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The Berenstain Bears Learn About Strangers

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When Papa Bear tells the cubs why they should never talk to strangers, Sister begins to view all strangers as evil until Mama brings some common sense to the problem.


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When Papa Bear tells the cubs why they should never talk to strangers, Sister begins to view all strangers as evil until Mama brings some common sense to the problem.

30 review for The Berenstain Bears Learn About Strangers

  1. 4 out of 5

    Calista

    This story is a bit preachy but I thought it handled the idea of strangers pretty well. Like most things in life, when you try and be thorough, it can be too much in the scar-tactics side of things and then life is too scary, but if you don't say anything, then you aren't scared, but something could happen. So, it's about finding that balance. I thought the story did a good job with that balance. This was more drama filled and less funny. It was still a fun book. The nephew read this with me. He This story is a bit preachy but I thought it handled the idea of strangers pretty well. Like most things in life, when you try and be thorough, it can be too much in the scar-tactics side of things and then life is too scary, but if you don't say anything, then you aren't scared, but something could happen. So, it's about finding that balance. I thought the story did a good job with that balance. This was more drama filled and less funny. It was still a fun book. The nephew read this with me. He thought the airplane they flew in the field looked cool and he wanted one like it. He wants a drone. I told him he's too young for a drone, and he informed me that he wasn't and I am too old for a drone. Okay. He thought it was a rather slow Bears' story and not very funny. He gave this 2 stars.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dianna

    This book was just what I needed to introduce the topic with my kids.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Sammis

    Books are a wonderful tool for teaching children about the world and to give them the tools to survive. That doesn't mean that books need to hit children over the head with these important life lessons. The Berenstain Bears series of books runs the gamut from entertaining stories of a brother and sister growing up to blatantly obvious and forced lessons. The Berenstain Bears Learn About Strangers is in the unfortunate obvious and forced end of the spectrum. It's frankly an awful book. It's as ba Books are a wonderful tool for teaching children about the world and to give them the tools to survive. That doesn't mean that books need to hit children over the head with these important life lessons. The Berenstain Bears series of books runs the gamut from entertaining stories of a brother and sister growing up to blatantly obvious and forced lessons. The Berenstain Bears Learn About Strangers is in the unfortunate obvious and forced end of the spectrum. It's frankly an awful book. It's as bad as those old "After School Specials." The story focuses around the importance of being wary of strangers and the tricks some adults play to lure children into dangerous situations. The book paints all adult strangers in the same brush, making Sister Bear see monsters in all the adults she meets. The book never once mentions that children are far more likely to be abused by family and friends than complete strangers. This book does a huge disservice to children unfortunate enough to read this story.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    On the surface, this book is a simple, heavy-handed warning to children about "stranger danger". However, on a subtle level it examines two important ontological oppositions. The primary of these is the relationship between self and other. This duality is present not just in the stranger/non-stranger pairing, but also in the contrast between Sister and Brother. The authors highlight the crucial difference between the siblings as being their adherence to social norms. This text is ripe for a femi On the surface, this book is a simple, heavy-handed warning to children about "stranger danger". However, on a subtle level it examines two important ontological oppositions. The primary of these is the relationship between self and other. This duality is present not just in the stranger/non-stranger pairing, but also in the contrast between Sister and Brother. The authors highlight the crucial difference between the siblings as being their adherence to social norms. This text is ripe for a feminist critique analyzing the relationships between the gendered bears (Papa and Brother vs. Mama and Sister) and their perception of society. But that's an exercise for another time. The second duality examined by this text is the relationship between madness and reason. The authors suggest that following a strict set of rules in which a negative is always assumed leads directly to insanity. In fact, the concluding paragraph is little more than an appeal to unstructured rationality. Despite this subtle analysis, the book is only moderately satisfying.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Pooja Banga

    This series is too cute.. It itself has message in it .. Though this series is short I am enjoying it .. This series is worth reading

  6. 5 out of 5

    Shacoria

    This is the 18th Berenstain Bears book that I have read. This book teaches about strangers and I think that it does a very good job. I especially liked the safety tips at the end of the book. I think that this will be my final Berenstain Bears book. I'm sort of getting sick of the bears altogether. There's nothing wrong with them and there's really only so much bear perfection a person can withstand.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    I realize that most Berenstain books are written to teach a morally driven or safety-conscious lesson and I have no problems with that concept--in fact that is precisely one of the reasons that I love Dr. Seuss stories. However, this is not the format in which to take itself too seriously and "stranger safety" isn't a theme that can be humorized, so it just doesn't work, other than as an awkward introduction to a well intended discussion.

  8. 4 out of 5

    R.

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Very wordy if you're thinking of reading to small kids. My 4-year-old got it pretty well, but she also really wanted story time, so she was paying attention. I doubt my son (1.5 years) would have any interest in it beyond tearing at the pages. It does teach an important lesson though, which is why we bought it as both of our kids are very much friendly social butterflies. Hopefully this will help teach them caution as they grow.

  9. 4 out of 5

    chucklesthescot

    Brother has become concerned about the way Sister feels the need to say hello to every stanger she meets so he tells his parents. Papa Bear manages to give Sister nightmares with tales of abduction while Mama tries to explain how you can't tell a bad apple in how they look. And it is Sister who manages to stop Brother making what could be a real error of judgement. This was another fun and educational read about the family of bears and the life lessons that they learn and share.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Crane

    A great book to introduce the idea to young children of the need to be cautious with unknown people. The language is age appropriate without being condescending, and the story is engaging. I'd recommend this book be on all bookshelves for little people to access!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tia K

    Classic This is a great classic book I enjoy reading to my kids as much as I enjoyed it being read to me when I was young.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mrl

    Read this with my grandson. Presents well to a 6yo answering questions and promoted good discussion from him about handling situations with strangers, what to do, what not to do, and offering this topic at this age level. Well written and presents topic well.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brittany Martin

    Stan and Jan Berenstain do a great job of explaining the danger of strangers on a kid-friendly level. The book begins by talking about how friendly Sister Bear was to everyone, even people she didn't know. Brother Bear tries to tell Sister that it is not a good idea to talk with strangers, but he decides to have Papa Bear explain that instead. Papa Bear, with best interests at heart, explains to Sister the dangers of strangers. However, Sister Bear had trouble sleeping that night and was scared Stan and Jan Berenstain do a great job of explaining the danger of strangers on a kid-friendly level. The book begins by talking about how friendly Sister Bear was to everyone, even people she didn't know. Brother Bear tries to tell Sister that it is not a good idea to talk with strangers, but he decides to have Papa Bear explain that instead. Papa Bear, with best interests at heart, explains to Sister the dangers of strangers. However, Sister Bear had trouble sleeping that night and was scared to be around people the next day. Mama notices this apprehension in Sister Bear, so she decides to explain strangers differently than Papa. She shows Sister Bear two different apples: one looked ugly but was pretty on the inside whereas the other looked pretty on the outside but had a worm on the inside. I think that this is a great kid-friendly stranger safety book. I really enjoyed reading it and seeing the changing perspectives in the characters. This book was realistic to families and therefore was very relateable. This book would be great to use when teaching children about safety. Mama's apple metaphor is something that would be so simple, yet profound that could be used to teach kids about strangers. This would be a great book to initiate critical thinking on this topic.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kristine Hansen

    Not a great book about stranger danger in the least. First of all, while the topic is important, what it doesn't do, is reassure a child that there's safety in the world anywhere at all except perhaps behind the closed doors of their own home. Which sadly isn't always the case. Sister sees danger around every corner after the well-meaning lecture that Papa Bear gives her, but then doesn't give her any way to build her confidence back. Instead we're leaving the child scared of the world, and think Not a great book about stranger danger in the least. First of all, while the topic is important, what it doesn't do, is reassure a child that there's safety in the world anywhere at all except perhaps behind the closed doors of their own home. Which sadly isn't always the case. Sister sees danger around every corner after the well-meaning lecture that Papa Bear gives her, but then doesn't give her any way to build her confidence back. Instead we're leaving the child scared of the world, and thinking twice about going outside. Where is the mention of the "safe" adults - finding a policeman for example when feeling threatened. Or in going to another trusted adult when safety is compromised (talking to a teacher, or parent, or other person in authority). Children need to be careful about stranger, and the threats they pose, but sadly, the majority of those who will be harmed, are harmed by someone they know. They need to be taught to instead trust their instincts - that when something feels 'wrong' it's ok to go and talk to a TRUSTED adult about the situation. Or even that there are safe places and safe people in the world. This whole book says too much, and at the same time, doesn't teach enough. If that makes sense. Definitely a poor choice to help a child to understand why it's not OK to be friendly with every person they meet.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    It's a difficult subject and was handled reasonably well. However, the book neglected the part about listening to your instincts (it mentions 'use common sense' at the end, but that is something entirely different). The book also ignores the fact that children are far more likely to be harmed and/or abused by people that they know than they are by strangers. This type of story lets everyone to conveniently continue to ignore the problem of abuse of children by people familiar to them Convenient It's a difficult subject and was handled reasonably well. However, the book neglected the part about listening to your instincts (it mentions 'use common sense' at the end, but that is something entirely different). The book also ignores the fact that children are far more likely to be harmed and/or abused by people that they know than they are by strangers. This type of story lets everyone to conveniently continue to ignore the problem of abuse of children by people familiar to them Convenient to everyone except the abused child of course, is being abused likely by someone close to home (if not in their home). There is a double whammy as this abused child is now also harmed by a system that teaches 'no, no, someone who is supposed to love you is not the problem. No, you should only worry about the hypothetical stranger who is unlikely to harm you at all'. Their experience is denied by a system that is all to happy to point the finger at boogey men and women in the bushes rather than deal with the very real problem of children being abused in their own homes (and schools, places of worship, etc.).

  16. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    As others have noted, this book focuses on Stranger Danger, not mentioning adults who may be in or close to the family or in positions of authority. But within this sphere, it gets across the importance of wariness without being frightening. My four-year-old's asked to read it several times since the first introduction and asked good questions based upon the story, so it's probably best used as a good starting point for many conversations rather than expecting it to cover the gamut of important As others have noted, this book focuses on Stranger Danger, not mentioning adults who may be in or close to the family or in positions of authority. But within this sphere, it gets across the importance of wariness without being frightening. My four-year-old's asked to read it several times since the first introduction and asked good questions based upon the story, so it's probably best used as a good starting point for many conversations rather than expecting it to cover the gamut of important information.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kimbely Fletcher

    Brother and Sister Bear are out with Papa and Brother starts talking to strangers. Pap warns them about the danger of strangers. This terrifies them and scares them away from all strangers. In the end Mama talks some common sense into the kids and tells them what to look out for. I would use this book in my classroom to teach about stranger danger. I could use it in a thematic unit about safety. I really enjoyed this book because it teaches a usable skill.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Hααlεч ♥ Fιѕнεя

    I love the Berenstain Bears. They were a reading stable as a child. I'm currently working on no talking to strangers with my two year old (which is a big thing because she is so chatty that I don't exist anymore- not good.) After I read this book to her, she walked around telling everyone "No Strangers." I don't think it worked so well because she still walks up to strangers and talks to them so we'll try another approach. Good for older kids, though.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Layla Ashby

    great little books for children, they tell stories of learning such as this one about Strangers. great pictures as well lovely and bright through out the book. I remember some of these books from childhood, I re found them online and reading when they become available for my reading app. Ideal books in this time of quarenten to read to young children to keep them entertained as well as slightly educational. 3 stars.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Diego

    Just re-reading my childhood books. I found a bunch but just wanted to read them again. As we grow up we look at things differently and this was quick and short read, I remembered the pictures and the exciting adventure from one page to the next. I now cherish my reading even more. These books truly gave me the desire to read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ellon

    I really like the way this book presented strangers. It was serious enough that children understand that they need to be careful but also addressed the fact that you don't have to be afraid to live. My kindergarten students seemed to really like the book and connect to it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Adrianne

    My 5 year old said he learned something from this book ("don't do anything with strangers."), but it's boring. It is a little heavy-handed.

  23. 4 out of 5

    MrsK Kulupka

    This was a good one for my child who doesn't know a stranger

  24. 5 out of 5

    Slow Man

    It is not easy to write about subject like this.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jayda Snead

    I believe that this book is a good option to introduce safety with strangers to a child. The book had pros and cons, but ultimately more pros. I believe that the writer may could have used language better suited for younger children. Overall, the book introduced the dangerousness in speaking to strangers. The author also showed “mama’s” aspect that while strangers are bad, not every stranger is bad. This book raised caution of children dealing with strangers, while also addressing on the last pa I believe that this book is a good option to introduce safety with strangers to a child. The book had pros and cons, but ultimately more pros. I believe that the writer may could have used language better suited for younger children. Overall, the book introduced the dangerousness in speaking to strangers. The author also showed “mama’s” aspect that while strangers are bad, not every stranger is bad. This book raised caution of children dealing with strangers, while also addressing on the last page the list of what to do to stay safe around strangers. The list contained six safety tips, which I believe to be helpful to guide children.

  26. 4 out of 5

    1stLady

    A Must Read This is a very informative book and discusses the essential reasons why children should be wary of strangers without having them afraid. I also really like the rules at the end of the book. If followed, it will definitely decrease the probability of a child being unknowingly put in danger. This is definitely a discussion worth having with children.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Samuel

    It's difficult to teach kids to be careful without them getting scared. This book tries, but ends up adding complexity to compensate.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tina Sorensen

    Too contrived. Too preachy. Not real life and makes light of a serious topic in a way that could be confusing for children. Not sure I like the Berenstain Bears.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Vince Alex

    In this book it talks about how to handle strangers and using your knowledge to figure out a situation.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    These books teach great lessons for my little ones.

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