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Game Six: Cincinnati, Boston, and the 1975 World Series: The Triumph of America's Pastime

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Boston, Tuesday, October 21, 1975. The Red Sox and the Cincinnati Reds have endured an excruciating three-day rain delay. Tonight, at last, they will play Game Six of the World Series. Leading three games to two, Cincinnati hopes to win it all; Boston is desperate to stay alive. But for all the anticipation, nobody could have predicted what a classic it would turn out to b Boston, Tuesday, October 21, 1975. The Red Sox and the Cincinnati Reds have endured an excruciating three-day rain delay. Tonight, at last, they will play Game Six of the World Series. Leading three games to two, Cincinnati hopes to win it all; Boston is desperate to stay alive. But for all the anticipation, nobody could have predicted what a classic it would turn out to be: an extra-innings thriller, created by one of the Big Red Machine's patented comebacks and the Red Sox's improbable late-inning rally; clutch hitting, heart-stopping defensive plays, and more twists and turns than a Grand Prix circuit, climaxed by one of the most famous home runs in baseball history that ended it in the twelfth. Here are all the inside stories of some of that era's biggest names in sports: Johnny Bench, Luis Tiant, Sparky Anderson, Pete Rose, Carl Yastrzemski--eight Hall of Famers in all--as well as sportscasters and network execs, cameramen, umpires, groundskeepers, politicians, and fans who gathered in Fenway that extraordinary night. Game Six is an unprecedented behind-the-scenes look at what is considered by many to be the greatest baseball game ever played--remarkable also because it was about so much more than just balls and strikes. This World Series marked the end of an era; baseball's reserve clause was about to be struck down, giving way to the birth of free agency, a watershed moment that changed American sports forever. In bestselling author Mark Frost's talented hands, the historical significance of Game Six becomes every bit as engrossing as its compelling human drama.


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Boston, Tuesday, October 21, 1975. The Red Sox and the Cincinnati Reds have endured an excruciating three-day rain delay. Tonight, at last, they will play Game Six of the World Series. Leading three games to two, Cincinnati hopes to win it all; Boston is desperate to stay alive. But for all the anticipation, nobody could have predicted what a classic it would turn out to b Boston, Tuesday, October 21, 1975. The Red Sox and the Cincinnati Reds have endured an excruciating three-day rain delay. Tonight, at last, they will play Game Six of the World Series. Leading three games to two, Cincinnati hopes to win it all; Boston is desperate to stay alive. But for all the anticipation, nobody could have predicted what a classic it would turn out to be: an extra-innings thriller, created by one of the Big Red Machine's patented comebacks and the Red Sox's improbable late-inning rally; clutch hitting, heart-stopping defensive plays, and more twists and turns than a Grand Prix circuit, climaxed by one of the most famous home runs in baseball history that ended it in the twelfth. Here are all the inside stories of some of that era's biggest names in sports: Johnny Bench, Luis Tiant, Sparky Anderson, Pete Rose, Carl Yastrzemski--eight Hall of Famers in all--as well as sportscasters and network execs, cameramen, umpires, groundskeepers, politicians, and fans who gathered in Fenway that extraordinary night. Game Six is an unprecedented behind-the-scenes look at what is considered by many to be the greatest baseball game ever played--remarkable also because it was about so much more than just balls and strikes. This World Series marked the end of an era; baseball's reserve clause was about to be struck down, giving way to the birth of free agency, a watershed moment that changed American sports forever. In bestselling author Mark Frost's talented hands, the historical significance of Game Six becomes every bit as engrossing as its compelling human drama.

30 review for Game Six: Cincinnati, Boston, and the 1975 World Series: The Triumph of America's Pastime

  1. 4 out of 5

    Louis

    I doubted that a good-sized book was necessary to tell the story of Game 6 of the 1975 World Series even though it was a great game still fondly remembered by baseball fans almost a half-century later. Fortunately Frost's storytelling skills makes this long-ago game come alive. He provides backstories for both managers and many of the players, In particular, I enjoyed learning more about the great Red Sox pitcher Luis Tiant, who started Game 6. There are weaknesses, in particular Frost's decisio I doubted that a good-sized book was necessary to tell the story of Game 6 of the 1975 World Series even though it was a great game still fondly remembered by baseball fans almost a half-century later. Fortunately Frost's storytelling skills makes this long-ago game come alive. He provides backstories for both managers and many of the players, In particular, I enjoyed learning more about the great Red Sox pitcher Luis Tiant, who started Game 6. There are weaknesses, in particular Frost's decision to not interview anyone connected to this game. Also, there are no endnotes or explanation of the works he used to put the book together. At the same time, his afterward goes on far too long. These complaints do not detract from the narrative when it gets rolling, much like a Pete Rose headfirst slide, to its dramatic conclusion. A wonderful book for any baseball fan.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jim Spicer

    As a life long diehard Cincinnati Reds fan and a baseball lover, I thoroughly enjoyed this detailed look at the 1975 World Series, specifically focused on Game Six. This is highly regarded as one of the best World Series games ever and World Series ever and Frost does a masterful job of not only retelling the events of the game ... inning by inning ... pitch by pitch. But even though you know the ending (of both the game and the series) he takes the reader on an adventure packed with anecdotal s As a life long diehard Cincinnati Reds fan and a baseball lover, I thoroughly enjoyed this detailed look at the 1975 World Series, specifically focused on Game Six. This is highly regarded as one of the best World Series games ever and World Series ever and Frost does a masterful job of not only retelling the events of the game ... inning by inning ... pitch by pitch. But even though you know the ending (of both the game and the series) he takes the reader on an adventure packed with anecdotal story after story.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jay

    Imagine a new television network that is set up to cover baseball games, but instead of focusing on the game itself, like typical broadcasts, it focuses a level above, on the game, but also on the main broadcast, and with immediate access to the history related to the action and the players, the broadcasters, the managers, and the owners. And with full knowledge of the outcome, the stories could be planned and scheduled in order to match the action in the game and heighten the drama. This book i Imagine a new television network that is set up to cover baseball games, but instead of focusing on the game itself, like typical broadcasts, it focuses a level above, on the game, but also on the main broadcast, and with immediate access to the history related to the action and the players, the broadcasters, the managers, and the owners. And with full knowledge of the outcome, the stories could be planned and scheduled in order to match the action in the game and heighten the drama. This book is in a way a depiction of such coverage – it’s a meta-coverage of a game compared to what we are used to seeing on TV. The book is put together to track the game and it plays out in the same way as a game is usually broadcast, with a meta-play-by-play description of the action of this one game throughout the book, and a meta-color commentary intermixed with the play-by-play that goes beyond the color commentary of a typical baseball broadcast. For example, you might read a couple of lines of detail about a pitch, where it was placed, how long the batter stepped out of the box and adjusted his hat before the pitch – that level of detail. Then you might read a page or two of back-history of the batter, or the catcher, or some other player related to the play. And so on throughout the game. It’s like time stands still for this description, and the play-by-play and the color commentary are fully integrated and expanded to tell complete stories. This was extremely well done – you feel like you are watching the game in a kind of suspended animation in order to learn more about it, and you really feel you know the players after the game is done. I would have given the book 5 stars, except for the very long afterward. The author spends more than 50 pages in the afterward describing the remaining careers of the players, managers, coaches, and broadcasters of the game, including a lot on the changes in the reserve clause that created free agency. What I really noticed in the afterward was an overwhelming number of opinions about players and events, much of it negative. I didn’t notice this kind of opinionating during the game description, but here it just comes across as pompous. And while the game description had a little repetitiveness, the author managed it well there. In the afterward, the author covers the same players careers immediately after the game, in the next year, in the next two or three years, and to retirement, a kind of sequential chunking of follow-up. There was a lot of repetitiveness in the way it was written. Had the afterward been written in the same way as the game description, or maybe even omitted, this would have easily been the best baseball book I’ve read in a long time. As it is, it is still pretty good. I suggest skimming the afterwards, though.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tung

    With this book, Frost joins Fyodor Dostoevsky, John Updike, and Robert Olen Butler as my favorite authors of all time. In Game Six, Frost recounts the sixth game of the 1975 World Series between the Cincinnati Reds (led by a Hall of Fame line-up of Pete Rose, Joe Morgan, and Johnny Bench) and the Boston Red Sox (and their Hall of Fame roster of Yaz and Carlton Fisk) -- universally considered one of if not the greatest World Series game(s) of all time. Frost jumps between telling the history of b With this book, Frost joins Fyodor Dostoevsky, John Updike, and Robert Olen Butler as my favorite authors of all time. In Game Six, Frost recounts the sixth game of the 1975 World Series between the Cincinnati Reds (led by a Hall of Fame line-up of Pete Rose, Joe Morgan, and Johnny Bench) and the Boston Red Sox (and their Hall of Fame roster of Yaz and Carlton Fisk) -- universally considered one of if not the greatest World Series game(s) of all time. Frost jumps between telling the history of baseball and the histories of each member of the Reds and Red Sox, and a pitch-by-pitch accounting of Game Six. And while doing this, he accomplishes the ideal of every good nonfiction sports writer: he makes the sports parts incredibly exciting, and makes the personal history parts incredibly engaging. Every at-bat comes off as epic, and every player bio comes off as real and unique. Frost is especially successful in framing the book through the eyes and words of two primary protagonists: Reds Manager Sparky Anderson and Red Sox starting pitcher Luis Tiant. Through both men's lives and perspectives we see the beauty of human drama reflected through the lens of sports. If you don't shed tears as Frost recounts Tiant's reunion with his father and the moment they share at the World Series, you aren't human. A friend of mine who is a huge baseball fan told me that Game Six was the most exciting baseball game he has ever watched. I haven't seen a replay of the game, but after reading this book, game six is the most exciting baseball game I've ever experienced; Frost's book is that successful. If I had the power to determine the writing future of every living author, I would have Frost write accounts of every epic and defining moment in sports, from the Miracle on Ice to the Rumble in the Jungle. (I would also end the careers of John Grisham and Stephanie Meyers, but I digress). Simply put, Game Six is my second favorite non-fiction book ever, and one of my favorite books ever period. An exceptional read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tom Gase

    A great read about possibly the greatest game ever played in the greatest sport I know. It's weird, but after I read "Game Six's" author Mark Frost's "The Greatest Game Ever Played" about a year ago, I wondered if he could describe a baseball game the same way he wrote about the 1913 U.S. Open in that book. The answer--a definite yes. On the first page, Frost dedicates the book to Vin Scully, the Hall-of-Fame announcer for the Los Angeles Dodgers. Reading this book felt like I was watching Game A great read about possibly the greatest game ever played in the greatest sport I know. It's weird, but after I read "Game Six's" author Mark Frost's "The Greatest Game Ever Played" about a year ago, I wondered if he could describe a baseball game the same way he wrote about the 1913 U.S. Open in that book. The answer--a definite yes. On the first page, Frost dedicates the book to Vin Scully, the Hall-of-Fame announcer for the Los Angeles Dodgers. Reading this book felt like I was watching Game Six live, but with Scully announcing. A true masterpiece, Frost doesn't just talk about heroes Carlton Fisk and Bernie Carbo, he talks about ALL the players, but doesn't ever stray too far off from the game, which was the problem in Lew Paper's recent book, "Perfect" about Don Larsen in 1956. I had almost forgot about the great Dwight Evans catch but Frost describes it perfectly. I also loved the last 50 pages or so when Frost talked about what happened to all the players that competed in the game. I was thrilled to learn that Bernie Carbo is doing okay now. I also never realized that Evans had more home runs in the 1980's than any baseball player in the AL. Good trivia question for later. And wow, I can't believe how loaded the Boston Globe's sportswriters were in 1975--Peter Gammons, Leigh Montville, Lesley Vesser, Bob Ryan, etc. In the end, this is a must read, and I can't wait for Frost to come out with another book. Well done.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jackson

    Another winner from Mark Frost, particularly if you love baseball. He writes about baseball with the same engaging and vivid prose that we have come to expect from his earlier portraits of golfing icons Francis Ouimet and Bobby Jones. In addition to going into fantastic detail on the famed Game Six of the 1975 series, he also dives into the history of both the Reds and the Red Sox, the history of the World Series, and the history of baseball itself. He also tackles such contemporary issues as fr Another winner from Mark Frost, particularly if you love baseball. He writes about baseball with the same engaging and vivid prose that we have come to expect from his earlier portraits of golfing icons Francis Ouimet and Bobby Jones. In addition to going into fantastic detail on the famed Game Six of the 1975 series, he also dives into the history of both the Reds and the Red Sox, the history of the World Series, and the history of baseball itself. He also tackles such contemporary issues as free agency with a keen critic's eye. One knock on this book is that the character sketches are not as enduring as those of his golfing masterpieces, but that is because he tries to give background of each player, instead of focusing on a few central figures to develop throughout the work. One wonders if he tries to do too much. Still, the work is great and the last 100 pages–the so-called afterword–is itself worth the price of admission.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Andy Miller

    This book focuses on game six of the 1975 World Series, considered by many to be the greatest game in baseball history. The book alternates between a chapter detailing every play in an inning with a section on a player in the game or a past game or history that relates to the game. A non baseball fan might find some of the detail of each pitch to be a bit tedious, but I found it riveting The thing that surprised me was the suspense of the book even though I knew who won the game(and actually watc This book focuses on game six of the 1975 World Series, considered by many to be the greatest game in baseball history. The book alternates between a chapter detailing every play in an inning with a section on a player in the game or a past game or history that relates to the game. A non baseball fan might find some of the detail of each pitch to be a bit tedious, but I found it riveting The thing that surprised me was the suspense of the book even though I knew who won the game(and actually watched the game at the time) This is due to Frost's storytelling as well as the great individual moments of the game. Especially interesting was the epilogue that traced the players and coaches and teams after the game. You follow the game and sadly how the "big business" of baseball has slowly robbed the game of its soul, a soul that was so evident on that October day in 1975

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jay

    A bit Boston-centric for my Cincinnatian self, but an excellent reconstruction of the game and its pivotal place, not just in that series, but in baseball history at the dawn of the free-agent era. I especially appreciated the insight on Sparky Anderson, who recently passed away. It was hard to ignore his role on that team, but just how much he meant to the players I think is underappreciated. Reds fans, especially ones of recent vintage, may think back on the Big Red Machine as a monolithic for A bit Boston-centric for my Cincinnatian self, but an excellent reconstruction of the game and its pivotal place, not just in that series, but in baseball history at the dawn of the free-agent era. I especially appreciated the insight on Sparky Anderson, who recently passed away. It was hard to ignore his role on that team, but just how much he meant to the players I think is underappreciated. Reds fans, especially ones of recent vintage, may think back on the Big Red Machine as a monolithic force in 70's baseball, but it's also important to note that team lost two World Series before it won one. Also poignant in its description of Anderson's near-fatal blunder in Game 6 surrounding Fred Norman, who Sparky came to regret leaving in the game, a move that he thought at the time might get him fired.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    A whole book about one baseball game. And it works. Frost does a great job of walking us through the game while mixing in all the inside stories and background on players and league at that time. Great insight and research getting quotes and such from many involved. If you are a baseball fan this is a def recommended read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Shay Caroline

    I've loved baseball all my life, and it's almost spooky how circumstances have enabled me to see or hear or attend so many important moments that have stuck with me all my life. Like the futzy tv that suddenly came to life one last time enabling me to see Jack Morris's no-hitter in 1984 before promptly dying for good. Or the random Reds game I went to while on vacation in 1971 with my parents, and saw Rick Wise not only throw a no-hitter, but hit two home runs as well--a feat never matched in al I've loved baseball all my life, and it's almost spooky how circumstances have enabled me to see or hear or attend so many important moments that have stuck with me all my life. Like the futzy tv that suddenly came to life one last time enabling me to see Jack Morris's no-hitter in 1984 before promptly dying for good. Or the random Reds game I went to while on vacation in 1971 with my parents, and saw Rick Wise not only throw a no-hitter, but hit two home runs as well--a feat never matched in all of the sport's long history. And then there was this, game six of the 1975 World Series, perhaps--along with Don Larsen's 1956 perfect game--the most famous World Series game ever played. I was literally half way around the world, serving in the Air Force, but still got to hear the broadcast on Armed Services Radio. I was doing my job when Bernie Carbo hit his dramatic game-tying home run in the 8th inning. And although it was after midnight in Boston, it was noon time where I was, and I was in the mess hall having lunch when Carlton Fisk hit his unforgettable home run to win that game. (While still overseas, I also got to see--albeit on tape delay--Mark "The Bird" Fidrych's famous win over the Yankees in 1976 at Tiger Stadium. It was almost like being home again for this Michigan gal.) Although I remember almost nothing about game 7 of the 1975 World Series except for reading about it in the Stars & Stripes newspaper, I remember the radio broadcast of game six vividly, and it is all brought back in bright and marvelous detail in this book by Mark Frost. Frost takes the reader through the lead-up to the game, introduces us to Luis Tiant and Sparky Anderson, and then takes us pitch by pitch through this famous contest. Then he wraps up all the broad strokes of what happened to the participants in ensuing years. The reader comes to understand the leadership of Tony Perez, the humanity of Sparky Anderson and Tom Yawkey, the struggles of Bernie Carbo and the pure wonderful joy of baseball at its best. Absolutely recommended.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    I can't say enough good things about this book. Game Six chronicles, in exquisite detail, one of the greatest baseball games ever played. And that's not just my opinion. "That was the best game I ever played in," said Pete Rose about game six of the 1975 World Series, even though his team lost the game. I was 17 during the 1975 World Series, watching intently, as it was yet another chance for the Red Sox, my favorite team since I was ten years old, to break their drought of WS championships. I wa I can't say enough good things about this book. Game Six chronicles, in exquisite detail, one of the greatest baseball games ever played. And that's not just my opinion. "That was the best game I ever played in," said Pete Rose about game six of the 1975 World Series, even though his team lost the game. I was 17 during the 1975 World Series, watching intently, as it was yet another chance for the Red Sox, my favorite team since I was ten years old, to break their drought of WS championships. I watched in horror, in game three, as Ed Armbrister interfered with Carlton Fisk in the tenth inning, on a bunt play, which led to a Reds victory (most of us believe game six would have been the end of the series if that interference had been called). That non-interference call is listed as one of the ten worst calls in baseball history, by the way. Game six was probably the crowning moment of one of the greatest World Series ever played. I say that, and my team lost. Mark Frost makes this game come alive as he goes through the preparations for the game, and then gives a pitch-by-pitch detailed account of the game. We learn histories of players and managers. I was trying to eat lunch at work when I read the account of Luis Tiant finally seeing his father again after over a decade of separation as his father was stuck in Cuba, unable to leave because of the tyrant, Fidel Castro. It's hard to eat lunch when you're crying. I gained a new respect for manager Sparky Anderson, who was a giant among men when it comes to the great game of baseball. His death, almost two years ago, makes it even that much more emotional. I laughed, I cried, I cheered. Then I was sad again, when Frost continues the story, and goes into many of the things that happened after this World Series, including the advent of free agency. I almost wish he had left that out of the book. He also chronicles that horrible strike of 1994, the one that eliminated the World Series for the first time in history. I remember how angry I was at that strike. I didn't pay to attend a baseball game for at least 5-6 years after that. I almost stopped paying attention at all. But my anger and disappointment doesn't hold a candle to Tony Kubek's. Kubek was calling games for the Yankees' TV station at the time. Here's what Frost says about that. "When the strike ended the 1994 season, Tony Kubek wrote acting commissioner Bud Selig a sixteen-page letter detailing the many ways in which he believed the sport had lost its way, and offered solutions for how he thought those critical problems could be addressed. Selig never answered him. "Kubek resigned from the Yankees that winter and never called another baseball game; he's never even watched one since, so distraught is he at what has happened to the game he loved, a disaster for which he holds players and owners equally accountable." To end this on a better note, I can't really review this without including Frost's account of the game winning home run, that even that has become an institution in the game of baseball. Bench signaled for the sinker, inside, and Darcy delivered. It didn't have his usual hard kick, cutting low and inside, and probably would have finished out of the zone, a pitch most hitters couldn't do much with, but Pudge Fisk, unusual for such a tall right-handed man, was a notorious inside/low-ball pull hitter, and that, finally, was Darcy's one and only mistake. Fisk saw it, liked it, reached down, and crushed it. In the broadcast truck, director Harry Coyle tried to hail his left field cameraman, Lou Gerard, stationed inside the Green Monster scoreboard, on his headset. Fisk's ball was headed straight down the left field line, a high towering shot, exactly the kind of flight path they'd planted a camera in there to pan up and capture. Gerard, at that moment, stood frozen in terror at his post, staring down at the biggest rat he'd ever seen in his life--the size of a frickin' housecat--that had just crawled across his foot. Half-paralyzed with fright, he couldn't swing his camera around; he held the close-up he'd established on Fisk. Fred Lynn jumped up from the on-deck circle to align himself with the left field foul line, the first person in the park to realize this was going to turn out well; he jumped straight into the air. As the ball reached the apex of its flight, it began to hook to the left, toward the yellow foul pole and screen. With his great bat speed, and the way he jumped on inside pitches, Fisk hit dozens of foul "home runs" a year, and this might be another one; and in any other ballpark in baseball, absent the short left field wall, it undoubtedly would have been. The crowd rose to its feet. Carlton Fisk didn't run. He turned sideways and took three abbreviated hops down the first base line, wildly waving his arms at the ball like a kid in a Little League game, urging, willing, begging it to stay fair. Pete Rose turned and sprinted down the left field line, following the flight of the ball toward the pole, willing it to turn foul, and never saw Fisk's dance toward first. Tony Kubek stepped forward right into the Reds dugout, alongside Sparky and everyone else in the club, all of them craning their necks forward to keep the ball in sight. Eyes fixed on the training room television, Luis Tiant [starting pitcher for the game] sat up in the whirlpool. Hearing the deep rumbling about to crescendo in Fenway all the way down in the depths of the old building, Bill Lee jumped off the training table nearby and started shouting. In the owner's box, Tom Yawkey and Duffy Lewis stood up, their hands reaching out for each other. In the broadcast booth, Dick Stockton, taking his turn back on play-by-play, his voice hoarse with emotion as he narrated: "There it goes, a long drive, if it stays fair..." Thirty-five thousand people locked in a suspended passage of time--less than four seconds by the clock--and then, yes, the ball crashed off the screen near the very top of the left field foul pole. "...home run!" finished Stockton, then wisely realized that the best thing now was to sit back and let the magic of the moment speak for itself. (282-284) In spite of the somewhat "downer" of an ending, I proclaim that Game Six is the best book on baseball that I have ever read. Mark Frost hath rendered a masterpiece. If you like baseball...no, if you LOVE baseball, you should read this book, no matter who your favorite team is.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Robert S

    Game Six of the 1975 World Series is considered by many individuals to be the greatest game of baseball to ever be played. Something that is a considerably tall order considering the long history of the sport and the number of thrilling games that it has seen over the years. Game Six certainly had all of the elements that can be found in the greatest game: Fantastic pitching, clutch hitting, the highest of stakes, the specter of history, and much more. It's difficult for me to state my own opinio Game Six of the 1975 World Series is considered by many individuals to be the greatest game of baseball to ever be played. Something that is a considerably tall order considering the long history of the sport and the number of thrilling games that it has seen over the years. Game Six certainly had all of the elements that can be found in the greatest game: Fantastic pitching, clutch hitting, the highest of stakes, the specter of history, and much more. It's difficult for me to state my own opinion, given my history of baseball is limited compared to many of the individuals who state their opinion on the matter coupled with my own personal preference. As a Red Sox fan, its difficult to not see Game 4 of the 2004 ALCS as arguably one of the greatest games to ever played, and so on. Mark Frost makes a fairly compelling argument in Game Six with an in-depth analysis of the game that could make ESPN's 30 for 30 jealous. Frost takes it one step further by providing commentary to what was happening in the country at the time, what was happening in baseball, and gives the reader an overall feeling for the time period. This ultimately helps and hurts the book because it often feels at times it is merely extending the page length instead of adding something more. Game Six will definitely appeal to the hardcore baseball fan, the casual Red Sox or Cincinnati fan, and those looking for a good analysis of a baseball game.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    It may be hard to conceive of a book about just one game being a page-turner. But this book is truly that. Granted it is arguably the greatest World Series game ever, but still. Mark Frost alternates the game's play by play with back stories about the main characters - the players, managers, announcers, TV and league execs. There's also a great analysis of the changing labor economics of baseball and what free agency hath wrought. As one who fell asleep before Fisk's home run (I can freely admit It may be hard to conceive of a book about just one game being a page-turner. But this book is truly that. Granted it is arguably the greatest World Series game ever, but still. Mark Frost alternates the game's play by play with back stories about the main characters - the players, managers, announcers, TV and league execs. There's also a great analysis of the changing labor economics of baseball and what free agency hath wrought. As one who fell asleep before Fisk's home run (I can freely admit that now), I felt I was watching it live - even more so. I never would have known Sparky Anderson (Reds Manager) was sneaking a cigarette! The most moving parts of the book though did not involve anything on the field - it was the reunion of Luis Tiant with his parents - he had not seen them for more than 10 years during which time Luis had achieved baseball success, married and had children of his own. The scene where they reunite at Logan Airport is forever etched in my psyche in all the best ways.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Brendon Desrochers

    It was readable, not boring, had some good detail that I appreciated. Ultimately, the tone became easier to pinpoint when Marty Brennaman was the first person the author thanked in the acknowledgements. The book was the wrong mix of bitter and wistful and maudlin and a bit naive. Its tone felt like it was straight from a Brennaman broadcast, and that's not a compliment. I'm glad I read this, I guess, but I doubt I would have been able to get through it if I weren't a big fan of the Red Sox (or t It was readable, not boring, had some good detail that I appreciated. Ultimately, the tone became easier to pinpoint when Marty Brennaman was the first person the author thanked in the acknowledgements. The book was the wrong mix of bitter and wistful and maudlin and a bit naive. Its tone felt like it was straight from a Brennaman broadcast, and that's not a compliment. I'm glad I read this, I guess, but I doubt I would have been able to get through it if I weren't a big fan of the Red Sox (or the Reds). It mixes in research and anecdotes with the play by play, which is nice, but it strangely lacked many direct quotes, which made me wonder what of the information and stories were from interviews vs. reports/clippings. That was slightly annoying but easy to get over because it was clear the author did his background research. But that slight annoyance was barely in my memory by the time the book ended, because the last 60 pages were like a never-ending newspaper screed...er...column about what's wrong with baseball and its decision-makers compared to the good ol' days.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Robert Melnyk

    Very good account of one of the greatest baseball games ever played. Although I am a huge Yankees fan, I have always thought that the 1975 World Series between Boston and Cincinnati was the best World Series I ever saw, based on drama, competition, and excitement. Game 6 of that World Series was probably one of the greatest baseball games ever played, so I thought I would give this book a try. It did not disappoint. The book gives not only a good account of the game itself, but also does a great Very good account of one of the greatest baseball games ever played. Although I am a huge Yankees fan, I have always thought that the 1975 World Series between Boston and Cincinnati was the best World Series I ever saw, based on drama, competition, and excitement. Game 6 of that World Series was probably one of the greatest baseball games ever played, so I thought I would give this book a try. It did not disappoint. The book gives not only a good account of the game itself, but also does a great job in covering the participants (players, coaches, owners), their history in the game and how they came to be part of this World Series. This is a great read for baseball fans, but I will admit that if you are not a baseball fan, this book will probably not be quite as interesting for you as it was for me :-).

  16. 5 out of 5

    Don Gorman

    (2). it is hard to imagine how you can stretch out 380 pages on one baseball game, even as famous a one as the sixth game of the 1975 series. Mark Frost does pretty well for the 300 or so pages he attributes to the game. The back stories, the culture information and the business end of baseball he goes into along with the play by play of the game sort of pulls it off. The final 80 pages, the "where are they now" section that combines the changing of the game with the participants status is less (2). it is hard to imagine how you can stretch out 380 pages on one baseball game, even as famous a one as the sixth game of the 1975 series. Mark Frost does pretty well for the 300 or so pages he attributes to the game. The back stories, the culture information and the business end of baseball he goes into along with the play by play of the game sort of pulls it off. The final 80 pages, the "where are they now" section that combines the changing of the game with the participants status is less interesting except to the true baseball nut. I am a baseball nut and found this book to be relatively interesting, but I think Frost is better as a golf writer.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Thom

    A pitch-by-pitch account of Game Six, which is probably too much for the casual baseball fan. Around that the author weaves history of both teams, the world series, and most of the individual players. After the outcome of this game, a chapter details the seventh game in much less detail. That is followed by the next few years, focused mostly on early free agency and the remaining careers of the major stars. This part lacks the passion of the earlier chapters. Finished reading about the game itself A pitch-by-pitch account of Game Six, which is probably too much for the casual baseball fan. Around that the author weaves history of both teams, the world series, and most of the individual players. After the outcome of this game, a chapter details the seventh game in much less detail. That is followed by the next few years, focused mostly on early free agency and the remaining careers of the major stars. This part lacks the passion of the earlier chapters. Finished reading about the game itself exactly 43 years after it happened, then finished the book on October 22nd. Tomorrow sees the start of the 2018 world series, Red Sox vs Dodgers.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Scott "Bjorn" Cummings

    Extremely well written book with excellent insight and interviews. I was born in 1989 so I never experienced the 1975 world series. this is the perfect audiobook book for my 8 day visit to Boston for the baseball fan in me. Author Mark frost delivers baseball history of Boston, Fenway Park, the big red machine and long time Red Sox owner Tom Yawkey. The only reason this book was not 5 stars was because the play by play was a little too in-depth. I could tell frost just rewatched the game and des Extremely well written book with excellent insight and interviews. I was born in 1989 so I never experienced the 1975 world series. this is the perfect audiobook book for my 8 day visit to Boston for the baseball fan in me. Author Mark frost delivers baseball history of Boston, Fenway Park, the big red machine and long time Red Sox owner Tom Yawkey. The only reason this book was not 5 stars was because the play by play was a little too in-depth. I could tell frost just rewatched the game and described the action. Got a little boring for me because today I hardly watch baseball games that way. But maybe that is my millennial generation in me.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Cool Papa

    Excellent baseball history of the players, coaches, and broadcasters associated with 1975 World Series Game 6, the “Carlton Fisk” game. Narrative takes the reader through a riveting, suspense-building play by play of the classic game. The first World Series I ever watched in any detail was the next year’s, 1976. Being a lifelong Yankee fan, I found myself while reading this book - even though knowing the outcome - cheering on the Cincinnati Reds.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    Excellent account of one of the greatest games-- and World Series-- in baseball history. The book, as you would expect from a book focusing on one game, spends plenty of time with the personalities behind the game, and provides an excellent context for the sport of baseball and America circa 1975. Worth reading for any baseball fan, but especially a fan of the Reds or Red Sox, who made the game so memorable.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Marklutherlawoffice

    Since we are not having major league baseball during the pandemic, we can at least read about the game. This is a good book-a little long-the Afterward was almost as good as the book. Think of Game Six as the last World Series before Arbitration, Free Agency, and the multi million dollars given to baseball players.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lucas

    It's difficult to read a book when you already know the outcome, but Mark Frost did an amazing job of giving background on all the players (and managers) involved. The ebb and flow of the game, the strategies that went into the pitches, moves, etc. came right off the page until I felt like I was in Fenway Park watching everything unfold in front of me.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    My interest in Baseball tends to ebb and flow...still I remember this World Series from when I was a kid. "Game Six" is chock full of great stories, insights, and player profiles. Time to go track down my old "Yaz" ball glove!

  24. 5 out of 5

    David

    Practically Roger Angell-esque. I enjoyed listening to it because it had the feel of listening to a game at times.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Emsoca

    This book was definitely amazing.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Richard Canale

    There are so many books on this subject, but this one reads like a the magical story that the game was. Character stories are not only in depth, but offer insights rarely known on more famous and lesser players. The story is one pitch at a time and not only puts you at the game, but in the era as well.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Andre

    This started off great. I love the way the author decided to craft the story of Game 6 of the 1975 World Series: he told it as if you were listening to a baseball game on the radio. He perfectly wove stories of the players and managers involved in the game around each pitch, each swing, each decision. This was a great baseball book… Then he got to the ninth inning. As I read about innings nine through eleven, I felt as if Mark Frost had grown impatient and wanted to rush his way to Carlton Fisk’s This started off great. I love the way the author decided to craft the story of Game 6 of the 1975 World Series: he told it as if you were listening to a baseball game on the radio. He perfectly wove stories of the players and managers involved in the game around each pitch, each swing, each decision. This was a great baseball book… Then he got to the ninth inning. As I read about innings nine through eleven, I felt as if Mark Frost had grown impatient and wanted to rush his way to Carlton Fisk’s famous homerun. Frost found his rhythm again for the twelfth inning, but my love affair with the book was over by then. He had fallen to cliché. For instance: “Yaz, at thirty-six, wasn’t the same hitter he’d been in his absolute prime, but he still had more sheer guts and gritty work ethic than any man who’d ever played the game.” Every nonfiction work driven by nostalgia will have a fair number of clichéd descriptions, but the end of this book was overrun by them. And that doesn’t even take into account the afterword. My goodness. The afterword takes up more than 17% of the book’s text. I just finished reading it, and I wonder if the author just couldn’t let anything he researched be left out of the book. He wrote a since-1975 biography of just about every player and executive involved in that game. There were even 500 or so words on Jim Rice, who didn’t play in that World Series. The afterword also included several long diatribes about free agency, the finances of Major League Baseball, and the game’s lost innocence. There was even a passage suggesting that the beginnings of the steroid era are to blame for Dave Concepcion’s omission from the Hall of Fame. What? It was excessive and unnecessary. And it was annoyingly preachy. The afterword ruined the book. Game Six was one of my favorite baseball books before the ninth inning. It was good before the afterword. Now, it’s just alright. A shame, really.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ty

    i read a couple of Mark Frost's fiction novels in the past and really enjoyed them...they were excellent thrillers...but then i did not hear of anything new from him for a long time. it turns out that he transitioned to writing mostly non-fiction, but since he focused on golf, of all things, his works never hit my radar (he wrote "The Legend of Bagger Vance" by the way). with "Game Six", Frost ventured back into my kind of thing...the book is about a legendary game in baseball history, the 6th g i read a couple of Mark Frost's fiction novels in the past and really enjoyed them...they were excellent thrillers...but then i did not hear of anything new from him for a long time. it turns out that he transitioned to writing mostly non-fiction, but since he focused on golf, of all things, his works never hit my radar (he wrote "The Legend of Bagger Vance" by the way). with "Game Six", Frost ventured back into my kind of thing...the book is about a legendary game in baseball history, the 6th game of the World Series in 1975 between the Cincinnati Reds and Boston Red Sox. i am not a fan of either team in particular, but i do remember the great players from those teams--Peter Rose, Johnny Bench, Carl Yazstremski, Carlton Fisk, Joe Morgan, Luis Tiant, and on and on--fondly from my earliest memories of baseball. Frost describes the game in excruciating detail, literally pitch by pitch, but the most fascinating part of the story is how the author links the players, owners, managers and fans back to the history of the teams, baseball in general and the United States...each pitch, at bat, and inning serving as a platform for anecdotes on the political situation in the 1970's, Cuban-American relations, the beginning of the free agency system in baseball, individual player's lifestyles and much else. the result is a fascinating, wide ranging narrative that will interest almost anyone, regardless of whether you are a big baseball fan or not. the only downside of the book is that the author insists on following all of the key and not so key characters to their ends as a long drawn out epilogue after Game 6 is over...up to the miraculous end of the game and then the final game of the series, the book is great. consider the rest optional...highly recommended for history fans, baseball fans, most everyone.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Larry Hostetler

    My enjoyment of this book was reduced by having read another book about the 1975 World Series very recently. While this book used Game Six as the backdrop, it provided much more information about the key players, the clubs, and the series than the simple title indicates. It really is about Game Six, but also about Cincinnati, Boston, and the entire 1975 series. However, "The Triumph of America's Pastime" is actually a little misleading. Frost goes into considerable detail on the developments tha My enjoyment of this book was reduced by having read another book about the 1975 World Series very recently. While this book used Game Six as the backdrop, it provided much more information about the key players, the clubs, and the series than the simple title indicates. It really is about Game Six, but also about Cincinnati, Boston, and the entire 1975 series. However, "The Triumph of America's Pastime" is actually a little misleading. Frost goes into considerable detail on the developments that took place both before and after the series that resulted in significant changes to the pay structure, the game, its competitiveness, and fan support/disenchantment. One of the interesting aspects of the writing was the diversion from game action to discuss various related topics: information about the batter, the pitcher, the manager, etc. It actually resulted in more of a flow similar to watching the game; short spurt of action, followed by time during which often strategy is discussed, changes or decisions made, etc. An interesting and creative way to present the game almost in real time. (Either I'm a slow reader or it took longer to read through the pages on the game than the game took.) I would have given the book a five-star rating if not for the protracted denoument. I found myself struggling to get to the end, especially when the content ceased being historical and began being editorial commentary. But it is certainly a good read and worth the time. I learned a lot, which is saying a lot. And enjoyed doing so. Baseball buffs - add this to your Must Read list.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Justin Cain

    A diehard baseball fan could tell you how Game 6 of the 1975 World Series ended with Boston catcher Carlton Fisk dramatically waving his extra-inning home run toward fair territory, and chaos that soon followed. As for the other details, Frost mentions them all in a wonderful story about one of the sport's seminal events. Describing pitch by pitch and inning by inning, Frost breaks down the excitement on the field, but also how each participant came to play in the October thriller. Each player h A diehard baseball fan could tell you how Game 6 of the 1975 World Series ended with Boston catcher Carlton Fisk dramatically waving his extra-inning home run toward fair territory, and chaos that soon followed. As for the other details, Frost mentions them all in a wonderful story about one of the sport's seminal events. Describing pitch by pitch and inning by inning, Frost breaks down the excitement on the field, but also how each participant came to play in the October thriller. Each player has a story from Boston's star pitcher Luis Tiant and his humble beginnings, to Cincinnati's rugged, trash talking third baseman, Pete Rose. From Yastrzemski to Bench, Evans to Morgan, Frost covers them all, along with the managers, owners and even broadcasters, expertly weaving from the past to that famous fall night. Many people forget that Cincinnati won game seven and the last quarter of the book tells about game seven and what became of each player in the years following. With each passing baseball season, the number of people who would later claim to have been at Game Six would increase twenty thousand.

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