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Allies Against the Rising Sun: The United States, the British Nations, and the Defeat of Imperial Japan

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In the annals of World War II, the role of America's British allies in the Pacific Theater has been largely ignored. Nicholas Sarantakes now revisits this seldom-studied chapter to depict the delicate dance among uneasy partners in their fight against Japan, offering the most detailed assessment ever published of the U.S. alliance with Great Britain, Australia, New Zealand In the annals of World War II, the role of America's British allies in the Pacific Theater has been largely ignored. Nicholas Sarantakes now revisits this seldom-studied chapter to depict the delicate dance among uneasy partners in their fight against Japan, offering the most detailed assessment ever published of the U.S. alliance with Great Britain, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada Sarantakes examines Britain's motivations for participating in the invasion of Japan, the roles envisioned by its Commonwealth nations, and the United States' decision to accept their participation. He shows how the interests of all allies were served by maintaining the coalition, even in the face of disputes between nations, between civilian and military leaders, and between individual services-and that allied participation, despite its diplomatic importance, limited the efficiency of final operations against Japan. Sarantakes describes how Churchill favored British-led operations to revive the colonial empire, while his generals argued that Britain would be further marginalized if it didn't fight alongside the United States in the assault on Japan's home islands. Meanwhile, Commonwealth partners, preoccupied with their own security concerns, saw an opportunity to support the mother country in service of their own separatist ambitions. And even though the United States called the shots, it welcomed allies to share the predicted casualties of an invasion. Sarantakes takes readers into the halls of both civil and military power in all five nations to show how policies and actions were debated, contested, and resolved. He not only describes the participation of major heads of state but also brings in lesser-known Commonwealth figures, plus a cast of military leaders including General of the Army Douglas MacArthur and Fleet Admiral Chester Nimitz on the American side and Admiral of the Fleet Sir Andrew Cunningham and Field Marshal Sir Alan Brooke on the British. He also paints vivid scenes of battle, including the attack of the British Pacific Fleet on Japan and ground fighting on Okinawa. Deftly blending diplomatic, political, and military history encompassing naval, air, and land forces, Sarantakes's work reveals behind-the-scenes political factors in warfare alliances and explains why the Anglo-America coalition survived World War II when it had collapsed after World War I.


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In the annals of World War II, the role of America's British allies in the Pacific Theater has been largely ignored. Nicholas Sarantakes now revisits this seldom-studied chapter to depict the delicate dance among uneasy partners in their fight against Japan, offering the most detailed assessment ever published of the U.S. alliance with Great Britain, Australia, New Zealand In the annals of World War II, the role of America's British allies in the Pacific Theater has been largely ignored. Nicholas Sarantakes now revisits this seldom-studied chapter to depict the delicate dance among uneasy partners in their fight against Japan, offering the most detailed assessment ever published of the U.S. alliance with Great Britain, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada Sarantakes examines Britain's motivations for participating in the invasion of Japan, the roles envisioned by its Commonwealth nations, and the United States' decision to accept their participation. He shows how the interests of all allies were served by maintaining the coalition, even in the face of disputes between nations, between civilian and military leaders, and between individual services-and that allied participation, despite its diplomatic importance, limited the efficiency of final operations against Japan. Sarantakes describes how Churchill favored British-led operations to revive the colonial empire, while his generals argued that Britain would be further marginalized if it didn't fight alongside the United States in the assault on Japan's home islands. Meanwhile, Commonwealth partners, preoccupied with their own security concerns, saw an opportunity to support the mother country in service of their own separatist ambitions. And even though the United States called the shots, it welcomed allies to share the predicted casualties of an invasion. Sarantakes takes readers into the halls of both civil and military power in all five nations to show how policies and actions were debated, contested, and resolved. He not only describes the participation of major heads of state but also brings in lesser-known Commonwealth figures, plus a cast of military leaders including General of the Army Douglas MacArthur and Fleet Admiral Chester Nimitz on the American side and Admiral of the Fleet Sir Andrew Cunningham and Field Marshal Sir Alan Brooke on the British. He also paints vivid scenes of battle, including the attack of the British Pacific Fleet on Japan and ground fighting on Okinawa. Deftly blending diplomatic, political, and military history encompassing naval, air, and land forces, Sarantakes's work reveals behind-the-scenes political factors in warfare alliances and explains why the Anglo-America coalition survived World War II when it had collapsed after World War I.

30 review for Allies Against the Rising Sun: The United States, the British Nations, and the Defeat of Imperial Japan

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nishant Pappireddi

    A good account of the politics of British Commonwealth efforts to play a part in the final defeat of Japan.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Fredrick Danysh

    This is a look at the military commanders of of the United States and the British empire who worked together [most of the time] to defeat the Japanese in the Pacific during World War II. It presents a picture of their lives, personalities, goals, and leadership styles in an interesting new light. This is a good read for the World War II buff.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Graham

    Primarily focused on the British, as one might expect, but could use a bit more on the US side. Still very interesting. Has some very good historiographical notes. Sarantakes doesn't think much of the wartime Australian government. Primarily focused on the British, as one might expect, but could use a bit more on the US side. Still very interesting. Has some very good historiographical notes. Sarantakes doesn't think much of the wartime Australian government.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ross Mahoney

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Evan Sarantakes

  6. 4 out of 5

    Han Wos

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ron Bailey

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shrike58

  9. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sean

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tim Taylor

  12. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tia

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tom Kurtz

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jerome

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nolundi

  17. 4 out of 5

    Robert Scrivner

  18. 4 out of 5

    Robyn Sanchez

  19. 5 out of 5

    James

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jon Klug

  21. 4 out of 5

    Christine Furre

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alfred Odeh

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Pieri

  25. 5 out of 5

    Caleb Karges

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ben

  27. 4 out of 5

    Muhammad Asif Salam

  28. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Dambro

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dan

  30. 5 out of 5

    Eric

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