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Noir: A Collection of Crime Comics

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The biggest names in comics crime fiction assemble here for an anthology of original tales of murder and deceit, presented in black and white! Aided and abetted by some of the most gifted slatherers of thick, black India ink in the field, this gang is headed straight for the bad parts of town, and you're invited along for the ride!


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The biggest names in comics crime fiction assemble here for an anthology of original tales of murder and deceit, presented in black and white! Aided and abetted by some of the most gifted slatherers of thick, black India ink in the field, this gang is headed straight for the bad parts of town, and you're invited along for the ride!

30 review for Noir: A Collection of Crime Comics

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cathleen

    1 1/2 stars. A disappointment in multiple ways. The entries are so brief that the classic noir elements aren't given room to develop or to surprise. These are more vignettes than stories, and only a few have something fresh or original to offer. A collection of noir by definition will exploit seedy elements, but the first story of abduction and rape was a lot to confront as an opening experience. Categorizing it as noir, even modern noir, is a stretch. One of the appeals of any anthology is the 1 1/2 stars. A disappointment in multiple ways. The entries are so brief that the classic noir elements aren't given room to develop or to surprise. These are more vignettes than stories, and only a few have something fresh or original to offer. A collection of noir by definition will exploit seedy elements, but the first story of abduction and rape was a lot to confront as an opening experience. Categorizing it as noir, even modern noir, is a stretch. One of the appeals of any anthology is the opportunity to discover new-to-you talents and then explore their work, but the only art or narratives I admired were those of existing favorites Jeff Lemire, Rick Geary, Fábio Moon, and Gabriel Bá. At least I could enjoy new pieces by them. Keeping all the art in black-and-white had impact, though some illustrators used it more effectively than others. The collection as a whole seems such a missed opportunity.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    I had hoped for more with this collection...I'm a big fan of classic noir and at first glance, this looked impressive. Unfortunately, it didn't quite meet my expectations. This is not to say that some of the stories aren't good--there are a few that I really liked. However, as a collection, I think it fell short. Some of the stories are just too predictable, and some don't quite meet the characteristics of "classic noir." The artwork is varied, lending itself to story in some selections, and I had hoped for more with this collection...I'm a big fan of classic noir and at first glance, this looked impressive. Unfortunately, it didn't quite meet my expectations. This is not to say that some of the stories aren't good--there are a few that I really liked. However, as a collection, I think it fell short. Some of the stories are just too predictable, and some don't quite meet the characteristics of "classic noir." The artwork is varied, lending itself to story in some selections, and taking away from it in others. Overall, I was hoping to like this more than I did; it was ok, but not great...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alicia Riley

    It was okay book just disappoint with most of the stories.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    This is an anthology of crime comics by some of the best writers and artists working in the comics field today. Like most anthologies it's got some good stories and some poor ones but I think it's a pretty decent roundup of crime noir and an enjoyable, if brief, read. "Stray Bullets" creator David Lapham contributes the story of a kidnapped girl stuffed into a box "to be raped later" by a couple of teenage nutcases, only it ends with the boys being tricked by the girl and their own stupidity. This is an anthology of crime comics by some of the best writers and artists working in the comics field today. Like most anthologies it's got some good stories and some poor ones but I think it's a pretty decent roundup of crime noir and an enjoyable, if brief, read. "Stray Bullets" creator David Lapham contributes the story of a kidnapped girl stuffed into a box "to be raped later" by a couple of teenage nutcases, only it ends with the boys being tricked by the girl and their own stupidity. Jeff Lemire contributes a story that feels like it came straight from the 50s and the pen of Jim Thompson with the story of an elderly farmer in need of cash being visited by a bank robber with a bag full of money and a body full of bullets. Rick Geary tells the story of jealous love, a man hires a private investigator to follow his wife and see if she's cheating on him. And then he hires an assassin, but somehow it all goes wrong. No anthology of noir would be complete without the current masters of noir comics weighing in and Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips contribute a short story from their amazing "Criminal" series called "21st Century Love" and manages to pack so much intrigue and story into a few short pages. This was definitely the highlight of the book and showed why Brubaker & Phillips are so successful. There's a Twilight Zone-esque tale of an out of shape housewife going to the gym to tone up and winding up with a new husband. I won't say anyone but it's kind of bizarre and was the only story here that I don't think was exactly "noir" but was still entertaining nonetheless. The story is "The New Me" by Gary Philips and Eduardo Barreto. Finally Brian Azzarello teams up with artists Fabio Moon and Gabriel Ba to tell what seems to be a mundane crime story until the reveal on the final page. "The Bad Night" is a prelude to the origin story of Bruce Wayne. There were other stories in this collection but I decided to only highlight the ones I thought were any good. It's a good collection and certainly lives up to the title of "Noir". Crime comics fans will enjoy it and it's fun enough for casual comics fans to get into.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Orrin Grey

    Like pretty much any anthology, this one's a mixed bag, but it's mostly pretty good. I picked it up for the Gabriel Bá/Fabio Moon/Brian Azzarello story, which was pretty great, though I wonder how it'd play to someone unfamiliar with the mythology of Batman (if there is such a person).

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    A collection of noir short stories. However, the best of the stories were just okay, while the majority were either puzzling or pointless. Even the stories by otherwise reliable authors (such as Ed Brubaker) were disappointing.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bobby

    Probably a 2.5 rating, but I always round up. The artwork was closer to the feeling of noir than the writing in most of these. You could see the endings to most of these stories coming a mile away. In a sense a lot of these felt more "Tales from the Crypt" than noir.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Z

    Some okay. Some bad. The last is the only one of any worth. Oh, and if you are looking for noir, it isnt here. Some okay. Some bad. The last is the only one of any worth. Oh, and if you are looking for noir, it isn’t here.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Moore

    Great collection of short stories by some great writers and drawers.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Simon Pressinger

    There are some thrilling stories in this collection. The artwork of Dean Motter and M.K. Perker stood out for me especially. I've enjoyed Motter's work on the character Mister X and Perker's collaboration with G. Willow Wilson on their excellent series 'Air'. One of the strips I read was really interesting and strangely moving in it's absence of dialogue. It plays with the reader's perspective and it's called 'Fracture' by Alex De Campi, who also, incidentally, was the director of the most There are some thrilling stories in this collection. The artwork of Dean Motter and M.K. Perker stood out for me especially. I've enjoyed Motter's work on the character Mister X and Perker's collaboration with G. Willow Wilson on their excellent series 'Air'. One of the strips I read was really interesting and strangely moving in it's absence of dialogue. It plays with the reader's perspective and it's called 'Fracture' by Alex De Campi, who also, incidentally, was the director of the most popular video on Youtube back in the Dark Age of 2007. I like the black and white noir aesthetic and the sensational stories that unravel, almost invariably in urban areas. Someone's always owing someone money, someone's a psychopath, the underdog either gets his way or is thwarted in the attempt. There's blood and martinis and cigarettes. There's so much sex and inexplicable violence. There's the unashamedly macabre and sometimes there's just plain, unadulterated cynicism. It's a feast. I'm new to noir, so I'm well aware the seasoned pundit is like, 'Well, duh,' right now. But my god, I haven't seen so much misogynistic content in one anthology since, well, ever. There are so many dubious morals to draw from certain of these pieces. And the collection was first published as late as 2009, too! For all it's faults, which I don't think are worth getting into for the purposes of keeping in with the timeless spirit of latter-day pulp noir, I enjoyed it, and the collection is very eclectic, which is great. I want more. If anyone knows of some good noir for the 21st century, let's chat.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth (Miss Eliza)

    You'd think a collection featuring Brubaker, Phillips, and Geary would have come to my attention sooner, but now that I've read it I can see why it didn't, also why it's out of print. Gathering some of the "great" comic writers to explore Noir I'd at least expect it to reach the level of mediocrity, but instead, aside from a few, meaning three, passable stories, they just straight up suck. There's no playing with the Noir medium, instead they all go for the pitfalls of typical Noir, focusing on You'd think a collection featuring Brubaker, Phillips, and Geary would have come to my attention sooner, but now that I've read it I can see why it didn't, also why it's out of print. Gathering some of the "great" comic writers to explore Noir I'd at least expect it to reach the level of mediocrity, but instead, aside from a few, meaning three, passable stories, they just straight up suck. There's no playing with the Noir medium, instead they all go for the pitfalls of typical Noir, focusing on sexual abuse, untrustworthy women, and death. There's nothing new here, just the same old tropes made almost more explicit and exploitative with the same written patter that anyone could imitate. And as for the prose piece? WTF this is a graphic novel. I would have forgiven this lapse if it had been well written, but it wasn't. The only piece I thought was a little clever was the very last one with a little twist on the Batman origin story... but it was too little too late to save this collection of murder and rape.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Karina

    My favorite stories were "Open the Goddamn Box," "Trustworthy," and "Lady's Choice."

  13. 5 out of 5

    Joey

    The art was almost uniformly fantastic. The stories were too bleak for me so I wouldn't recommend this one.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Summers

    I read only the first four stories in this collection. The first story is ridiculous, the second story is uninteresting, and the third and fourth stories are confusing.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Frances

    Pleasantly surprised; I was coming to this with expectations of both quality and convention. Quality was met. Convention was met and exceeded. There are a three science fiction stories, and now that I think about it, that's not unheard of; consider the Great Whatsit from Kiss Me Deadly. A similar (not identical!) story could have been told without the gadget in question in each case, but they worked well and even when I wasn't surprised by the ending (which is not a reflection on the story; just, Pleasantly surprised; I was coming to this with expectations of both quality and convention. Quality was met. Convention was met and exceeded. There are a three science fiction stories, and now that I think about it, that's not unheard of; consider the Great Whatsit from Kiss Me Deadly. A similar (not identical!) story could have been told without the gadget in question in each case, but they worked well and even when I wasn't surprised by the ending (which is not a reflection on the story; just, honestly, halfway through a noir anthology a double-cross becomes less of a surprise) I was enjoying them. And plan to look up more Mister X stories--I mean, psychetecture with horrible effects on the city's inhabitants, an epidemic of sleep disorders, the once-shining Radiant City now named Somnopolis? I'll be over at the bookshelf. One of the stories struck me as a bit of a stretch--not that it was implausible, but that I wasn't sure the narrator could rely on events unfolding as comfortably as they did. ETA: That one story was David Lapham's, and now I have read the other Stray Bullets stories, and I understand. Oh, god, I understand. The rest were solid, ranging from simple slice-of-life in a mean-streeted city to more heavily plotted stories of what I'm going to call depravity, combining crime and murder and the occasional twisted thing (and I'm going to wrap this up before I end up with a third Mike Hammer reference). Pretty sure one of them recast Batman's origin story, which made me grin a bit. Overall; solidly enjoyable, veering into damn good on occasion. Graphic novels tend to be a really fast read, and at 116 pages I would recommend reading before buying if you're budgeting either cash or shelf space, but I would definitely recommend reading.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    I wasn't sure what to expect when I first began reading this collection of graphic short stories. There are thirteen stories in all, each of them dark and gritty. And I loved just about every one. The first story left me stunned. The second, about a man with an ill wife who is about to lose his farm, is probably my favorite. It was called "The Silo" and was written and drawn by Jeff Lemire. Another one of my favorites was called "The Albanian" by M.K. Perker about an immigrant janitor who I wasn't sure what to expect when I first began reading this collection of graphic short stories. There are thirteen stories in all, each of them dark and gritty. And I loved just about every one. The first story left me stunned. The second, about a man with an ill wife who is about to lose his farm, is probably my favorite. It was called "The Silo" and was written and drawn by Jeff Lemire. Another one of my favorites was called "The Albanian" by M.K. Perker about an immigrant janitor who stumbles upon a murder-suicide in the office building where he works. I had to read the story called "Fracture" by Alex de Campi, Hugo Petras, and Clem Robbins twice because I hadn't realized the first time there was a special way to read it. The author and artist were quite creative with the set up of the story. I think it is pretty ingenious now that I better understand what they were aiming to do. My experience with crime fiction short stories is hit and miss. Too often I find that characterization is sacrificed in the name of plot. Although I have read crime fiction graphic novels before, this was my first experience reading crime fiction shorts in graphic form. I was really impressed with how well done each of the stories were. So much is said within each pane and so few words are needed to get the entire story across (except in one case which was a short story, "Trustworthy" by Ken Lizzi and Joëlle Jones, written in words with a few art drawings to go along with it). I think readers of noir and who don't mind a lot of grit in their crime fiction should give Noir: A Collection of Crime Comics a try.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Roybot

    Noir: A Collection of Crime Comics is a very thin volume of short crime stories, written by a variety of authors, well known and less well known. As with many anthologies, the results here are a mixed bag. While several of the tales here are pretty traditional pulp stories, most of them add some kind of spin to the genre, for better or worse. Unfortunately, in too many of these tales, the twists and tropes are very easily spotted. A number of the stories contained within have a strong Noir: A Collection of Crime Comics is a very thin volume of short crime stories, written by a variety of authors, well known and less well known. As with many anthologies, the results here are a mixed bag. While several of the tales here are pretty traditional pulp stories, most of them add some kind of spin to the genre, for better or worse. Unfortunately, in too many of these tales, the twists and tropes are very easily spotted. A number of the stories contained within have a strong science-fiction bent, which isn't bad, but was decidedly not what I was looking for or expecting from a book called Noir. The end result is a book of stories that are readable, but ultimately forgettable. While the stories are generally all pretty middle of the road, the artwork is a more varied; with so many different visual styles involved, there's almost bound to be at least one that works for a particular reader. Of course, that also means there's almost certainly a story or two that just don't work. While this is far from the worst crime comic I've picked up, there's not very much to recommend this. If you're looking for noir or crime comics, there's a lot better fare out there than this.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    This graphic novel is really great. It's collection of short stories about different types of crimes. Some of the stories are really interesting while some are just decent or okay. This book has some big names contributors too. Ed Brubaker, Brian Azzarello,Jeff Lemire, and Paul Grist to name a few. Brubaker bring his Criminal series to the collection with a 21th century tale. A tale that fits really well with his other Criminal comics. This story is a must read. Azzarello tells an interesting This graphic novel is really great. It's collection of short stories about different types of crimes. Some of the stories are really interesting while some are just decent or okay. This book has some big names contributors too. Ed Brubaker, Brian Azzarello,Jeff Lemire, and Paul Grist to name a few. Brubaker bring his Criminal series to the collection with a 21th century tale. A tale that fits really well with his other Criminal comics. This story is a must read. Azzarello tells an interesting tale. An excellent written and plotted, but if I explain would give away too much. It's a must read for anyone who likes his works. Jeff Lemire brings a great story here too. A story of moral choices that will make you question where you would act differently. Over all this graphic novel was a good read. There were some stories that were boring and not that interesting, but you will run across that with any anthology. There's enough good stuff that you should check it out and skip over stuff you don't like. Plus most stories are only six pages long. So they're all short stories.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Bukk

    The best thing about this collection is the illustrations. The thing about comics/graphic novels, or any books that rely heavily on art is that even if the writing isn't that good, they're fun to look at. This applies to the Noir collection of crime comics. The stories are so short there's really no point in hoping for much. I love short stories, since they're the pivotal proving ground of all writers, as well as the means for a writer to be both prolific in ideas and to flex the entirety of The best thing about this collection is the illustrations. The thing about comics/graphic novels, or any books that rely heavily on art is that even if the writing isn't that good, they're fun to look at. This applies to the Noir collection of crime comics. The stories are so short there's really no point in hoping for much. I love short stories, since they're the pivotal proving ground of all writers, as well as the means for a writer to be both prolific in ideas and to flex the entirety of their muscles as artists. But these stories are pretty much flash fiction written to give a punch. Problem is, most don't do that. Most of these, aside from the art, are anticlimactic or predictable, with little to no payoff. A handful of them are good, with a swift setup, delivery, and exit. But too many seem like something the writers threw together specifically for this collection, just wanting to be included so their 'brand' could have yet another avenue of exposure. Since each short is written and illustrated by new authors/artists, it's a good mix of writing and visuals. It's a cool mix-up to see new styles every few pages. But the writers really seemed to be lazy for the most part.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Meghan Wilson

    This is a wonderful collection of short Noir crime type stories by various authors and illustrators. Some are better than others but all succeed in creating that noir "mood". All of the stories have that sinister, yet cocky, mysterious and somehow abrupt, smoky, slow feeling that is essential in anything claiming to be Noir. Even the titles stayed true to the genre "The Albanian," "The Last HIt," "Ladies Choice". And the art was supurb....some of it would normally not appeal to me, but it all This is a wonderful collection of short Noir crime type stories by various authors and illustrators. Some are better than others but all succeed in creating that noir "mood". All of the stories have that sinister, yet cocky, mysterious and somehow abrupt, smoky, slow feeling that is essential in anything claiming to be Noir. Even the titles stayed true to the genre "The Albanian," "The Last HIt," "Ladies Choice". And the art was supurb....some of it would normally not appeal to me, but it all fit within its own story. An amazing little bit by Azzarello with Gabriel Ba and Fabio Moon (so so good, the best talent in art right now) on inks at the very end with just the right amount of nondisclosure to make you go "aha!" at the end. A very short read unfortunately, most stories are under 10 pages but well worth it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Eric Piotrowski

    Like most collections of stories, this is a hit-and-miss batch. The first and last stories are clearly the standouts, and the worst sin of the least among them is mere confusion. There are some interesting experiments here, along with a few tired deadweights. The art varies, of course, but in general it's solid. It's all black-and-white, with (naturally) heavy on the black. Still, the artists tend to avoid the trap of overdoing it with the grim imagery. (They generally let the story do the Like most collections of stories, this is a hit-and-miss batch. The first and last stories are clearly the standouts, and the worst sin of the least among them is mere confusion. There are some interesting experiments here, along with a few tired deadweights. The art varies, of course, but in general it's solid. It's all black-and-white, with (naturally) heavy on the black. Still, the artists tend to avoid the trap of overdoing it with the grim imagery. (They generally let the story do the shading.) I was happy to see pieces from Brian Azzarello and Ed Brubaker. There's not much else to say, except I wish it were longer. (115 pages feels a little slim; each story is only 5-8 pages.) It's worth reading, but best to borrow it from a library.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jason Seaver

    Over a dozen 6-10 page stories in here, all in beautiful black and white (even the Brubaker/Phillips "Criminal" tale, which Marvel usually publishes in color) and not a dud among them. Some have a science-fiction slant, like Dean Motter's "Mr. X" tale, but most are just straight-ahead good crime. I am kind of surprised that DC's legal department hasn't had words with Dark Horse over the Azzerello/Ba/Moon tale which ends the book, but it's good enough that I'm glad they got away with it. The Over a dozen 6-10 page stories in here, all in beautiful black and white (even the Brubaker/Phillips "Criminal" tale, which Marvel usually publishes in color) and not a dud among them. Some have a science-fiction slant, like Dean Motter's "Mr. X" tale, but most are just straight-ahead good crime. I am kind of surprised that DC's legal department hasn't had words with Dark Horse over the Azzerello/Ba/Moon tale which ends the book, but it's good enough that I'm glad they got away with it. The highlight for me has to be the story that starts the book off, David Lapham's first new "Stray Bullets" story in what must be at [i:]least[/i:] five years, ten pages that makes it seem like he never left. Here's hoping that he can get back to it soon.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    I like a lot of these artists and writers. I also love Noir. However, I was not into this book. It was mostly a chore for me to read. Most of it was just obsessed with the Noir twist, than with good artwork or writing. I liked the Jeff Lemire piece. That was the most surprising as it used his meditative, quiet style and gave it a dark, violent, subtle twist. I was also a fan of the Fillbach brothers Wim Wenders-esque story. And the final gag-oriented story, The Bad Night. Those are the stories I like a lot of these artists and writers. I also love Noir. However, I was not into this book. It was mostly a chore for me to read. Most of it was just obsessed with the Noir twist, than with good artwork or writing. I liked the Jeff Lemire piece. That was the most surprising as it used his meditative, quiet style and gave it a dark, violent, subtle twist. I was also a fan of the Fillbach brothers Wim Wenders-esque story. And the final gag-oriented story, The Bad Night. Those are the stories that got it the three stars. The others, not so much. There was one other good piece, but I don't know who wrote it and I returned the book to the library. Crap. It's about a husband that hires a killer to kill his wife, things do not go well, and it has a hilarious ending.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I found this a mixed bag of stories with some good some bad. Most seemed to prefer the twist/shock ending where you think you have everything figured out until... The art styles vary widely. Most favor either what I think of as more indie art style or the more realistic style. Hugo Petreus' art really stuck out in a bad way for me. I really liked "21st Century Noir", Ed Brubaker & Sean Phillips' Criminal story and "Trustworthy" by Ken Lizzi and Joelle Jones. What surprised me was how I much I found this a mixed bag of stories with some good some bad. Most seemed to prefer the twist/shock ending where you think you have everything figured out until... The art styles vary widely. Most favor either what I think of as more indie art style or the more realistic style. Hugo Petreus' art really stuck out in a bad way for me. I really liked "21st Century Noir", Ed Brubaker & Sean Phillips' Criminal story and "Trustworthy" by Ken Lizzi and Joelle Jones. What surprised me was how I much I loved Brian Azzarello's "Bad Night" -- it handled the twist very cleverly -- it seems like an simple crime setup on the surface until/unless you start to recognize the pop culture reference, a nice nod to the superhero fans.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

    Some really good stuff from some names you'll know and some you won't. Ken Lizzi, M.K. Perker, Alex De Campi, Chris Offut, and Dean Motter's contributions were my favorites with Motter's and De Campi's stories really standing out. Motter giving a succinct but intriguiging glimpse into Mister X (definitely gonna take a look at this now; I especially appreciated the R.U.R shoutout). De Campi, mixing up reality and imagination and neuroses to paint a convincing portrait of psychological pain, Some really good stuff from some names you'll know and some you won't. Ken Lizzi, M.K. Perker, Alex De Campi, Chris Offut, and Dean Motter's contributions were my favorites with Motter's and De Campi's stories really standing out. Motter giving a succinct but intriguiging glimpse into Mister X (definitely gonna take a look at this now; I especially appreciated the R.U.R shoutout). De Campi, mixing up reality and imagination and neuroses to paint a convincing portrait of psychological pain, madness, and loneliness. Brubaker and Azzarello are of course on their game too, with an outtake from Brubaker's Criminal series and Azzarello's Bad Night.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Mann

    Very little "NOIR" in here, might have been less of a letdown if The Publisher had used more brain cells to title it appropriately. A mixed bag of several genres. Honestly a few of the stories had very confusing "payoffs" in that i am not sure what happened exactly. Re-reads made the convoluted story-telling no less clearer. If you can look past the bad execution by a few of the creators (the "Batman Origin" re-spin being borderline insulting), there are still worthwhile mini-epics from Dave Very little "NOIR" in here, might have been less of a letdown if The Publisher had used more brain cells to title it appropriately. A mixed bag of several genres. Honestly a few of the stories had very confusing "payoffs" in that i am not sure what happened exactly. Re-reads made the convoluted story-telling no less clearer. If you can look past the bad execution by a few of the creators (the "Batman Origin" re-spin being borderline insulting), there are still worthwhile mini-epics from Dave Lapham & Brubaker/Phillips.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    This was a nice anthology of graphic crime fiction from some of yesterday's and today's authors. I recognized most of the names in this collection, even if I don't regularly collect their comics or read their fiction. Every voice was unique, strong and gritty. I especially liked the first and last two stories. The Box story really blew me away. I have been meaning to pick up more of the the crime comics that are out there (Criminal, 100 Bullets, etc.). This little appetizer might be just want I This was a nice anthology of graphic crime fiction from some of yesterday's and today's authors. I recognized most of the names in this collection, even if I don't regularly collect their comics or read their fiction. Every voice was unique, strong and gritty. I especially liked the first and last two stories. The Box story really blew me away. I have been meaning to pick up more of the the crime comics that are out there (Criminal, 100 Bullets, etc.). This little appetizer might be just want I needed to take the plunge.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    The first and the final entries of this graphic novel compilation were the best. While there were a few good ones in between, I was disappointed that many seemed to be beginning on the final page of their stories. Overall, for just an hour or so's reading, there's a lot of great hard-boiled style, little twists, and nice artwork. A nice way to spend time waiting for your significant other to wake up on Thanksgiving morning.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Frank Taranto

    Definitely for adults. The first story by David Lapham was sick, but well told and illustrated. The Ancient Silo by Jeff Lemire was a good tale about an old farmer, his sick wife and their financial difficulties. The Last Hit written by Chris Offut and Illustrated by Kano and Stefano Gaudino was also well done, a hit man can never just walk away. Others I really liked were The New me by Gary Phillips, illustrated by Edward Barreto and Criminal: 21st Century Noir by Ed Bruba

  30. 4 out of 5

    J

    Half are great and half are weak with obvious plots, tissue thin characters, and passable artwork. It seemed like a lot of the writers thought it was noir just to write about crime and put in a twist, but noir is really a mood and an evocation, not just shadowy panels and dames with obscure motives. Many feel like snippets of a bigger whole but the few pieces that sing really go to town. Lime I said about six or so on here that really get what noir means.

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