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Meat: A Kitchen Education

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Award-winning author James Peterson is renowned for his instructive, encyclopedic cookbooks—each one a master course in the fundamentals of cooking.   Like well-honed knives, his books are indispensable tools for any kitchen enthusiast, from the novice home cook, to the aspiring chef, to the seasoned professional. Meat: A Kitchen Education is Peterson’s guide for carnivores Award-winning author James Peterson is renowned for his instructive, encyclopedic cookbooks—each one a master course in the fundamentals of cooking.   Like well-honed knives, his books are indispensable tools for any kitchen enthusiast, from the novice home cook, to the aspiring chef, to the seasoned professional. Meat: A Kitchen Education is Peterson’s guide for carnivores, with more than 175 recipes and 550 photographs that offer a full range of meat and poultry cuts and preparation techniques, presented with Peterson’s unassuming yet authoritative style.   Instruction begins with an informative summary of meat cooking methods: sautéing, broiling, roasting, braising, poaching, frying, stir-frying, grilling, smoking, and barbecuing. Then, chapter by chapter, Peterson demonstrates classic preparations for every type of meat available from the butcher: chicken, turkey, duck, quail, pheasant, squab, goose, guinea hen, rabbit, hare, venison, pork, beef, veal, lamb, and goat. Along the way, he shares his secrets for perfect pan sauces, gravies, and jus. Peterson completes the book with a selection of homemade sausages, pâtés, terrines, and broths that are the base of so many dishes. His trademark step-by-step photographs provide incomparable visual guidance for working with the complex structure and musculature of meats and illustrate all the basic prep techniques—from trussing a whole chicken to breaking down a whole lamb.   Whether you’re planning a quick turkey cutlet dinner, Sunday pot roast supper, casual hamburger cookout, or holiday prime rib feast, you’ll find it in Meat along with:   Roast Chicken with Ricotta and Sage; Coq au Vin; Duck Confit and Warm Lentil Salad; Long-Braised Rabbit Stew; Baby Back Ribs with Hoisin and Brown Sugar; Sauerbraten; Hanger Steak with Mushrooms and Red Wine; Oxtail Stew with Grapes; Osso Buco with Fennel and Leeks; Veal Kidneys with Juniper Sauce; Lamb Tagine with Raisins, Almonds, and Saffron; Terrine of Foie Gras; and more.   No matter the level of your culinary skills or your degree of kitchen confidence, the recipes and guidance in Meat will help you create scores of satisfying meals to delight your family and friends. This comprehensive volume will inspire you to fire up the stove, oven, or grill and master the art of cooking meat. Winner – 2011 James Beard Cookbook Award – Single Subject Category


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Award-winning author James Peterson is renowned for his instructive, encyclopedic cookbooks—each one a master course in the fundamentals of cooking.   Like well-honed knives, his books are indispensable tools for any kitchen enthusiast, from the novice home cook, to the aspiring chef, to the seasoned professional. Meat: A Kitchen Education is Peterson’s guide for carnivores Award-winning author James Peterson is renowned for his instructive, encyclopedic cookbooks—each one a master course in the fundamentals of cooking.   Like well-honed knives, his books are indispensable tools for any kitchen enthusiast, from the novice home cook, to the aspiring chef, to the seasoned professional. Meat: A Kitchen Education is Peterson’s guide for carnivores, with more than 175 recipes and 550 photographs that offer a full range of meat and poultry cuts and preparation techniques, presented with Peterson’s unassuming yet authoritative style.   Instruction begins with an informative summary of meat cooking methods: sautéing, broiling, roasting, braising, poaching, frying, stir-frying, grilling, smoking, and barbecuing. Then, chapter by chapter, Peterson demonstrates classic preparations for every type of meat available from the butcher: chicken, turkey, duck, quail, pheasant, squab, goose, guinea hen, rabbit, hare, venison, pork, beef, veal, lamb, and goat. Along the way, he shares his secrets for perfect pan sauces, gravies, and jus. Peterson completes the book with a selection of homemade sausages, pâtés, terrines, and broths that are the base of so many dishes. His trademark step-by-step photographs provide incomparable visual guidance for working with the complex structure and musculature of meats and illustrate all the basic prep techniques—from trussing a whole chicken to breaking down a whole lamb.   Whether you’re planning a quick turkey cutlet dinner, Sunday pot roast supper, casual hamburger cookout, or holiday prime rib feast, you’ll find it in Meat along with:   Roast Chicken with Ricotta and Sage; Coq au Vin; Duck Confit and Warm Lentil Salad; Long-Braised Rabbit Stew; Baby Back Ribs with Hoisin and Brown Sugar; Sauerbraten; Hanger Steak with Mushrooms and Red Wine; Oxtail Stew with Grapes; Osso Buco with Fennel and Leeks; Veal Kidneys with Juniper Sauce; Lamb Tagine with Raisins, Almonds, and Saffron; Terrine of Foie Gras; and more.   No matter the level of your culinary skills or your degree of kitchen confidence, the recipes and guidance in Meat will help you create scores of satisfying meals to delight your family and friends. This comprehensive volume will inspire you to fire up the stove, oven, or grill and master the art of cooking meat. Winner – 2011 James Beard Cookbook Award – Single Subject Category

30 review for Meat: A Kitchen Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    This is really an informative book on meat. You got to learn of the different cuts of the meat and the various techniques of cooking them. And not forgetting doable recipes for different kinds of meat. I have tried some of the recipes and the results were fabulous. This is one cookbook you want to add to your bookshelf.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    James Peterson is my favourite cookbook author (and I have read a lot of cookbooks). I hold his book on "Sauces" (the first of his books I ever read) in near biblical esteem. His book on "Soups" is particularly distinguished because, in it, he agrees with me so frequently. His book simply titled "Meats" is not encyclopedic but near so, both in terms of techniques and of animals to cook. There is nothing in these pages about cooking salmon splayed on alder sticks around a open fire Northwest Indi James Peterson is my favourite cookbook author (and I have read a lot of cookbooks). I hold his book on "Sauces" (the first of his books I ever read) in near biblical esteem. His book on "Soups" is particularly distinguished because, in it, he agrees with me so frequently. His book simply titled "Meats" is not encyclopedic but near so, both in terms of techniques and of animals to cook. There is nothing in these pages about cooking salmon splayed on alder sticks around a open fire Northwest Indian style nor how to prepare fugu (pufferfish) without killing your guests. But most of the rest is in there. Chicken and turkey, fowl, rabbit, hare and venison, pork, beef, veal, lamb and goat. The politically correct may preserve their superiority over the rest of us by omitting the chapter on veal and the several recipes for fois gras. The squeamish may omit his detailed instructions on how to bone a saddle of rabbit. The text concludes with offerings on sausage-making, pates and terrines, broths and consomme. Peterson is himself, at his best, an expert. He staged at Cordon Bleu in Paris. He owned Le Petit Robert in Greenwich Village. He taught for years at the French Culinary Institute in New York City. His cookbooks have won seven James Beard Awards. His writing is wry and funny and practical and the product of an immense amount of time in the kitchen. If I could only have twenty cookbooks on my shelf, surely four or five of them would be Peterson's, including this one.

  3. 5 out of 5

    May

    Well I started writing a review but then the internet ate it. Bummer. Two main points: Peterson is downright OBSESSED with larding (and other uses of fatback), which I find a bit repulsive; Peterson is also obsessed with deglazing, which I can appreciate but don't necessarily want to do for Every. Single. Recipe. On the positive side, he talks about a very wide variety of cuts from many different animals and how to cook them to achieve the best texture and flavor. He even has recipes for animals Well I started writing a review but then the internet ate it. Bummer. Two main points: Peterson is downright OBSESSED with larding (and other uses of fatback), which I find a bit repulsive; Peterson is also obsessed with deglazing, which I can appreciate but don't necessarily want to do for Every. Single. Recipe. On the positive side, he talks about a very wide variety of cuts from many different animals and how to cook them to achieve the best texture and flavor. He even has recipes for animals that aren't typically featured in most mainstream (American) cookbooks, such as goat or rabbit. And, if you're the kind of person that loves offal, this book most certainly has some recipes for you.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Linsey

    Hands down one of the most informative cookbooks I've read (and by read I mean skim through for recipes that look good). It is broken down by type of meat, so there are some chapters I skipped (I dont eat pork or veal). I really appreciated that at the beggining of each section, the author describes the different cuts of meats, cooking techniques and background of the type of meat. I found this especially helpful with the beef section. The recipes make me wish I had more time to cook, and more m Hands down one of the most informative cookbooks I've read (and by read I mean skim through for recipes that look good). It is broken down by type of meat, so there are some chapters I skipped (I dont eat pork or veal). I really appreciated that at the beggining of each section, the author describes the different cuts of meats, cooking techniques and background of the type of meat. I found this especially helpful with the beef section. The recipes make me wish I had more time to cook, and more money to cook with! Some of them look very complicated, others very simple. Good variety and I liked the use of pictures. Highly reccomened.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Aja Marsh

    3.5 - great basic all purpose book on meat with lots of step by step photos for cutting down and cooking different kinds, but i think i would have enjoyed this a bit more if i were cooking meat on a regular basis like i used to for work.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bob Stone

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rob

  8. 5 out of 5

    jodi l underwood

  9. 4 out of 5

    Laura Gause

  10. 5 out of 5

    Cyber

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ana Lucia de Andrade

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Jefferson

  13. 4 out of 5

    Isil Baskin

  14. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  15. 4 out of 5

    Steve

  16. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  17. 4 out of 5

    Monica Deutsch

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alok Srivastava

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Taylor

  20. 4 out of 5

    Colin

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mona Gerber

  22. 5 out of 5

    Marianthi

  23. 4 out of 5

    julie omamo

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ryo

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

  26. 5 out of 5

    Chase

  27. 4 out of 5

    Macario

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ian

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bill Benedict

  30. 4 out of 5

    Graham Fresn

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