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Asperger's in Pink: Pearls of Wisdom from inside the Bubble of Raising a Child with Asperger's

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Congratulations! It’s a girl … with Asperger’s! Join author and mom Julie Clark as she guides you through her family’s adventures raising a young child with Asperger’s Syndrome, a mild form of autism. Whether you have a boy or a girl with Asperger’s in your life, you’ll nod and smile as you turn each invaluable page of real-life challenges and solutions. On the way, you’ll Congratulations! It’s a girl … with Asperger’s! Join author and mom Julie Clark as she guides you through her family’s adventures raising a young child with Asperger’s Syndrome, a mild form of autism. Whether you have a boy or a girl with Asperger’s in your life, you’ll nod and smile as you turn each invaluable page of real-life challenges and solutions. On the way, you’ll be delighted and intrigued by candid commentary from her daughter Kristina, whose spirit and perseverance outweigh any obstacle she may face. Teeming with wisdom and wit, this book has much to offer parents as well as educators and professionals. Together, you'll explore:  The Road to Diagnosis The Teacher Who “Gets It” Occupational Therapy and “Group” Tuning in to Social Signals Winning the Daily Battles Hope for the Future And more!


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Congratulations! It’s a girl … with Asperger’s! Join author and mom Julie Clark as she guides you through her family’s adventures raising a young child with Asperger’s Syndrome, a mild form of autism. Whether you have a boy or a girl with Asperger’s in your life, you’ll nod and smile as you turn each invaluable page of real-life challenges and solutions. On the way, you’ll Congratulations! It’s a girl … with Asperger’s! Join author and mom Julie Clark as she guides you through her family’s adventures raising a young child with Asperger’s Syndrome, a mild form of autism. Whether you have a boy or a girl with Asperger’s in your life, you’ll nod and smile as you turn each invaluable page of real-life challenges and solutions. On the way, you’ll be delighted and intrigued by candid commentary from her daughter Kristina, whose spirit and perseverance outweigh any obstacle she may face. Teeming with wisdom and wit, this book has much to offer parents as well as educators and professionals. Together, you'll explore:  The Road to Diagnosis The Teacher Who “Gets It” Occupational Therapy and “Group” Tuning in to Social Signals Winning the Daily Battles Hope for the Future And more!

30 review for Asperger's in Pink: Pearls of Wisdom from inside the Bubble of Raising a Child with Asperger's

  1. 5 out of 5

    Valarie

    While there are some interesting anecdotes in this book, it is overall poorly written. The author uses metaphors that are never tied in to the topic, and litters each page with one-line, sentence fragment paragraphs. Choppy structure can work when used in moderation to really shock the reader, but Clark does not seem to understand that paragraphs should generally contain more than a few words. I don't necessarily agree with her philosophy on autism either, as she preaches that Asperger's can exp While there are some interesting anecdotes in this book, it is overall poorly written. The author uses metaphors that are never tied in to the topic, and litters each page with one-line, sentence fragment paragraphs. Choppy structure can work when used in moderation to really shock the reader, but Clark does not seem to understand that paragraphs should generally contain more than a few words. I don't necessarily agree with her philosophy on autism either, as she preaches that Asperger's can explain behavior but doesn't excuse it, while simultaneously expecting people to tolerate her daughter's rude remarks because she's got Asperger's. Kids on the Autism Spectrum definitely need special attention and understanding, but that doesn't mean you have to let them tell you you're fat or that the present you bought for them is ugly. If these kids don't get extra help in learning what is socially acceptable, how are they supposed to navigate university and full-time jobs? The organization of the book is also terrible - there are no less than FOUR introductions (well, a "foreword," a "before you begin," a "preface," and an "introduction"). Whoever edited the manuscript deserves criticism as well, since spelling mistakes, grammatical errors, and obviously, sentence fragments abound.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Camille K.

    This book was written by (and for) a neuro-typical who loves an Aspie. As an Aspie, I found it really annoying and unhelpful.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Geebowie

    as woman on the spectrum I purchased this book thinking it would help me in life. The cover claims it is for aspie girls as well as parents. however it is just you basic parental account about deal with the education system and keeping a you marriage intact and other stuff like that. also the author does not really give any info real about what girl with asperges are like that is other than her daughter. I am really glad I used a gift card to purchase this book and did not use my money to buy it as woman on the spectrum I purchased this book thinking it would help me in life. The cover claims it is for aspie girls as well as parents. however it is just you basic parental account about deal with the education system and keeping a you marriage intact and other stuff like that. also the author does not really give any info real about what girl with asperges are like that is other than her daughter. I am really glad I used a gift card to purchase this book and did not use my money to buy it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Donnette

    Good book. Easy to read, but sometimes repetitive. It helped me understand my daughter alot better. Thank you.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    A bit dated when I read it but still very good. Helped me through a time of need.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    I wavered between two and three stars for this book and finally settled on two when I realized that the only reason I was thinking about three is because the author's daughter sounds so much like my own daughter in many respects. That's a rarity as I've read dozens of books about autism spectrum disorders over the past seven years and have never come across another child who seems to resemble my own. When you talk to service providers in the field, they don't say that a kid has such and such pre I wavered between two and three stars for this book and finally settled on two when I realized that the only reason I was thinking about three is because the author's daughter sounds so much like my own daughter in many respects. That's a rarity as I've read dozens of books about autism spectrum disorders over the past seven years and have never come across another child who seems to resemble my own. When you talk to service providers in the field, they don't say that a kid has such and such presentation. Instead, they say, for example, "Oh Tony? Yeah, he's a lot like Dean in how he reacts to the water but toss in a little bit of the sensory issues like Monty." Now Monty's sensory issues are totally different than Bart's or Harry's. When it comes to my kid, the providers never compare her to someone else. They always say that she's a "special case" or "one of those out of the box kids" just because there aren't others that they've come across. I ended up with the two stars because I feel that the book is poorly written and poorly organized. It is also full of bad advice for parents when it comes to diagnosis and the entire educational system from identification through delivery of services. So many of the bad experiences the author's daughter had in elementary school could have been avoided if the parents weren't trying so hard to appear cooperative and weren't trying to avoid having others judge them for their parenting skills. Instead of trying to seem conciliatory and therefore choosing a 504 plan, they should have chosen an IEP plan and insisted in there that certain accommodations be made for their daughter - such as communication from teachers. When a child has an IEP, all teachers know about it, including those "specials" such as music who never knew that the child had a 504! With an IEP, the case manager is held to a federally mandated timetable to make sure meetings take place - there is built in accountability instead of wasting an entire school year waiting for meetings to take place because you're so concerned about appearing nice and reasonable. I also don't consider age 6 to be an early diagnosis as the author does. My daughter received a diagnosis at age 2, with the process started around 18 months. Most of the other parents I know whose children are on the spectrum received the official bad news between age 2 and 3. Perhaps if my daughter didn't have the early speech delays (which mean that her official diagnosis is high functioning autism although today she completely presents as Asperger's with no speech issues at all other than an outrageously large vocabulary for a child her age and choices in verbiage which make her sound like a throwback to the 19th century) she would have been diagnosed later but the social issues have always been quite apparent. Worthy of a library check out for the anecdotes but otherwise, there are better books with advice out there.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    I debated giving this book a three but it took a turn about two-thirds in (around the time of the Halloween shaming) and became quite a slog. I very much appreciate learning what I did about how Asperger's presents in girls while reading this book, but it was so very clearly about one specific family's journey with Kristina-flavored Asperger's, so I'm not sure how good of a reference it would be for others if their daughter experienced Asperger's differently. This book also could have done with I debated giving this book a three but it took a turn about two-thirds in (around the time of the Halloween shaming) and became quite a slog. I very much appreciate learning what I did about how Asperger's presents in girls while reading this book, but it was so very clearly about one specific family's journey with Kristina-flavored Asperger's, so I'm not sure how good of a reference it would be for others if their daughter experienced Asperger's differently. This book also could have done with quite a bit more editing, for reasons other reviewers have mentioned in more detail. As a childless, decidedly nonreligious, non-educator, single 31-year-old with no personal connection to any children or adults with Asperger's (of either sex/gender), I am not the target audience for this book, so your mileage may vary! As to how I ended up reading it, my mom read it for her master's program and I had borrowed it to lend to a friend but was slow in returning it and it fulfilled a spot on my Book Riot reading challenge, so here we are. Definitely worth a shot if you are truly clueless on the topic and want some personal stories, but I hope there are better resources out there. Read Harder 2019: A book published prior to Jan. 1, 2019 with fewer than 100 reviews on Goodreads

  8. 5 out of 5

    Gerry

    A Mom has decided to tell the world about her daughter, Kristina who has Aspergers. I've had an interest in Asperger's Syndrome for quite some time. I volunteer with a group that works with people with disabilities and some are on the Autistic Spectrum. And I'd like to put together a story time for Special needs kids at the library, so every bit of information I can pick up is helpful. I also enjoy reading books that are written from the perspective of sharing a story so that others might benefit A Mom has decided to tell the world about her daughter, Kristina who has Aspergers. I've had an interest in Asperger's Syndrome for quite some time. I volunteer with a group that works with people with disabilities and some are on the Autistic Spectrum. And I'd like to put together a story time for Special needs kids at the library, so every bit of information I can pick up is helpful. I also enjoy reading books that are written from the perspective of sharing a story so that others might benefit and this is one of those.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tracy

    I am loving this book, having a ten year old with Aspergers, this has helped me allot. I love that it has the child veiw in it as well, and all the little tips at the end of each chapter. Girls with Aspergers are quiet diffrent than boys with it, so now they have their own book :) So good, I will be buying this book to keep on my Autism Shelf at home! A great refrence to have around.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Valerie

    It's uncanny how similar the author's experiences have been to mine and how similar her daughter is to mine. Same concerns and worries for the future... I feel somewhat validated... Enjoyed this read- got some good tips for dealing with the schools, etc. It's uncanny how similar the author's experiences have been to mine and how similar her daughter is to mine. Same concerns and worries for the future... I feel somewhat validated... Enjoyed this read- got some good tips for dealing with the schools, etc.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Cyndi

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joan

  13. 4 out of 5

    Shadowfire

  14. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

  17. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Sareen

  18. 5 out of 5

    Christie Ann

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dionne

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tamara Dever

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mesocricetus Auratus

  22. 4 out of 5

    Elly Okkelberg

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kristy Pimm

  24. 5 out of 5

    Robyn

  25. 5 out of 5

    Julia Davin

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tim Gray

  27. 4 out of 5

    Paulette

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sylvia

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tzenka

  30. 5 out of 5

    Veronique

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