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Prodigal Sons and Material Girls: How Not to Be Your Child's ATM

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In today's society many young people have lost sight of the value of money and seem to believe that money really does "grow on trees." Part expose and part survival guide, Prodigal Sons and Material Girls addresses the nagging issue faced by many parents today - why do their children have such unrealistic expectations about money? The book is divided into two comprehensive In today's society many young people have lost sight of the value of money and seem to believe that money really does "grow on trees." Part expose and part survival guide, Prodigal Sons and Material Girls addresses the nagging issue faced by many parents today - why do their children have such unrealistic expectations about money? The book is divided into two comprehensive parts. Part I outlines the disturbing facts about America's possession-crazed youth and the society that has distorted their views. You'll be introduced to everything from the "three-headed monster"--a high-powered triumvirate of consumer products companies, media conglomerates, and advertising agencies that has tremendous influence over your children--to the distorted view of the American Dream as shaped by principles known as "The Teen Commandments." In learning what you're up against you can teach financial responsibility from a position of strength. In Part II, Dungan offers creative and convincing examples on how to leverage his highly successful "Share-Save-Spend" approach to money - critical elements for you to help your children break free from the materialism that has become ingrained in our society. Through insightful anecdotes and simple exercises, you will learn how to: Talk to your children about money Understand the difference between financial wants and needs Increase the probability of your children having a prosperous life Raise your children's marketing IQ Maintain healthy financial boundaries Set a healthy example for your children to follow The "Share-Save-Spend" methodology will help your children establish healthy financial habits and will undoubtedly become their foundation for making a lifetime of responsible financial decisions. Nathan Dungan is an innovative leader in the financial services industry. Over the past 15 years, he has been a top-performing financial advisor outside of Philadelphia, PA and most recently served as Vice President of Marketing for Lutheran Brotherhood (now Thrivent Financial for Lutherans), a $57 billion member-owned financial services company with nearly 3 million members. Dungan is a frequent speaker and workshop leader and has been widely quoted on this subject in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, USA Today and has appeared on CNN and PBS.


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In today's society many young people have lost sight of the value of money and seem to believe that money really does "grow on trees." Part expose and part survival guide, Prodigal Sons and Material Girls addresses the nagging issue faced by many parents today - why do their children have such unrealistic expectations about money? The book is divided into two comprehensive In today's society many young people have lost sight of the value of money and seem to believe that money really does "grow on trees." Part expose and part survival guide, Prodigal Sons and Material Girls addresses the nagging issue faced by many parents today - why do their children have such unrealistic expectations about money? The book is divided into two comprehensive parts. Part I outlines the disturbing facts about America's possession-crazed youth and the society that has distorted their views. You'll be introduced to everything from the "three-headed monster"--a high-powered triumvirate of consumer products companies, media conglomerates, and advertising agencies that has tremendous influence over your children--to the distorted view of the American Dream as shaped by principles known as "The Teen Commandments." In learning what you're up against you can teach financial responsibility from a position of strength. In Part II, Dungan offers creative and convincing examples on how to leverage his highly successful "Share-Save-Spend" approach to money - critical elements for you to help your children break free from the materialism that has become ingrained in our society. Through insightful anecdotes and simple exercises, you will learn how to: Talk to your children about money Understand the difference between financial wants and needs Increase the probability of your children having a prosperous life Raise your children's marketing IQ Maintain healthy financial boundaries Set a healthy example for your children to follow The "Share-Save-Spend" methodology will help your children establish healthy financial habits and will undoubtedly become their foundation for making a lifetime of responsible financial decisions. Nathan Dungan is an innovative leader in the financial services industry. Over the past 15 years, he has been a top-performing financial advisor outside of Philadelphia, PA and most recently served as Vice President of Marketing for Lutheran Brotherhood (now Thrivent Financial for Lutherans), a $57 billion member-owned financial services company with nearly 3 million members. Dungan is a frequent speaker and workshop leader and has been widely quoted on this subject in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, USA Today and has appeared on CNN and PBS.

42 review for Prodigal Sons and Material Girls: How Not to Be Your Child's ATM

  1. 4 out of 5

    Laurie

    I was hoping for a good book to help me with educating my teenage son about money. Half the book explains why our children expect so much to be given to them, without having to work for any of it. This half was interesting, but not entirely useful. The other half was about reviewing our own financial issues, how to improve, and how to transfer good habits to our children. I think I would have rated this higher had I read this when my son was younger. Although the book was still interesting and s I was hoping for a good book to help me with educating my teenage son about money. Half the book explains why our children expect so much to be given to them, without having to work for any of it. This half was interesting, but not entirely useful. The other half was about reviewing our own financial issues, how to improve, and how to transfer good habits to our children. I think I would have rated this higher had I read this when my son was younger. Although the book was still interesting and somewhat helpful, it is most ideal if you have young kids and can start them with good financial habits right away.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Stacey

    This helped guide me as I was trying to decide how to handle allowance/ money management for my children. Although it's written from a religious standpoint, I found the information very practical and applicable. The one area I didn't agree with completely was on the need for as much donation as they claim (for children). Having said that, I still do follow the basic principles of this book for our kids (spend, save, donate). I used to have 3 piggy banks, one for each component. Now we keep track This helped guide me as I was trying to decide how to handle allowance/ money management for my children. Although it's written from a religious standpoint, I found the information very practical and applicable. The one area I didn't agree with completely was on the need for as much donation as they claim (for children). Having said that, I still do follow the basic principles of this book for our kids (spend, save, donate). I used to have 3 piggy banks, one for each component. Now we keep track of the money on a spreadsheet on the computer to help the kids learn more about a banking type of approach.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Eric Nelson

    Phenomenal work that helps readers see the insidiousness of consumer society by focusing on its impact on children and young adults. With mind-blowing statistics, good insight, and great questions at the end of each chapter, this book is a great place to start when looking at our consumer culture. Unfortunately, our market-driven society changes so quickly, this book is slowing becoming outdated.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Katja

    An interesting read...promotes teaching children to share/save/spend in that order and to have open discussions about finances.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

    A great way to get started thinking about money and your kids.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Good ideas, but bad writing. Repetitive.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Judy

  8. 5 out of 5

    Maria

  9. 4 out of 5

    Marnie

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kaye nolan

  12. 4 out of 5

    Patty

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jen Dennis

  14. 5 out of 5

    Richard

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  16. 5 out of 5

    Wayne Laney

  17. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

  18. 4 out of 5

    gcaltabiano

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jerry

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bryan

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lonsdale Koester

  22. 4 out of 5

    Garth Scrivner

  23. 4 out of 5

    Phyllis

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kari

  25. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dani

  27. 4 out of 5

    Christina

  28. 4 out of 5

    Allison

  29. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

  30. 5 out of 5

    Anita

  31. 4 out of 5

    John

  32. 4 out of 5

    Hallie Sawyer

  33. 4 out of 5

    Susan

  34. 4 out of 5

    James

  35. 5 out of 5

    Joline Godfrey

  36. 5 out of 5

    Sara

  37. 4 out of 5

    Terry

  38. 4 out of 5

    Abdirizak

  39. 5 out of 5

    Celer Salazar

  40. 4 out of 5

    Steffen

  41. 4 out of 5

    Larry Hause

  42. 5 out of 5

    Kat

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