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Arnould's Law of Marine Insurance and Average

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The new 17th edition of Arnould affirms its place among the classics of British maritime law literature and as the established practitioner work on the law of marine insurance and average. It offers in-depth commentary on the principles of marine insurance in forming contracts, the reasons why contracts are rendered void, and issues arising out of loss. The 17th edition in The new 17th edition of Arnould affirms its place among the classics of British maritime law literature and as the established practitioner work on the law of marine insurance and average. It offers in-depth commentary on the principles of marine insurance in forming contracts, the reasons why contracts are rendered void, and issues arising out of loss. The 17th edition includes a large amount of the case material generated since the supplement of 1997 across the whole range of maritime law. It also includes coverage of new code material and of the documents of marine insurance that have undergone important recent changes. The Appendices will be updated to incorporate key statutory materials, including some key new Institute Clauses and the new York-Antwerp Rules. Caselaw developments since 1997 to be included encompass most, if not all, of the law of marine insurance. Key cases include: The Star Sea (2001), The Kastor Too (2004), HIH v. Chase (2003), Thor v. Ingos (2005), Mersc-Skandia v. Lloyd's (2001), and Friends Provident v. Sirius (2005). The appendix contains up-to-date primary materials reflecting statutory changes since the last edition and its supplement. These include: - Selected Institute Clauses, which supplement the Marine Insurance Act of 1906 - The York Antwerp Rules 2004 - Rules of Practice, which go with the York Antwerp Rules


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The new 17th edition of Arnould affirms its place among the classics of British maritime law literature and as the established practitioner work on the law of marine insurance and average. It offers in-depth commentary on the principles of marine insurance in forming contracts, the reasons why contracts are rendered void, and issues arising out of loss. The 17th edition in The new 17th edition of Arnould affirms its place among the classics of British maritime law literature and as the established practitioner work on the law of marine insurance and average. It offers in-depth commentary on the principles of marine insurance in forming contracts, the reasons why contracts are rendered void, and issues arising out of loss. The 17th edition includes a large amount of the case material generated since the supplement of 1997 across the whole range of maritime law. It also includes coverage of new code material and of the documents of marine insurance that have undergone important recent changes. The Appendices will be updated to incorporate key statutory materials, including some key new Institute Clauses and the new York-Antwerp Rules. Caselaw developments since 1997 to be included encompass most, if not all, of the law of marine insurance. Key cases include: The Star Sea (2001), The Kastor Too (2004), HIH v. Chase (2003), Thor v. Ingos (2005), Mersc-Skandia v. Lloyd's (2001), and Friends Provident v. Sirius (2005). The appendix contains up-to-date primary materials reflecting statutory changes since the last edition and its supplement. These include: - Selected Institute Clauses, which supplement the Marine Insurance Act of 1906 - The York Antwerp Rules 2004 - Rules of Practice, which go with the York Antwerp Rules

16 review for Arnould's Law of Marine Insurance and Average

  1. 4 out of 5

    Phillip Taylor

    160 YEARS OF INSURANCE DELIBERATION DEFINED A review by Phillip Taylor MBE, Barrister-at-Law, Richmond Green Chambers Jonathan Gilman and his colleagues have returned to the year of revolutions (1848) when Joseph Arnould began his authoritative interpretation of the law and practice of marine insurance, and they have given us our new guiding beacon for British shipping laws in 21st century. This much anticipated 17th edition is now a complete, authoritative and interpretative work on the law and pr 160 YEARS OF INSURANCE DELIBERATION DEFINED A review by Phillip Taylor MBE, Barrister-at-Law, Richmond Green Chambers Jonathan Gilman and his colleagues have returned to the year of revolutions (1848) when Joseph Arnould began his authoritative interpretation of the law and practice of marine insurance, and they have given us our new guiding beacon for British shipping laws in 21st century. This much anticipated 17th edition is now a complete, authoritative and interpretative work on the law and practice of marine insurance and stands out as the outstanding and only main statement of specialist law which is the common law in its area. A BEACON WITH UNRIVALLED EXPERTISE There is admirable, detailed coverage throughout with a plethora of new material, and five new chapters covering the following: jurisdiction and applicable law; the pre-contractual duty of utmost good faith for general principles; then the post-contractual duty on fraudulent claims; double insurance and contribution; and reinsurance. “Arnould” has retained and sheds light as a shrewd commentary with seasoned advice on how the law is interpreted in practical situations including: • Offers a complete and authoritative interpretation of the law and practice surrounding marine insurance; • Includes in-depth analytical commentary and analysis on the principles of marine insurance; • Incorporates the vast sea of new case law since the previous edition; • Covers the formation and contents of marine insurance policies; • Examines in detail the matters which affect validity of cover; • Discusses the Institute Clauses in current use; • Offers in-depth analysis of the various marine and was perils; and • Presents historical insight from previous editions extending back over 150 years. The work has been written by a high-profile team of maritime law specialists from Essex Court Chambers, with Julian Cooke of 20 Essex Street and Professor Rob Merkin. Of particular use is the incorporation of a vast sea of new case law and an in-depth analytical commentary and analysis on the principles of marine insurance. I liked the seasoned expertise on contracts and policies which covers their formation and contents. It also gives a detailed examination of the matters which affect the validity of cover, a discussion of Institute Clauses currently used, and an in-depth analysis of the various marine and war perils. “Arnould” now has 31 chapters in 1800 pages (of delicate paper so beware of tears), and there are 4 appendices plus a first-class index which saves a great deal of time once you get use to it. Gilman & Merkin sought to maintain a balance with this new edition, preserving the essential character and style of “this classic treatise” as it has been handed down as the common law tradition requires, whilst updating the text to take account of new developments and making it more accessible to the user. They have done this well in what is a very technical and concentrated area maintaining the authoritative text with the least tampering even though substantial changes have been made again this time. With frank and candid understatement, this edition is now the work of a team of editors to cover substantial new case law (781 of them here) with the pruning of apparently obsolete or redundant material which is always a difficult selection to make. The two senior editors pay tribute to “the ability, care and valuable new insights” of the team and they have made the key materials accessible in one volume. One hundred years ago we had the Marine Insurance Act in 1906 which codified the old cases. We now have so many substantial and varied formal types of rules of such a different character which we have to take into account. Yet, “Arnould” has kept the historic perspective well to make this work the only full statement of law here…and it works, although Gilman & Merkin have no illusions that the next edition may, again be very different to this one: it is the beacon of marine insurance law.

  2. 5 out of 5

    V.F. Castillian

  3. 4 out of 5

    Pham Thanh

  4. 4 out of 5

    Manoj Varrier

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kuedyyn

  6. 5 out of 5

    Joeng In

  7. 4 out of 5

    Aiswarya

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nenad Stojanovic

  9. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  10. 5 out of 5

    Aristeidis Papaioannou

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mike Solo

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nayera Walid

  13. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Cook

  14. 5 out of 5

    Av.Tuzer

  15. 5 out of 5

    Pham Thanh

  16. 4 out of 5

    Guillermo Diaz

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