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30 review for Great American Baseball Card Flipping, Trading and Bubble Gum Book

  1. 4 out of 5

    Spiros

    Is there any human endeavour that lends itself to irreverence more than Major League Baseball? One of my own all time favorite players, San Francisco's own, the Pride of Hercules, Mr. Willie McGee, always endeared himself to my by the manner in which he approached the batter's box: his head lost somewhere inside his switch hitter's helmet, standing in as if he wasn't entirely sure he wanted to be there, his expression indicated something akin to naked terror. This body language belied McGee's ab Is there any human endeavour that lends itself to irreverence more than Major League Baseball? One of my own all time favorite players, San Francisco's own, the Pride of Hercules, Mr. Willie McGee, always endeared himself to my by the manner in which he approached the batter's box: his head lost somewhere inside his switch hitter's helmet, standing in as if he wasn't entirely sure he wanted to be there, his expression indicated something akin to naked terror. This body language belied McGee's ability to send an inordinate number of liners up the middle and into gaps. Boyd & Harris have produced a wonderful box of valentines to their favorite ballplayers, the vast majority of whom played before I was aware of them as players.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    Alternately reverential and hilarious, this is one of the best books on baseball I have ever read. If you collected baseball cards, are a baseball fan or want to read some of the funniest writing about the game, I highly recommend it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bill Davidson

    "Coot" Veal? "Cot" Deal? Hilarious -- I've read this over and over again. "Coot" Veal? "Cot" Deal? Hilarious -- I've read this over and over again.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Joe Noir

    You don't have to be a baseball fan, or a card collector. This is one of the funniest books I've ever read. You don't have to be a baseball fan, or a card collector. This is one of the funniest books I've ever read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brian Dempsey

    I loved this book as a kid, and have read it multiple other times in my life. Each time different passages strike me in new ways because I have changed, while the words have not. The authors walk the tightrope between reverence and irreverence throughout; never forgetting that their heroes are people while some “commons” are heroic in their own way. The close observation of the details of so many cards and players tell a story of joy and—at times bewilderment at what the people at Topps were thi I loved this book as a kid, and have read it multiple other times in my life. Each time different passages strike me in new ways because I have changed, while the words have not. The authors walk the tightrope between reverence and irreverence throughout; never forgetting that their heroes are people while some “commons” are heroic in their own way. The close observation of the details of so many cards and players tell a story of joy and—at times bewilderment at what the people at Topps were thinking. It is easy to know about Willie Mays and Mickey Mantle, but Boyd and Harris introduced me to the likes of Sam Jones and Don Mossi (who happens to be alive and well in his early 90s now!) and I will be forever grateful.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    As a long time fan of snarky baseball blogs like Fire Joe Morgan and Deadspin, I've been wanting to read this cult classic for a long time. I finally found it at Bart's Books in Ojai. It was well-written and laugh-out-loud funny at times, but after a while I had trouble with all the Baby Boomer childhood references and the dozens of variations of describing how bad a player was. As a long time fan of snarky baseball blogs like Fire Joe Morgan and Deadspin, I've been wanting to read this cult classic for a long time. I finally found it at Bart's Books in Ojai. It was well-written and laugh-out-loud funny at times, but after a while I had trouble with all the Baby Boomer childhood references and the dozens of variations of describing how bad a player was.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chuck

    Read it first time in the 1980’s. Even better this time, great and funny observations about baseball players from the 1950’s, most of whom were not great players. I remember many of the cards in the book and have many still today

  8. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    Another re-reading of a classic. Great memories and generally witty commentary on the cards before expansion. Most of it holds up quite well. Highly recommended if your first card (like me) was Mel Roach.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Chuck

    If you love the game of baseball, then this book is for. But if have memories of collecting baseball cards then all of your memories will rushing back!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Schultz

    one of my all time favorites books, about an all consuming hobby when I was a kid....

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jim Blessing

    I bought a first edition of this book in 1973. I have read it several times and it still brings a smile to my face.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ethan

    Probably a wonderful trip down memory lane if you were really into baseball in the fifties. Otherwise, just a bunch of fairly amusing observations and anecdotes.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Edward Young

    after reading over 100,000 books, mostly older ones (no great shakes after 30 years in the book business - most editors read twice that much) i can confidently say that this is, quite simply, the greatest book of ANY kind ever written on ANY subject. i find boyd and harris's take on life, in specific passages, and in its encompassing appraisal of a nation and of an era, to be unique in the world of letters. i use verbal constructions, entire memorized biographies (Hector Lopez? Earl Torgeson? Roc after reading over 100,000 books, mostly older ones (no great shakes after 30 years in the book business - most editors read twice that much) i can confidently say that this is, quite simply, the greatest book of ANY kind ever written on ANY subject. i find boyd and harris's take on life, in specific passages, and in its encompassing appraisal of a nation and of an era, to be unique in the world of letters. i use verbal constructions, entire memorized biographies (Hector Lopez? Earl Torgeson? Rocky Bridges?) and their way of thinking almost daily. wherever they may now be ~ fellas, you hit a GRAND SLAM with this masterpiece. an annual read~

  14. 5 out of 5

    Gavin Rich

    Probably the greatest, and funniest book ever written. A way of life for me ever since I first read it at age 11, and eminently quotable, "Jesus McFarlane was a living testimonial, on the other hand, that naming your son after a famous celebrity doesn't help. [your baseball career]," "you knew the Yankees pitching staff had hit rock bottom when Eli Grba managed to slither his way into their starting rotation," "Who the hell is Cuno Barrigan, and why are they are they saying such terrible things Probably the greatest, and funniest book ever written. A way of life for me ever since I first read it at age 11, and eminently quotable, "Jesus McFarlane was a living testimonial, on the other hand, that naming your son after a famous celebrity doesn't help. [your baseball career]," "you knew the Yankees pitching staff had hit rock bottom when Eli Grba managed to slither his way into their starting rotation," "Who the hell is Cuno Barrigan, and why are they are they saying such terrible things about him." I couldn't recommend a book highly enough.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rich Williams

    Equal parts nostalgia, irreverence, and fun. I now know why this book has such a cult following. It also makes me appreciate my mom for not throwing out my baseball cards.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bill Peschel

    This is a timeless classic. I've returned to this one over the years and still find it a refreshing evocation of two boys' love of baseball in the 1950s and 1960s. Evocative, sometimes heart-tugging (in a good way), and if you lived through those times as I did (at least in the latter part of the '60s), seeing the cards you used to collect will give you that frisson of excitement (and regret, if you gave them away long ago). This is a timeless classic. I've returned to this one over the years and still find it a refreshing evocation of two boys' love of baseball in the 1950s and 1960s. Evocative, sometimes heart-tugging (in a good way), and if you lived through those times as I did (at least in the latter part of the '60s), seeing the cards you used to collect will give you that frisson of excitement (and regret, if you gave them away long ago).

  17. 4 out of 5

    Glenn

    I've had this book in a drawer for years, finally pulled it out and couldn't put it down. Great stories about stars, semi-stars and the all too plentiful commons. Based on my own ample collection I know there are many more cards and stories out there, so many that we need a sequel. if not 2-3 more books that need to be written. Get started Brendan C. Boyd and Fred C. Harris :-) I've had this book in a drawer for years, finally pulled it out and couldn't put it down. Great stories about stars, semi-stars and the all too plentiful commons. Based on my own ample collection I know there are many more cards and stories out there, so many that we need a sequel. if not 2-3 more books that need to be written. Get started Brendan C. Boyd and Fred C. Harris :-)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ian Mullet

    two wags go through their old baseball card collections with commentary both hilarious and poignant. the pictures are all there, too! sadly it's out-of-print. eben lasker has my copy of it, so if you're in the boston area hit him up for it. were i to indulge my man-crush on pat neshek [http://eteamz.active.com/PatNeshek/], with this book i would court and woo him... two wags go through their old baseball card collections with commentary both hilarious and poignant. the pictures are all there, too! sadly it's out-of-print. eben lasker has my copy of it, so if you're in the boston area hit him up for it. were i to indulge my man-crush on pat neshek [http://eteamz.active.com/PatNeshek/], with this book i would court and woo him...

  19. 5 out of 5

    Adam Arnold

    Brendan Boyd really knows baseball and really knows cards. He's also really funny. Other reviews say that his humor is mean. That's true. It was also written in a different era when skins were a little thicker. Regardless, Boyd's love and mastery of the material brings the images on the cards to life. Brendan Boyd really knows baseball and really knows cards. He's also really funny. Other reviews say that his humor is mean. That's true. It was also written in a different era when skins were a little thicker. Regardless, Boyd's love and mastery of the material brings the images on the cards to life.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    I found this relic of a book at Kobey's Swap Meet. Whether you collect baseball cards or are jsut a fan, this book is a fun reading and I'm glad I found it. Surely it's worth more than the 50 cents I paid. I found this relic of a book at Kobey's Swap Meet. Whether you collect baseball cards or are jsut a fan, this book is a fun reading and I'm glad I found it. Surely it's worth more than the 50 cents I paid.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Brook Zelcer

    One of the great(and unheralded) baseball books of all time. Don't be put off by the title. Imaginative, colorful, nostalgic. A real beauty. One of the great(and unheralded) baseball books of all time. Don't be put off by the title. Imaginative, colorful, nostalgic. A real beauty.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

    Nostalgic musings on collecting baseball cards, complete with hilarious bios of old-timey baseball players. One of my favourite books growing up.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Brian Schnack

    A random book of nuggets from 1950s childhood, told as asides under random baseball cards. Read 'Cardboard Heroes' instead if you're not a boomer. A random book of nuggets from 1950s childhood, told as asides under random baseball cards. Read 'Cardboard Heroes' instead if you're not a boomer.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brw2024

    Best baseball card book ever written...if you grew up playing with cards in any fashion or form.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jay

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jon

  27. 4 out of 5

    Eric

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ed

  29. 5 out of 5

    Scott Fendley

  30. 4 out of 5

    Joe Desmond

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