counter create hit Healing Racism in America: A Prescription for the Disease - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Healing Racism in America: A Prescription for the Disease

Availability: Ready to download


Compare
Ads Banner

37 review for Healing Racism in America: A Prescription for the Disease

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    “There is no them. There’s only us” sing U2 in the song Invisible. This basic idea that we are all part of the same family is the foundation of Nathan Rutstein’s book Healing Racism in America: A Prescription for the Disease. Rutstein explains a metaphor of racism as a disease that affects everyone in the United States. He believes that white people must recognize our infection (the opinion that white people are superior to people of color) and the wounds these ideas cause and that everyone shou “There is no them. There’s only us” sing U2 in the song Invisible. This basic idea that we are all part of the same family is the foundation of Nathan Rutstein’s book Healing Racism in America: A Prescription for the Disease. Rutstein explains a metaphor of racism as a disease that affects everyone in the United States. He believes that white people must recognize our infection (the opinion that white people are superior to people of color) and the wounds these ideas cause and that everyone should work together to heal ourselves and each other. Rutstein’s theoretical framework makes sense to me and helps me put a lot of ideas I’ve encountered in different places together. I like his positive view of human nature as a bottomless reservoir of love and compassion and think his core ideas are common sense but are sadly not common practice. While I think it was impressive that a white man explored these issues more than 20 years ago, I think this book would be stronger if he co-wrote it with a person of color, discussed Latinos, Asians and Native Americans instead of mostly blacks and whites, and updated it for the current decade. (Sadly many of the problems he describes are still issues today and the author has passed away, so this isn’t possible.) I also think it would be interesting to apply a similar framework to issues of gender, sexuality, ability, etc. Thank you Joel for recommending this book! I really look forward to discussing it with MBCC folks.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Stewart

  3. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Hirsh

  4. 4 out of 5

    RWachter

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kylie Funk Kramer

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  7. 5 out of 5

    S.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Micah Perry

  9. 5 out of 5

    A.J. Richard

  10. 5 out of 5

    Clint Taylor

  11. 4 out of 5

    Joan Azevedo

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nuri

  13. 4 out of 5

    Charron Daughtry

  14. 4 out of 5

    John

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Rhine

  16. 5 out of 5

    Marshall White

  17. 4 out of 5

    Krista Jansons

  18. 4 out of 5

    Touraj Rahimi

  19. 4 out of 5

    Shira and Ari Evergreen

  20. 4 out of 5

    K

  21. 4 out of 5

    Luke Hackney

  22. 4 out of 5

    Martha Tansik

  23. 5 out of 5

    silenttobserving

  24. 4 out of 5

    Janelly

  25. 4 out of 5

    Virginia

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jimmy Marlow

  27. 5 out of 5

    Elena Garnelo

  28. 4 out of 5

    João Rúrick

  29. 4 out of 5

    Fabio Luiz

  30. 5 out of 5

    Latonya

  31. 5 out of 5

    Krista

  32. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

  33. 5 out of 5

    Kruegerk

  34. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie Limbird

  35. 5 out of 5

    Ansley Hardeman

  36. 5 out of 5

    Miryam

  37. 5 out of 5

    Julia

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.