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The Fighter's Mind: Inside the Mental Game

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In his acclaimed national best seller, "A Fighter s Heart," Sam Sheridan took readers with him as he stepped through the ropes into the dangerous world of professional fighting. From a muay Thai bout in Bangkok to Rio, where he trained with jiu-jitsu royalty, to Iowa, where he matched up against the toughest in MMA, Sheridan threw himself into a quest to understand how and In his acclaimed national best seller, "A Fighter s Heart," Sam Sheridan took readers with him as he stepped through the ropes into the dangerous world of professional fighting. From a muay Thai bout in Bangkok to Rio, where he trained with jiu-jitsu royalty, to Iowa, where he matched up against the toughest in MMA, Sheridan threw himself into a quest to understand how and why we fight. In "The Fighter s Mind," Sheridan does for the brain what his first book did for the body. To uncover the secrets of mental strength and success, Sheridan interviewed dozens of the world s most fascinating and dangerous men, including celebrated trainers Freddie Roach and Greg Jackson; champion fighters Randy Couture, Frank Shamrock, and Marcelo Garcia; ultrarunner David Horton; legendary wrestler Dan Gable, and many more. What are their secrets? How do they stay committed through years of training, craft a game plan, and adjust to the realities of the ring? How do they project strength when weak, and remain mentally tough despite incredible physical pain? A fascinating book, bursting at the seams with incredible stories and insight, "The Fighter s Mind" answers these questions and many more. "


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In his acclaimed national best seller, "A Fighter s Heart," Sam Sheridan took readers with him as he stepped through the ropes into the dangerous world of professional fighting. From a muay Thai bout in Bangkok to Rio, where he trained with jiu-jitsu royalty, to Iowa, where he matched up against the toughest in MMA, Sheridan threw himself into a quest to understand how and In his acclaimed national best seller, "A Fighter s Heart," Sam Sheridan took readers with him as he stepped through the ropes into the dangerous world of professional fighting. From a muay Thai bout in Bangkok to Rio, where he trained with jiu-jitsu royalty, to Iowa, where he matched up against the toughest in MMA, Sheridan threw himself into a quest to understand how and why we fight. In "The Fighter s Mind," Sheridan does for the brain what his first book did for the body. To uncover the secrets of mental strength and success, Sheridan interviewed dozens of the world s most fascinating and dangerous men, including celebrated trainers Freddie Roach and Greg Jackson; champion fighters Randy Couture, Frank Shamrock, and Marcelo Garcia; ultrarunner David Horton; legendary wrestler Dan Gable, and many more. What are their secrets? How do they stay committed through years of training, craft a game plan, and adjust to the realities of the ring? How do they project strength when weak, and remain mentally tough despite incredible physical pain? A fascinating book, bursting at the seams with incredible stories and insight, "The Fighter s Mind" answers these questions and many more. "

30 review for The Fighter's Mind: Inside the Mental Game

  1. 4 out of 5

    Khurram

    A good book parts of which were excellent. Sam Sheridan used very much the same formula as he did in Fighters Heart. Talking to the leading trainers and fighters in different combat sports. The main problem for me was that there was not too much new information in the book from Fighters Heart. This book was more along the lines of what trainers are looking for while they are training their fighters. The thing is when you are talking tot he top trainers, talking about their top fighters, these A good book parts of which were excellent. Sam Sheridan used very much the same formula as he did in Fighters Heart. Talking to the leading trainers and fighters in different combat sports. The main problem for me was that there was not too much new information in the book from Fighters Heart. This book was more along the lines of what trainers are looking for while they are training their fighters. The thing is when you are talking tot he top trainers, talking about their top fighters, these guys already have IT. Now the trainer just has to fine tune them. There were great chapters like Kenny Florian's where he talks about his career and preparation for his fights and his attitude to wards wins and losses. To me this is what the whole book should been like. Unfortunately some of it (probably because of the subject matter), reads like a bit of a text book, but there are more great chapters then the dry ones. I would recommend Fighters Heart or everyone wanting to know about a fighters mindset, and need to fight. This book is a good add on and if you have not read the first book it would possible very good as a stand alone book. It just falls a little short of being great for me.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Peter Derk

    What’s weird about this book is that I can’t really imagine anyone reading it without being much interested in fighting. What’s REALLY weird about THAT is that I don’t have much interest in fighting. Not on this level, anyway, with descriptions of people I’ve never heard of doing things that are difficult to imagine. Just trying to understand what’s going on, my recent Google search history must look like that of a guy prepping to street fight his way across South America. The long way. What I What’s weird about this book is that I can’t really imagine anyone reading it without being much interested in fighting. What’s REALLY weird about THAT is that I don’t have much interest in fighting. Not on this level, anyway, with descriptions of people I’ve never heard of doing things that are difficult to imagine. Just trying to understand what’s going on, my recent Google search history must look like that of a guy prepping to street fight his way across South America. The long way. What I WILL say is that there are some really interesting insights in this book that apply to a hell of a lot more than fighting. To everything, really. Which serves to make the point made in just about every book, something about how fighting is a universal language and takes us back to our roots and so on and so on. But honestly, there’s some stuff of value in here to the complete non-fighter. Because I don’t want to ruin the whole book by summarizing it, I’ll just talk about what I found to be one of the more interesting ideas in the book, and based on that you can decide if it’s worth your time to look through the rest. One thing a lot of the interviewed fighters agreed on was the idea of attacking someone where they are strongest. Let’s take this out of the realm of fistfighting for a minute. Let’s say you’re a warlord. And I’m a warlord. I built a huge fortress that I claim is impenetrable. Nobody has broken down the doors in a hundred years. Nobody’s even gotten close. Now, you’re going to attack me, and you’re faced with a choice. Most would say, Okay, the gate is impenetrable. Let’s go in the side door. But what a lot of fighters would tell you, and chess players and ping-pong players and all kinds of weirdos profiled in this book, is that you should come right through the front door. Crazy, I know. But the thing is, if you enter the fortress by digging a tunnel underneath, you still have to beat me once you’re inside. It’s going to be tough. I still think the front door is impenetrable, and though you’ve worked around it I still have that mental security blanket. If you manage to come in the front door, however, everything I thought I knew about how the battle would go is destroyed. I was expecting you to go around, or to subvert my defense. But instead you came right through, ran right over the top of my best weapon, and now I have no confidence in anything. In the world of mixed martial arts, you can kind of think of there being the worlds of stand-up fighting and ground fighting. If we were fighting, you an expert wrestler and me coming from a boxing background, you would assume that I was going to try and beat you with punches and to stay off the ground however I could. So your game plan would be to get me on the ground, even if it meant eating a few punches. But if I know that’s your strength, imagine if I decide that I’m going to take things to the ground right off, and for the first few minutes I manage to hold my own. The round ends, and then we both go back to our corners, but you go back knowing that I’m not afraid of the best weapon you have. It’s a lesson that applies to a lot of things, I think. I don’t think of myself as a person who is often frustrated, but in looking at it I think that a lot of the times I DO feel frustrated it’s as a result of being stymied by something that lies within my strengths. If I make one out of every 15 shots in pool, it doesn’t faze me because I don’t expect to make ANY. But if I try to spell the word “rhinoceros” ten times in a row, and every single time I see that red squiggly line appear beneath it, I’m going to start thinking something’s wrong. I’ll be wondering if I’m not the speller I once was. I’ll be thinking about “rhinoceros” the next time I go to spell “diplodocus” and feel completely sure that I’m going to fail. It’s a really great tool to be aware of, that in life you’re going to fail at things you’re good at, and it would behoove a person to be very aware of that and not be overly sensitive. There are probably half a dozen lessons like that in the book. So if it’s of interest to you, and if fighting is at least not a hindrance to your reading it, then I say go for it. If the fighting is still completely nonsensical and barbaric, you might try the author’s other book, A Fighter’s Heart, which is more about explaining that inexplicable: the Why. Oh, and also, Marcelo Garcia is a guy mentioned in the book. Here’s a brief video that goes a long way to explaining what’s so difficult to capture in words, especially at about 4 min 50 when he’s rolling around with a guy who is WAY bigger (even non-fight-fans can probably appreciate this, and it’s more akin to wrestling than fighting. No blood :) ). It’s like watching someone wrestle a pile of snakes. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AY8JlJ...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cody Lasko

    I picked this up hoping I’d like it maybe even half as much as I did Sheridan’s first work, “The Fighter’s Heart”. I was pleasantly blown away in how impressive it turned out to be. His opening salvo proved one of my favourite non fiction reads of all time. Sam captures fighting, martial arts, and human nature in a book that is a sure must read for any combat sport fan. I go so far as to say it’s a must read for any martial artist or even anyone interested in that facet of human nature. It’s I picked this up hoping I’d like it maybe even half as much as I did Sheridan’s first work, “The Fighter’s Heart”. I was pleasantly blown away in how impressive it turned out to be. His opening salvo proved one of my favourite non fiction reads of all time. Sam captures fighting, martial arts, and human nature in a book that is a sure must read for any combat sport fan. I go so far as to say it’s a must read for any martial artist or even anyone interested in that facet of human nature. It’s remarkable stuff in a remarkable work. So how did he follow such an achievement? With a slightly different approach, and with a different question in mind. The Fighter’s Heart was asking what drove a fighter to fight. The Fighter’s Mind is asking what fighter’s think. Through interviews with legends of combat sports (and even some ultra marathon runners) Sam pieces together the various tales and wisdoms of figures from across different backgrounds into little glimpses into the complexities of a fighter’s mindset. It’s intricate and complex yet entertaining and deeply human. While this all screams for fight fan’s attention, it is still easily digestible and complete with lessons that transcend fighting to the point of widespread applicability to daily life. It was like watching a movie after being told you’d love it, built lofty expectations, and then... actually loved it more than you expected. That’s how I felt putting it down.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    The Fighter's Mind is an outstanding book, a collection of essays by Sam Sheridan, each focussed on a different fighting discipline, such as Brazilian jiu-jitsu and boxing (with occasional essays focussed on non-fighting sports, such as long-distance running). Throughout the book, Sheridan is trying to unravel the mystery of what drives a fighter to continually put their life at risk in pursuit of a goal that can bring them little more in return than physical and mental injury. This book is The Fighter's Mind is an outstanding book, a collection of essays by Sam Sheridan, each focussed on a different fighting discipline, such as Brazilian jiu-jitsu and boxing (with occasional essays focussed on non-fighting sports, such as long-distance running). Throughout the book, Sheridan is trying to unravel the mystery of what drives a fighter to continually put their life at risk in pursuit of a goal that can bring them little more in return than physical and mental injury. This book is wonderful and, I suspect, even non-fight fans would enjoy it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel Woodburn

    A good read with lots of inspirational and insightful interviews. However I would have liked a few more interviews with more underdog/amateur type characters and a few more female fighter perspectives. Overall a fun read though.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Stone

    I’ve read many books on the mental art of toughness, discipline development and sports psychology, so I wasn’t expecting too much from this except for perhaps a synthesis and reframing of the varied existing theories applied to fighting. What I walked away with was any number of game-changing insights and lessons learned on how to develop and appreciate the importance of the mind when applied to any endeavour, including my own personal passion of bodybuilding and strength training. Yes, to call I’ve read many books on the mental art of toughness, discipline development and sports psychology, so I wasn’t expecting too much from this except for perhaps a synthesis and reframing of the varied existing theories applied to fighting. What I walked away with was any number of game-changing insights and lessons learned on how to develop and appreciate the importance of the mind when applied to any endeavour, including my own personal passion of bodybuilding and strength training. Yes, to call this book a “game-changer” isn’t simple review hyperbole - it will literally alter the way you think and approach your chosen endeavour whether you’re a fighter or not. Fighting is perhaps the perfect context for discussing the mental strategies of sport's psychology. You have the training and mental lead up to a match where the objective is to brutalise your opponent in a ring surrounded by a forum of your peers or the greater public. Money, pride, ego and personal safety are but a few things that are on the line whether you win or lose. The fight happens in real time and involves presence, strategy and any number of psychological and cognitive tools to draw on. And all of this needs to happen both at the conscious and mindless level, lest you find yourself face down on the canvass. Whether victory or failure ensues, lessons will be learned from the experience. I don't want to give too much away here, but Sheridan’s highly developed and researched book extrapolates the mental approaches from a range of fighting arts and their practitioners - the lessons learned from victories won and battles lost, the nature of sustaining the day to day grind, how athletes endure the physical rigours which require a level of discipline and fortitude under-appreciated by the non-athlete and perhaps never experienced by those who never transition to the higher echelons of any sport. Sheridan is extremely thorough in leaving no stone unturned and he travels to many parts of the world interviewing and researching coaching icons such as Pat Millitich, Greg Jackson the Gracie Family, to fighters Randy Couture, Kenny Florian and diverse fighter-philosophers such as Josh Waitzkin to name but a few. Be warned, It’s not a 12 step program of “do this and then that” style coaching. The lessons are contained within and extrapolated through Sheridan’s discussion and reflections on his interactions with industry icons, historical references and personal experiences. However, I defy you to read this book and not take away not only a large number of lessons you can apply to your own game but also the tools to assist you in living in the moment, strategies to apply to beating pressure, and enhancing your game in ways you’ve never even contemplated beyond the realm of simple physical training.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Hageman

    One of the few I couldn't put down, granted I was on an airplane with little else to do if I did put it down..but I don't think I would have anyways! This book is one for any sort of athlete, or just competitive people in general. No experience or even understanding of fighting/martial arts is required. This book brings such critical perspective to the mental game needed for almost any athletic arena, with a particular emphasis on 1v1 physical sports. Having only done one Brazilian Jiu Jitsu One of the few I couldn't put down, granted I was on an airplane with little else to do if I did put it down..but I don't think I would have anyways! This book is one for any sort of athlete, or just competitive people in general. No experience or even understanding of fighting/martial arts is required. This book brings such critical perspective to the mental game needed for almost any athletic arena, with a particular emphasis on 1v1 physical sports. Having only done one Brazilian Jiu Jitsu training session myself, I already had a brief perspective on how much more there was to the sport than what a typical bystander might suspect. This book, along with Sam Harris' article 'The Pleasures of Drowning', perfectly piece together the whole picture, or at least as much of one you can without experiencing it all yourself. Such sports are far from a bunch of half-brained idiots getting they faces messed up to make some money. Obviously, the section towards the end that highlights the unmatched reaction times of table tennis players, and their reliance on instincts and prediction abilities, did not go under-appreciated. Further, the section discussing the necessity to separate confidence from the ego was fascinating, and one that warrants a bit of reflection from everyone. Great book, read it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Leo Polovets

    This book is an excellent look into how fighters think about all aspects of fighting, including training, fighting under pressure, winning, and losing. Each chapter contains bits and pieces of interviews with great fighters, coaches, and artists, and the author weaves the quotes and ideas into a larger, cohesive narrative. What I really enjoyed about the book was that on the surface it's about the mentality of fighting, but it's not really about fighting -- it's about becoming better at whatever This book is an excellent look into how fighters think about all aspects of fighting, including training, fighting under pressure, winning, and losing. Each chapter contains bits and pieces of interviews with great fighters, coaches, and artists, and the author weaves the quotes and ideas into a larger, cohesive narrative. What I really enjoyed about the book was that on the surface it's about the mentality of fighting, but it's not really about fighting -- it's about becoming better at whatever you do. It's about finding your purpose in life and pursuing it relentlessly. There are some great life lessons in The Fighter's Mind, and you don't have to be a fighting fan to appreciate them. I'm not, and I certainly did.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Fabian Il.

    Great read not only for people intetested im MMA but in sports in general.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rosemary Ward

    When you fight skin-to-skin with another human being you have got some special kind of brave going on. This book honors that brave. There is nothing quite like it. True, to live is to fight. In one way or another. You don’t need to be in a physical cage – we all have our cages and we all have our demons. But, it is an elite group of warriors who do this kind of fighting. Sam Sheridan might not have written this for the grey-haired, 60-something shrimps out there like me, but dang-it, I really When you fight skin-to-skin with another human being you have got some special kind of brave going on. This book honors that brave. There is nothing quite like it. True, to live is to fight. In one way or another. You don’t need to be in a physical cage – we all have our cages and we all have our demons. But, it is an elite group of warriors who do this kind of fighting. Sam Sheridan might not have written this for the grey-haired, 60-something shrimps out there like me, but dang-it, I really loved this book. He crawls into the headspace of the combatants, where so many raw and relatable truths reside, and he shows us what it’s like…for them. How to win, how to lose, how to train, how to live. You don’t even have to be an athlete to appreciate this book. I did an audio-version and I actually pulled over a few times while driving from NJ to MA to jot down important ideas. My heart pounded with excitement as he described some of the blood baths. How much of our daily lives are real? Not much. Mostly, it’s fake. What we read in the news is fake, what we watch on TV is fake, what we read on FB, Twitter and IG …all drenched in fake. But, when two men (or women) are facing off in a cage or a ring or a pad, it is real. Someone is gonna get choked or pinned or KO’d. Someone is gonna win and someone is gonna lose. That’s real. Sam Sheridan has delivered 100% real. And, it is like some kind of a wonderful antidote to the fake soup we’ve got to swim around in every day. I did karate for 15 years, a very very long time ago. Before it was popular. Before there was protective equipment. Before there were a lot of rules. Back when you could easily get a broken jaw if you merely tried to block a punch coming from a guy with 6” and 80 pounds on you. No. As a shrimp without protective padding you had to also get the hell out of the way. I loved it, despite the bruises and fractures. Many people understand the feeling in the thrill of combat; Sheridan has given that feeling a clear voice and a reason, too. And the insights he offers, from the personal, troubled family histories to Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi’s concept of Flow – all superbly detailed. The man can really write. The stories of the grit in these fighters, who were getting respect in life quite literally through their blood, sweat and tears will fill you with a spirit to get up and do. Try harder. As a mother of four - three of them young men who can fight and do fight and who aren’t afraid to shed their own blood - I have high praise for a book which celebrates and validates man as warrior. Our men need more books like this. As a mom of men and as a woman who sparred competitively when much, much younger, I give this book high praises all around. And, I agree with Sam. The world is made of fire.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Renee Liu

    Trust your body and disbelieve your mind is what I get from this book. We normal human beings probably will never reach physical extremes like these fighters, this means that we probably will always resort to our mind to decide what to do with our bodies when facing challenges. However, we can learn to get more in tune with physical signals, and try to make decisions out of both the physical and the mental signals. It is always better because the body actually knows much more than our mind is Trust your body and disbelieve your mind is what I get from this book. We normal human beings probably will never reach physical extremes like these fighters, this means that we probably will always resort to our mind to decide what to do with our bodies when facing challenges. However, we can learn to get more in tune with physical signals, and try to make decisions out of both the physical and the mental signals. It is always better because the body actually knows much more than our mind is capable of, and the bodily experience can generate new lessons and tricks for the mind to use for a bigger challenges down the road. Some of my favorite quotes and summary, The physical attributes incurred by feeling excited and anxious are really similar. The only difference is that One makes you close yourself, the other makes yourself open and enjoy what's coming as opportunities to lean and smile at. 'See challenges as a technical maze where there are many hidden places to discover and learn. Challenges are not a fight against something, they are the unique gifts for a learning mind.' 'Success in ultra depends on the abilities to tolerate discomfort in prolonged period. It is winning the battle against the urge to stop. ' This is actually a repeated pattern from different fighters. Fighters who focus on finishing the battle don't get swept off their feet by anger, ear, or other weakening emotions that often occur amidst challenges. 'The ability to make fear work for you is essential. There is no shortcuts, it only takes time and efforts as the only inputs.'

  12. 4 out of 5

    Geoff

    This book was even better than I expected. It was not just about combat sport individuals from the view point of their training and how they got to where they are but an insight as to why they travelled the road to lead them to where they are. I liked that it encompassed individuals that competed in many different sports from MMA to Boxing to JiuJitsu to Chess and even an Ultra Marathon runner. All of these individuals the writer showed have a commonality in their love of what they do. What I This book was even better than I expected. It was not just about combat sport individuals from the view point of their training and how they got to where they are but an insight as to why they travelled the road to lead them to where they are. I liked that it encompassed individuals that competed in many different sports from MMA to Boxing to JiuJitsu to Chess and even an Ultra Marathon runner. All of these individuals the writer showed have a commonality in their love of what they do. What I also liked was at the end he looked in to the Why. Why go through all this? Why put your body and mind through the torture of the sport? On reflection of the question you realize that it was a spiritual journey for many, those that pursued their path not just to be the best but to further understand how what they are doing is no longer following an art but having become what they now are. What may have been the original reason for starting the journey no longer is as predominant as the journey progresses but at some point there is something that has taken over and once found fills the being. That's what I took away from this book. Definitely greatful for having read this and will no doubt read it many more times going forward.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Siddharth

    I am going to go against the popular opinion and say that you will only get a true thematic understanding of this book if you have "mindfully" trained in any martial art before. The Fighter's Mind is a unique investigative journey into the routines and belief systems of some of the greatest modern combat athletes. As a student of martial arts and a fighting nerd, this book has been a great supplement for my training camps and has helped me engender several conversations with fellow fighters and I am going to go against the popular opinion and say that you will only get a true thematic understanding of this book if you have "mindfully" trained in any martial art before. The Fighter's Mind is a unique investigative journey into the routines and belief systems of some of the greatest modern combat athletes. As a student of martial arts and a fighting nerd, this book has been a great supplement for my training camps and has helped me engender several conversations with fellow fighters and instructors in my circle. The sport of fighting has one put their life on the line every passing day. This forces great athletes to become highly attuned to their own inner talk and understand the role of discipline, repetition and apprenticeship to attaining mastery. So to an extent external damage becomes a forcing function for instilling mindfulness. And you also often reap enlightening insight into human performance that can be generalized beyond any martial art or sport. There's a reason why some of the greatest ancient swordsmen, military generals and fighters have inked the most insightful philosophy. Must read!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Morad

    A really nice read for fight enthusiasts. Some times I felt Sam's style is a bit choppy, jumping from a story to a quote to a thought without giving clear "knowledge" or a coherent idea. Sometimes I also felt that spending time with such legendary fighters and trainers could have been presented in a better way. That is the only negative remark I have. Otherwise, the book got better and better. My favorite chapters are those about Greg Jakson and John Waitzkin. The book covers a variety of mental, A really nice read for fight enthusiasts. Some times I felt Sam's style is a bit choppy, jumping from a story to a quote to a thought without giving clear "knowledge" or a coherent idea. Sometimes I also felt that spending time with such legendary fighters and trainers could have been presented in a better way. That is the only negative remark I have. Otherwise, the book got better and better. My favorite chapters are those about Greg Jakson and John Waitzkin. The book covers a variety of mental, emotional and stylistic areas of fighting. Ego, how to prepare, what mind set do fighters have before and during fights.. why to fight and so on. If you train or fight you will find a lot to relate to in this book and I may say it is a must read considering there are not so many great book about this topic out there.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Steve Vetter

    I loved this book even more than his first excellent book, A Fighters Heart. Sam is a very intelligent writer and his pursuit of truth is spellbinding. He covers so much ground and each topic is more interesting than the last. He tirelessly travels the globe interviewing some of the most distinguished, proven men and women in the fight game today. I never once got a sense of any macho bravado on his part and I am so impressed with what he was willing to put himself through to find his own truth. I loved this book even more than his first excellent book, A Fighters Heart. Sam is a very intelligent writer and his pursuit of truth is spellbinding. He covers so much ground and each topic is more interesting than the last. He tirelessly travels the globe interviewing some of the most distinguished, proven men and women in the fight game today. I never once got a sense of any macho bravado on his part and I am so impressed with what he was willing to put himself through to find his own truth. Sam is a fighter along with being so much more. Writer, art connoisseur, philosopher/thinker and an inspiration to us all. Just a great read from a very impressive individual!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nadia

    Glad this book exists, and some of the essays were illuminating, but I wished that the insights were pulled together a little more by the author, rather than relying on us reading each essay for each fighter/trainer's experience and asking us to make the links. About half way through I found myself skimming chapters and jumping to the fighters I was particularly interested in, because it felt like a bit of a slog and as a result I'm fairly sure I missed some good points. It was likely just not Glad this book exists, and some of the essays were illuminating, but I wished that the insights were pulled together a little more by the author, rather than relying on us reading each essay for each fighter/trainer's experience and asking us to make the links. About half way through I found myself skimming chapters and jumping to the fighters I was particularly interested in, because it felt like a bit of a slog and as a result I'm fairly sure I missed some good points. It was likely just not quite the format I was expecting when I picked it up. Overall useful read if you're at all interested in the mental aspect of fighting and training.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bennie

    Very good book once I got into it. For some reason, it took me a couple of chapters and was one of those books I would put down for a while and pick back up later. Once I got into it though, I really enjoyed the book. Good insight into the lives of fighters I had heard a lot about and watched but never got into the personal side. As a fan of MMA during the early days, most of the chapters covered fighters I had heard of and also added a few I had not heard of. Of particular interest to me was Very good book once I got into it. For some reason, it took me a couple of chapters and was one of those books I would put down for a while and pick back up later. Once I got into it though, I really enjoyed the book. Good insight into the lives of fighters I had heard a lot about and watched but never got into the personal side. As a fan of MMA during the early days, most of the chapters covered fighters I had heard of and also added a few I had not heard of. Of particular interest to me was the portion toward the end of that book that compared fighters to artists. Very interesting and referenced a few other books I will check into.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    This book is quite interesting,Sam does a great job of speaking with a unique group of highly skilled athletes & trainers.There are some excellent stories I this book.I found it best used as a reference point,using page finders to reread quotes or to find books that Sam references;which in some case of maybe most have been suggest by some of those athletes & coaches. Essentially you’ll find yourself going further down the rabbit hole,much like Sam has done.Which is inspiring & anyone This book is quite interesting,Sam does a great job of speaking with a unique group of highly skilled athletes & trainers.There are some excellent stories I this book.I found it best used as a reference point,using page finders to reread quotes or to find books that Sam references;which in some case of maybe most have been suggest by some of those athletes & coaches. Essentially you’ll find yourself going further down the rabbit hole,much like Sam has done.Which is inspiring & anyone whom is serious about mma or sports should do the sam.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sevé Torres

    Great book that explores the world of traditional Western fighting with a brief foray into Muay Thai. It's a book that relies on interviews, research, and careful meditation on what it means to be a professional/sports related fighter in today's world. It would have been nice to see a bit more on traditional martial arts, but I do understand why it took a back seat to the sport/professional side.

  20. 4 out of 5

    NinjaK

    I don't dislike the book - Sheridan does his research and it's an interesting topic - but for fuck's sake, get an editor, dude! There're typos on nearly every page, and some paragraphs I had to re-read 2 and 3 times before I understood what the fuck the author was trying to say. I can't believe this book was sent to print in such crappy shape.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ben Vogel

    Good book with insights into the mental toughness required to train, focus, and perform in an arena with severe consequences of bodily harm. Lessons conveyed in The Fighter's Mind certainly apply to more endeavors and occupations than just fighting, but certainly this book will mean more to those familiar with or fans of mixed martial arts.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jordan Teague

    Fantastic book I think even if you weren't interested In martial arts you would still enjoy it because the lessons learnt are applicable in other things I will definitely check out more from this author

  23. 4 out of 5

    Britania

    Thanks very much Braden. I loved this book. Very conversational, interesting, easy and thought-provoking. There are a lot of lessons that can be applied to everyday life in here. I really, really enjoyed it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    G M Higgins

    Thought provoking Sam does an excellent job of answering an extremely difficult question and takes the reader on a bell of an entertaining ride in doings so. A real gem of a book for fight fans.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Noah

    This book is about fighting and the mentality that fighters have to have in order to be successful. Also, the book interviews other fighters about their struggles and what made them so successful.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Scott Wozniak

    This book had some fascinating accounts of how the world's best fighters manage the mental part of their work. Yes--real fighters including formal martial artists, boxers, mixed martial artists, etc. There are some great stories--but the author offered almost nothing in terms of extra insight beyond what the fighters said. The content was barely cooked--maybe seared on the edges--but mostly I had to do my own cooking to come up with deeper insights.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Valentin Fedyaev

    Great book about motivation and improving mentality.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ian

    A decent read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dawid Milewski

    A must listen/read for combat sports athletes.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ward

    Some good insights. Focuses mostly on the MMA world.

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