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Carl Jung - Dreams and Philosophy (Biography)

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Carl Jung - Dreams and Philosophy is the biography of Carl Jung, a Swiss psychiatrist, influential thinker, and founder of analytical psychology. Jung's unique and broadly influential approach to psychology has emphasized understanding the psyche through exploring the worlds of dreams, art, mythology, world religion and philosophy. Although he was a theoretical psychologis Carl Jung - Dreams and Philosophy is the biography of Carl Jung, a Swiss psychiatrist, influential thinker, and founder of analytical psychology. Jung's unique and broadly influential approach to psychology has emphasized understanding the psyche through exploring the worlds of dreams, art, mythology, world religion and philosophy. Although he was a theoretical psychologist and practicing clinician for most of his life, much of his life's work was spent exploring other realms, including Eastern and Western philosophy, alchemy, astrology, sociology, as well as literature and the arts. Jung emphasized the importance of balance and harmony. Carl Jung - Dreams and Philosophy is highly recommended for those interested in reading more about this respected Swiss psychiatrist.


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Carl Jung - Dreams and Philosophy is the biography of Carl Jung, a Swiss psychiatrist, influential thinker, and founder of analytical psychology. Jung's unique and broadly influential approach to psychology has emphasized understanding the psyche through exploring the worlds of dreams, art, mythology, world religion and philosophy. Although he was a theoretical psychologis Carl Jung - Dreams and Philosophy is the biography of Carl Jung, a Swiss psychiatrist, influential thinker, and founder of analytical psychology. Jung's unique and broadly influential approach to psychology has emphasized understanding the psyche through exploring the worlds of dreams, art, mythology, world religion and philosophy. Although he was a theoretical psychologist and practicing clinician for most of his life, much of his life's work was spent exploring other realms, including Eastern and Western philosophy, alchemy, astrology, sociology, as well as literature and the arts. Jung emphasized the importance of balance and harmony. Carl Jung - Dreams and Philosophy is highly recommended for those interested in reading more about this respected Swiss psychiatrist.

30 review for Carl Jung - Dreams and Philosophy (Biography)

  1. 5 out of 5

    CoolBreeze1978

    This book "Carl Jung-Dreams and Philosophy" is not a book. It's large-font, 25-page, poorly written high school book report about the background of Carl Jung. There are no discussions of Jung's psychological theories, how they relate to philsophy, or even a paragraph concerning psychology or philosophy at all. Not informative or enjoyable--this read is a complete waste of time.

  2. 5 out of 5

    C C

    For the past few weeks I have been leading a weekly seminar called the Covid 19 Great Books Discussion. Anyone and everyone is welcome to join us. The texts we read are challenging pieces. College seminar stuff. Great minds speaking to the ages in elegant, lofty, and dense prose. It started out as a dorky way to pass the time. A way to keep our minds sharp. A way to talk about life that doesn't feel so direct and raw. I invited friends and family and invited them to invite their friends and fami For the past few weeks I have been leading a weekly seminar called the Covid 19 Great Books Discussion. Anyone and everyone is welcome to join us. The texts we read are challenging pieces. College seminar stuff. Great minds speaking to the ages in elegant, lofty, and dense prose. It started out as a dorky way to pass the time. A way to keep our minds sharp. A way to talk about life that doesn't feel so direct and raw. I invited friends and family and invited them to invite their friends and family. The first week read Emerson's Self-Reliance. The second week we read Carl Jung's The Stages of Life. This week we're reading Bill McKibben's the End of Nature. What I appreciate most, what's setting my aflame, is how everything I have been reading over a two week period has saliently coalesced around the idea of the overall moral superiority of what Jung called the "natural man" and Daniel Quinn called the "Leavers," what scholars would call indigenous, what woke hipsters would call first peoples and what Tommy Orange would call Indians. Regardless of what they are called, they live a pre-Neolithic way of life as hunter-gatherers. Jung says people like that live instinct, and Emerson believed "instinct" is the true source of self-reliance and wisdom. All four authors agree that profound occurred when one faction of mankind traded living off the land for the security of the plowed field. Daniel Quinn calls the humans who adopted agriculture (most of us) the Takers and the people who remained hunter-gatherers the "Leavers." He says the difference between two groups is simple. The takers believe the world was created for us. The leavers believe they were created for the world. He says the story of Adam and Eve eating from the Tree of Knowledge from the Garden of Eden is a metaphor for the moment the Takers adopted the myth that they know right from wrong, the moment they "Took" life and death into their own hands, while the Leavers are those who put their lives in the hands of the Gods. “The premise of the Taker story is 'the world belongs to man'. … The premise of the Leaver story is 'man belongs to the world'.” For the Takers, agriculture is the beginning of mankind's ascent. For the Leavers, agriculture marks the downfall. By the way, the entire novel is a socratic dialogue between a Gorilla and a writer. Jung too points to Genesis. He sees he decision to eat from the Tree of Knowledge as the "sacrifice of the merely natural man." The natural man is "unconscious" and concerned with "overt happenings" i.e. staying alive in the natural world. While the civilized man is wracked with "problems" i.e. anxiety about who we are and where we belong in the world and whether or not we should buy a vacation home in Vermont. "The biblical fall of man presents the dawn of consciousness as a curse." Emerson also disdains the civilized world, reserving his scorn for "society." We have cut ourselves off from the source of all truth, "nature" and "instinct." McKibben thinks we have actually ended nature. Ended it. Destroyed it, not with pollution, but with genetic engineering. Once mankind is creating nature, it is no longer nature, but a product, a commodity that can be bought and sold. The price of this trade-off is that we have killed the "idea of nature." To paraphrase McKibben, why does a rabbit or a cloud matter if either one can be as easily manufactured as a can of coke? If God is dead, it's because we killed him. Tommy Orange comes at from a different angle with his novel, "There There." Emerson, Jung, and McKibben write about the world from the Taker perspective. But Tommy Orange writes from the native American perspective, i.e. the Leaver perspective. Well, to be more precise, he writes from the perspective of someone who descends from a Leaver culture that has been forced to adopt the Taker. Who forced them? The white man, of course. His novel takes place in Oakland, CA. Through his character sketches of 12 native Americans we see the scars of a people whose history and culture and bodies were mutilated and humiliated. We see what identify confusion and historical memory look in the flesh. We inhabit their consciousnesses and live in their skin and well, walk a mile in their moccasins. And it hurts to be them. We white folks are the malevolent zookeepers of history. The native first people indigenous folks are like Ishmael: brilliant, wise, insightful, and imprisoned. Caged up in cities, penned up in reservations, cloistered in casinos, left only with their faint memories of a better way.

  3. 4 out of 5

    James

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lydia

  5. 4 out of 5

    Calvin Hopkins

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kathi Loser

  7. 5 out of 5

    Martin

  8. 4 out of 5

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  9. 5 out of 5

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  10. 5 out of 5

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  11. 4 out of 5

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  12. 4 out of 5

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  13. 5 out of 5

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  14. 4 out of 5

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  15. 4 out of 5

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  16. 4 out of 5

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  17. 4 out of 5

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  18. 4 out of 5

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  19. 5 out of 5

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  20. 5 out of 5

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  21. 4 out of 5

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  22. 5 out of 5

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  23. 4 out of 5

    Mostly Book Reviews

  24. 4 out of 5

    Khosrov Alexander

  25. 4 out of 5

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  26. 4 out of 5

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  27. 5 out of 5

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  28. 5 out of 5

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  29. 4 out of 5

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  30. 4 out of 5

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