current knowledge in the area. It is very well written.; it is simple to understand and is packed with a lot of very good and helpful information on a wide array of areas that effect your overall health. That said, I am very interested in this area and have read quite a bit of books and articles so although I enjoyed hearing all of this and it has helped me to up my health game after being so off track over the holidays, I don't think I rea I think your enjoyment of this book will depend on your current knowledge in the area. It is very well written.; it is simple to understand and is packed with a lot of very good and helpful information on a wide array of areas that effect your overall health. That said, I am very interested in this area and have read quite a bit of books and articles so although I enjoyed hearing all of this and it has helped me to up my health game after being so off track over the holidays, I don't think I really learned many new things that I hadn't heard before. It isn't all common sense though so if you are new to the topic, I definitely suggest giving this book a read as it packs a lot of interesting stuff into one book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    Gupta summarizes the latest scientific medical studies that have been proven to protect and improve brain function throughout one’s life. He has organized them in five major categories. They include: 1) exercise five days a week; 2) develop a sense of purpose that may include learning and discovery; 3) make sure one is getting enough sleep as sleep helps the brain to refresh itself; 4) eat nutritiously; and 5) develop strong social connections with others. Gupta discusses the increasing incidence Gupta summarizes the latest scientific medical studies that have been proven to protect and improve brain function throughout one’s life. He has organized them in five major categories. They include: 1) exercise five days a week; 2) develop a sense of purpose that may include learning and discovery; 3) make sure one is getting enough sleep as sleep helps the brain to refresh itself; 4) eat nutritiously; and 5) develop strong social connections with others. Gupta discusses the increasing incidence of dementia in older patients, particularly due to Alzheimer’s which accounts for more than half of all dementia cases. The purpose of this book is to urge people to take action now to prevent one from irrevocably developing the disease. Alzheimer’s is not inevitable, even when one may be genetically predisposed to it. There are even small actions that can make a big difference. For instance, the brain is comprised of 73% water and it takes only 2% dehydration to affect one’s attention, memory and other cognitive skills. Highly recommend.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Books about the brain and neuroscience always interest me, and Sanjay Gupta's Keep Sharp: Build a Better Brain at Any Age qualifies because, while it is written for the lay person, it is a good combination of science and easy to understand examples. Well-documented with studies that explain the way the brain works and what we can do to keep our brains in the best condition possible, the book offers good advice and suggestions to keep our minds sharp. A few excerpts and comments: "But it important Books about the brain and neuroscience always interest me, and Sanjay Gupta's Keep Sharp: Build a Better Brain at Any Age qualifies because, while it is written for the lay person, it is a good combination of science and easy to understand examples. Well-documented with studies that explain the way the brain works and what we can do to keep our brains in the best condition possible, the book offers good advice and suggestions to keep our minds sharp. A few excerpts and comments: "But it important to know that memory is fundamentally a learning process--the result of constantly interpreting and analyzing incoming information." "... your memory is not a single system--it's made up of a network of systems, each playing a different role in creating, storing, and recalling." "The brain remains plastic throughout life and can rewire itself in response to learning. It can also generate new brain cells under the right circumstances." "...exercise is the only behavioral activity scientifically proven to trigger biological effects that can help the brain." Also, "physical in activity has been calculated to be the most significant risk factor in cognitive decline and the development of dementia." The author notes that physical exercise has often been sacrificed in schools. Research shows the benefit of physical exercise on learning. (There are tons of articles out there about how physical education/activity increases academic performance.) How Physical Activity Affects School Performance Growing Evidence of Physical Activity on Academic Performance How Does Physical Activity Affect Academic Performance? There are also plenty of studies that research the affect of physical exercise on other age groups (including my own), but in addition to my own age group, I'm concerned about how taking physical education out of schools has been a mistake that has been detrimental in so many areas of child development. About brain-training videos, crossword puzzles, and Sudoku which can improve working memory in specific areas, Gupta adds that "...although they can help your brain get better at performing those specific activities, their benefits do not extend to other brain functions like reasoning and problem solving, both of which are key to building cognitive reserve." The book covers everything from to diet, exercise, learning, and more. The connections Gupta makes about how these behaviors effect the brain provides essential information. It may be common sense in many cases, but the how is important to know. Building a better brain is important for people of all ages. For children, adults, and the elderly, the book offers scientific and common sense methods to preserve and increase the brain's functions and delay cognitive decline. Excellent addition to my brain book collection. NetGalley/Simon & Schuster Brain/Neuroscience/Aging. Jan., 2020. Print length: 326 pages.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Christy Martin

    Sanjay Gupta gives a comprehensive view of all the currently known tricks and techniques to keep the brain healthy, with an emphasis on staving off the much feared dementia related illnesses. Gupta gives 5 specific goals for the reader to follow to maintain memory these include, diet, exercise, social inclusion, etc.. While Gupta's book is comprehensive on the methods of keeping good brain health unfortunately society and quarantine have made many of the suggestions difficult, if not impossible Sanjay Gupta gives a comprehensive view of all the currently known tricks and techniques to keep the brain healthy, with an emphasis on staving off the much feared dementia related illnesses. Gupta gives 5 specific goals for the reader to follow to maintain memory these include, diet, exercise, social inclusion, etc.. While Gupta's book is comprehensive on the methods of keeping good brain health unfortunately society and quarantine have made many of the suggestions difficult, if not impossible for some seniors. This book is great for those who are able and have the time, resources, and know how to maintain the diet that Gupta recommends and that have the ability with today's restrictions to socialize and volunteer their time and energy. I found Gupta's suggestions to be pretty common sense approach to mental and brain health maintenance. It is a good read but somewhat repetitious. It is obvious that their is more about the brain that we do not know than that we do know. Hopefully research, as Gupta indicates, will find the cure for the disease that many fear the most, loss of memory.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I read this as an audio book. It’s possible it works better as a traditional book. In audio form the repetitiveness of the narrative really becomes apparent. The book is almost like a bunch of magazine articles stuck together with no attempt at editing. Little new information is provided to those who have any familiarity with this subject. I am a big fan of the author, but I can’t honestly say I’d recommend this book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Joanne Kelleher

    With Baby Boomers moving into their senior years, Dr. Gupta is right on time with his "5 pillars of brain health": -Move -Discover -Relax -Nourish -Connect Some of the information I have heard before, but I enjoyed listening to Dr. Gupta's reading of the book. With Baby Boomers moving into their senior years, Dr. Gupta is right on time with his "5 pillars of brain health": -Move -Discover -Relax -Nourish -Connect Some of the information I have heard before, but I enjoyed listening to Dr. Gupta's reading of the book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Zu

    insightful and full of concrete, easy to follow action items.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Chrissy

    Damn you, Sanjay Gupta, for making me say, “my dad was right.” My dad was a neurosurgeon whose constant running joke was that all he did all day was sit around tell patients the same advice: “eat well and exercise,” as his primary advice to help improve brain/memory/spinal issues. Turns out, this advice is at the root of not just our heart and physical well being, but our brain and memory longevity as well. This audiobook, very well read by the author, is an important reminder for all of us to d Damn you, Sanjay Gupta, for making me say, “my dad was right.” My dad was a neurosurgeon whose constant running joke was that all he did all day was sit around tell patients the same advice: “eat well and exercise,” as his primary advice to help improve brain/memory/spinal issues. Turns out, this advice is at the root of not just our heart and physical well being, but our brain and memory longevity as well. This audiobook, very well read by the author, is an important reminder for all of us to do what we know we should do, not only for our bodies but our brains. Gupta’s lead-by-example approach can get annoying and preachy at times (“I personally do a triathalon every day, meditate with the Dalai Lama, and only consume a specific kind of juice I need to chew”)....... but some eye-rolling aside, I enjoyed this and think it is critical reading.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Itasca Community Library

    Beth says: Are you worried about staying mentally sharp as you age? This is a must-read book for everyone at every age! (You'll learn that the earlier you start these practices, the better.) Dr. Sanjay Gupta, neurosurgeon and medical reporter for CNN, breaks down strategies for increasing your brain health into five categories - physical movement, learning & discovery, sleep & relaxation, nutrition, and social connections. He explains the scientific research that supports his strategies in straig Beth says: Are you worried about staying mentally sharp as you age? This is a must-read book for everyone at every age! (You'll learn that the earlier you start these practices, the better.) Dr. Sanjay Gupta, neurosurgeon and medical reporter for CNN, breaks down strategies for increasing your brain health into five categories - physical movement, learning & discovery, sleep & relaxation, nutrition, and social connections. He explains the scientific research that supports his strategies in straight forward and easy to understand language. Many of his tips are things that we know we should be doing, but maybe don't make the effort or don't realize their impact on our mental and physical health. I listened to the audiobook, read by the author, which I also highly recommend, as his experience in media helps make him a great narrator.

  15. 5 out of 5

    The Conch

    The book is managing and protecting of "arguably the most enigmatic 3.3 pounds of life" - "the most complex thing we have ever discovered". As per the author, Alzheimer is considered now as type - 3 diabetes because it has been proven by research that those who are suffering from diabetes, which generally tags with cholesterol - high blood pressure - heart disease, have very high tendency to develop deadly Alzheimer and dementia. Living with these diseases is nothing but transforming human into The book is managing and protecting of "arguably the most enigmatic 3.3 pounds of life" - "the most complex thing we have ever discovered". As per the author, Alzheimer is considered now as type - 3 diabetes because it has been proven by research that those who are suffering from diabetes, which generally tags with cholesterol - high blood pressure - heart disease, have very high tendency to develop deadly Alzheimer and dementia. Living with these diseases is nothing but transforming human into a brain dead personality. This book warns us about our lifestyle, eating, sleeping, style of working and not exercising will develop "cognitive decline" through developing plaques of "beta-amyloid". Author provides several steps to prevent these diseases as there are no such cures. Author is neurosurgeon and his book is a motivator to keep our brain healthy forever.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mbgirl

    Brain health is real, yo! Anyone with a brain needs to know that there are steps to preventing the development of Alzheimer’s. And it’s most sad that most caregivers are women. They’re also more likely to develop it. Almost 2/3 of those with it in USA are women. Aaaand— women are less likely to be enrolled in Clin trials— eegads, that’s complicated. I loved his stories about learning around the world— whether with an Amazonian tribe, or in Netherlands, etc

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    I have a feeling that most people who read this book are my age or older but it seems like it should be marketed to a much younger audience. I’m a little discouraged by the drumbeat message of how dementia starts developing in the brain many years before visible symptoms occur. Nevertheless, I’ve always admired Dr. Gupta and I’ll take to heart his messages in the book to keep sharp. Good resources at the end of the book which, thankfully, I don’t need at this time.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

    I could have done without the repetition in this book, but ultimately felt like this was a worthwhile read, particularly at the end when he talked about how patients and caregivers can deal with a diagnosis. I will be recommending this book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dan Connors

    What's the secret to good, lifelong health? How can we keep our minds and bodies strong well into our golden years? This question has perplexed many humans as their fragile bodies start to break down, and many have taken to drugs, surgeries, and supplements when many of their problems could have been prevented in the first place. It's no great surprise that the advice presented in Sanjay Gupta's new book, Keep Sharp, is mostly preventative medicine, and it makes a lot of sense. In this book Gup What's the secret to good, lifelong health? How can we keep our minds and bodies strong well into our golden years? This question has perplexed many humans as their fragile bodies start to break down, and many have taken to drugs, surgeries, and supplements when many of their problems could have been prevented in the first place. It's no great surprise that the advice presented in Sanjay Gupta's new book, Keep Sharp, is mostly preventative medicine, and it makes a lot of sense. In this book Gupta stresses brain health above everything else, which he says is the key to everything. Cognitive decline is not inevitable as we age, and in some cases it may be reversible. Sanjay Gupta is an American physician, CNN contributor, prolific author and host of several documentaries as well as his own podcast, "Chasing Life." Gupta does not tout miracle cures or dubious treatments like other tv colleagues like Dr. Oz have done, and he provides plenty of references to back up his claims. (He has, however been criticized for past statements according to his Wikipedia page, and is far from perfect.) Our brains are incredible organs, made up mostly of water, weighing a mere 3 pounds, containing billions of nerve cells, and able to encode, store, retrieve, and interpret information at speeds that rival the strongest supercomputer. Rather than set from birth, our brains are constantly changing and re-wiring themselves all through life as we both learn and forget. New brain cells are generated all of the time, even in the elderly, and much of the health of our brain as we age is up to us. Dr. Gupta presents what he calls the 12 destructive myths and proceeds to debunk each of them. 1- The brain is a mystery. (Actually we know a lot about how they work.) 2- Older people are doomed to forget. (Not set in stone.) 3- Dementia is inevitable. (More common as we age, but not inevitable.) 4- You can't teach an old dog new tricks. (New cells and connections come with any learning) 5- You must master one language before learning another. 6- Memory training helps you never to forget. 7- Male and female brains differ significantly. 8- We only use 10% of our brain capacity. 9- Crossword puzzles can keep your brain young. 10- You are either left or right brained. 11- There are only five senses. (Actually 11 mentioned here including time, temperature, balance and pain.) 12- The brain is hardwired and fixed at adulthood. After debunking the destructive brain myths, the author proceeds to his five pillars of brain health, which he presents in an informative and helpful way. - Pillar #1- Move and get exercise regularly. People who stay sedentary are more likely to lose brain function. Those who move, walk, swim, dance, or exercise can keep their brains younger. He recommends 450 minutes a week, or 64 minutes a day, for best results based on the research he has seen. - Pillar #2- Keep your mind busy learning, discovering, and seeking out purpose. Doing a crossword puzzle regularly helps, but not much. People who retire early and don't use their minds much (too much screen time and passive activities) eventually lose brain functions. The older you are, the more you need daily mental challenges to keep what you have. - Pillar #3- Get plenty of sleep and relaxation. Sleep is essential for brain health, and those who are routinely sleep deprived are in danger of cognitive decline. Sleep, especially deep REM sleep, performs vital processes that clean up parts of the brain and consolidates memories. Relaxation also helps the brain to recover, and the author recommends medication and deep breathing. Too much daily stress and overstimulation can damage the brain if not followed by relaxation and stress relief. - Pillar #4- Eat a healthy diet. Diets high in sugar, caffeine, processed foods, alcohol, and saturated fats hurt not only the heart and other organs, but they hurt the brain as well. Dr. Gupta recommends something called the MIND diet that is similar to the Mediterranean diet- limited red meat, processed and fried foods, pastries and sugar, but plenty of veggies, nuts, berries, beans, whole grains, fish, chicken and olive oil. He presents a helpful mnemonic called SHARP to keep you on track. S= Slash sugar and stick to healthiest foods H= Hydrate smartly (water and tea) A= Add omega 3's, preferably from real food and not supplements R= Reduce portions, including possibly intermittent fasting P= Plan ahead and don't get stuck with foods you know aren't good for you. Pillar #5- Connect for protection. Humans are built for social connections, and when they feel lost and alone, they lose purpose and mental functioning suffers. That doesn't mean having 500 Facebook friends, it means having a circle of friends that you can reach out to and interact with in a meaningful way regularly. Dr. Gupta points to a landmark survey of men from their teens to old age that shows that good quality relationships were the biggest factor in predicting who would live longer and happier lives. The Ted Talk video on this study is very good and can be seen here. The first third of this book was the most helpful to me, especially the five pillars. The second third goes into a 12-week plan for improving the health of your brain, but I tend to avoid plans like this, although there are some helpful concrete steps that are tied to the five pillars. The final third is tailored to patients and families that are already experiencing mental decline, and it has advice specifically for them. Cognitive problems can be very mild or very severe, and in the case of diseases like Alzheimer's they rarely get any better. There is hope for most of these patients with the right treatments. The bottom line of this book is that our brains are critical to our health. This is not a book about mental and emotional health, which would be covered in a psychology book. Instead it is about the three pound organ between our ears that controls so much of our destiny. It provides much good information and advice about keeping your brain (and body) healthy and active. (Use it or lose it.) Dr. Gupta dispels some misconceptions and points us in the right behavioral direction, and that's something I wish all doctors would stress more in dealing with their patients.

  20. 4 out of 5

    TΞΞL❍CK Mith!lesh

    With the world upside down indefinitely, it can be hard to stick to what used to be normal routines or even to stay focused these days. Although researched and written well before the current global dilemma, Dr. Sanjay Gupta’s latest work strives to serve as a manual toward maintaining and improving cognitive health, from debunking common myths about aging to prescribing which social interactions and games are actually beneficial.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Hillsullivan

    Quick listen on audio. Just recemented what I knew. Which at New Years is not a bad thing.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Peng

    This book provides an introduction to the brain and cognitive decline, recommendations for improving your mental faculties over time, and what to do pre- and post-diagnosis for both patients and caregivers. Dr. Sanjay Gupta seeks to change the narrative surrounding dementia and Alzheimer's from one of doom and gloom to one of hope. The book underscores the individual's ability to make appropriate lifestyle changes since cognitive decline can begin decades before the symptoms even manifest. This bo This book provides an introduction to the brain and cognitive decline, recommendations for improving your mental faculties over time, and what to do pre- and post-diagnosis for both patients and caregivers. Dr. Sanjay Gupta seeks to change the narrative surrounding dementia and Alzheimer's from one of doom and gloom to one of hope. The book underscores the individual's ability to make appropriate lifestyle changes since cognitive decline can begin decades before the symptoms even manifest. This book has debunked some of my long-held myths surrounding cognitive decline and updated my knowledge on health and biology (I had forgotten how much I enjoyed Biology in high school until I read this book!). It also contains informative statistics and helpful references for those interested to access more resources on this topic. For those who are already health-conscious (exercising regularly, eating well and sleeping well) and are somewhat social and active learners, this book presents no fancy new tips or tricks. However, the information in the book would still serve as a strong reminder and will provide a strong dose of motivation for those who have been putting fitness and nutrition in the backburner.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gail

    I read Dr. Gupta's book with great interest and inspiration. My mother was a victim of Alzheimer's disease and we lost her at a relatively young age of 75. I wanted to know what research has uncovered recently and what are some things we can do to stave off dementia symptoms and possibly Alzheimer's. If we take care of ourselves, beginning in our youth , we hopefully will live longer and thrive. While living to a ripe old age sounds wonderful, we still need to be proactive in our own personal he I read Dr. Gupta's book with great interest and inspiration. My mother was a victim of Alzheimer's disease and we lost her at a relatively young age of 75. I wanted to know what research has uncovered recently and what are some things we can do to stave off dementia symptoms and possibly Alzheimer's. If we take care of ourselves, beginning in our youth , we hopefully will live longer and thrive. While living to a ripe old age sounds wonderful, we still need to be proactive in our own personal health and well-being. This book has some wonderful recommendations to help stave off dementia, many of which I thankfully already subscribe to. This book is not a scare tactic. To the contrary it brings hope and empowerment to each individual to look into themselves to protect their brain health. If I live to 95 and forget a few things here and there, I consider my endeavors a success! Thank you Dr. Gupta for this enlightened book!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rob Saunders

    Reasonable and helpful advice from a trusted source. Surprisingly well-written, the book is straight forward and nicely laid out. It is a comprehensive reference for present health and potential future brain health concerns. The book concludes with a self-help approach to healthy life-style change. A family member ordered this book months before it came out and, when it was released, she read it immediately. I dipped into it to read the doctor's thoughts on the subject of sleep and ended up read Reasonable and helpful advice from a trusted source. Surprisingly well-written, the book is straight forward and nicely laid out. It is a comprehensive reference for present health and potential future brain health concerns. The book concludes with a self-help approach to healthy life-style change. A family member ordered this book months before it came out and, when it was released, she read it immediately. I dipped into it to read the doctor's thoughts on the subject of sleep and ended up reading the entire book. Quite fascinating. I like to receive advise from my occasional doctor visits that is both straight and intuitive. Dr. Gupta here is direct. In a discussion about the effects of bad eating habits he writes, "What you should do immediately, however, is stop the external attack on your brain. Reducing intake of sugar and artificially sweetened beverages, fast food meals, processed meats, highly salted foods, and sweets is no longer a gentle suggestion; it is a mandate." He then continues with practical reminder about how to shop, "the best foods don't come with nutritional labels...they [are] real foods you find around the perimeter of a grocery store." Further on, the discussion includes charts about which foods are, or are not, apt to harbor pesticide residue. Good stuff. The book is well-sourced, yet nicely balanced with personal anecdotes. Like the practical and popular Dr. Spock baby books of previous generations, the reader will find this book useful as a daily and future reference.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dennis

    This a a book about, you guessed it, about what you can do to prevent the decline of your brain. But I felt like it was more than that, it’s not about only your brain but in this book the writer tries to give you a guide against depression and to help you sleep better so you can perform better when its most needed, he gives you a ton of advise with one thing in mind, not only to keep your brain healthy, but your heart, your brain, everything we need to stay healthy and he includes a twelve weeks This a a book about, you guessed it, about what you can do to prevent the decline of your brain. But I felt like it was more than that, it’s not about only your brain but in this book the writer tries to give you a guide against depression and to help you sleep better so you can perform better when its most needed, he gives you a ton of advise with one thing in mind, not only to keep your brain healthy, but your heart, your brain, everything we need to stay healthy and he includes a twelve weeks program to get you started. I think this book might be an important one to read for just about anybody as I feel we can all use a reminder why we should take care of our bodies and our minds so I think this book was written exceptionally well, it tells you why it can be beneficial to do something and after it shows you how you could do it therefore i’d give this one a 5/5.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ginger Bensman

    I listened to Keep Sharp:Build a Better Brain at Any Age on Audible. It's an engaging and easy to understand discussion about what's currently known about brain health, brain disease (particularly dementia), but most importantly, it gives concrete suggestions and strategies to help the reader protect and maintain a sharp and functioning brain throughout life. It's an important book. I'm going to encourage my family and friends to read it. I listened to Keep Sharp:Build a Better Brain at Any Age on Audible. It's an engaging and easy to understand discussion about what's currently known about brain health, brain disease (particularly dementia), but most importantly, it gives concrete suggestions and strategies to help the reader protect and maintain a sharp and functioning brain throughout life. It's an important book. I'm going to encourage my family and friends to read it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    This is a very informative look at the subject of how to ward off dementia. His writing is excellent and entertaining as well. If you are concerned about staying as sharp as possible into your old age, I'd say this is the book for you. This is a very informative look at the subject of how to ward off dementia. His writing is excellent and entertaining as well. If you are concerned about staying as sharp as possible into your old age, I'd say this is the book for you.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kathy McC

    Well written, extremely informative, and highly enlightening. There is also a inexpensive companion workbook that helps the reader condense the most important facts and suggestions.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Great info on brain health. Good to know genetics only plays a small part in dementia and Alzheimer's risk and that taking care of yourself in being in good overall health helps your brain too! Great info on brain health. Good to know genetics only plays a small part in dementia and Alzheimer's risk and that taking care of yourself in being in good overall health helps your brain too!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Phyllis

    Highly recommend.

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