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Global governance is here--but not where most people think. This book presents the far-reaching argument that not only should we have a new world order but that we already do. Anne-Marie Slaughter asks us to completely rethink how we view the political world. It's not a collection of nation states that communicate through presidents, prime ministers, foreign ministers, and Global governance is here--but not where most people think. This book presents the far-reaching argument that not only should we have a new world order but that we already do. Anne-Marie Slaughter asks us to completely rethink how we view the political world. It's not a collection of nation states that communicate through presidents, prime ministers, foreign ministers, and the United Nations. Nor is it a clique of NGOs. It is governance through a complex global web of government networks. Slaughter provides the most compelling and authoritative description to date of a world in which government officials--police investigators, financial regulators, even judges and legislators--exchange information and coordinate activity across national borders to tackle crime, terrorism, and the routine daily grind of international interactions. National and international judges and regulators can also work closely together to enforce international agreements more effectively than ever before. These networks, which can range from a group of constitutional judges exchanging opinions across borders to more established organizations such as the G8 or the International Association of Insurance Supervisors, make things happen--and they frequently make good things happen. But they are underappreciated and, worse, underused to address the challenges facing the world today. The modern political world, then, consists of states whose component parts are fast becoming as important as their central leadership. Slaughter not only describes these networks but also sets forth a blueprint for how they can better the world. Despite questions of democratic accountability, this new world order is not one in which some world government enforces global dictates. The governments we already have at home are our best hope for tackling the problems we face abroad, in a networked world order.


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Global governance is here--but not where most people think. This book presents the far-reaching argument that not only should we have a new world order but that we already do. Anne-Marie Slaughter asks us to completely rethink how we view the political world. It's not a collection of nation states that communicate through presidents, prime ministers, foreign ministers, and Global governance is here--but not where most people think. This book presents the far-reaching argument that not only should we have a new world order but that we already do. Anne-Marie Slaughter asks us to completely rethink how we view the political world. It's not a collection of nation states that communicate through presidents, prime ministers, foreign ministers, and the United Nations. Nor is it a clique of NGOs. It is governance through a complex global web of government networks. Slaughter provides the most compelling and authoritative description to date of a world in which government officials--police investigators, financial regulators, even judges and legislators--exchange information and coordinate activity across national borders to tackle crime, terrorism, and the routine daily grind of international interactions. National and international judges and regulators can also work closely together to enforce international agreements more effectively than ever before. These networks, which can range from a group of constitutional judges exchanging opinions across borders to more established organizations such as the G8 or the International Association of Insurance Supervisors, make things happen--and they frequently make good things happen. But they are underappreciated and, worse, underused to address the challenges facing the world today. The modern political world, then, consists of states whose component parts are fast becoming as important as their central leadership. Slaughter not only describes these networks but also sets forth a blueprint for how they can better the world. Despite questions of democratic accountability, this new world order is not one in which some world government enforces global dictates. The governments we already have at home are our best hope for tackling the problems we face abroad, in a networked world order.

30 review for A New World Order

  1. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Terrazas

    Compelling outlook on the changing tools and mechanisms of foreign policymaking. Written nearly a decade ago by the scholar who until recently served as Director of Policy and Planning at the US State Department and whose influence is deeply obvious throughout the Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review and will likely continue to shape US foreign policy for decades to come.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Phoenix

    Networks are the new soul of consensus What is new about the world in the 21st century? For Thomas L. Friedman its information networks that make the world flat for business and communication. Anne-Marie Slaughter makes the observation that governance too is being transformed by the telecommunication revolution. Because the barriers between us are being broken down it is possible for like minded people to share ideas and conclusions around the world. The book looks at Regulatory Agencies, Jurisp Networks are the new soul of consensus What is new about the world in the 21st century? For Thomas L. Friedman its information networks that make the world flat for business and communication. Anne-Marie Slaughter makes the observation that governance too is being transformed by the telecommunication revolution. Because the barriers between us are being broken down it is possible for like minded people to share ideas and conclusions around the world. The book looks at Regulatory Agencies, Jurisprudence and finally Legislative Processes and observes transnational influences and accommodations. Slaughter notes that borrowing of laws and principles from one society to another is not new, but it has become much more common. She shows that a number of precedents in bioethics, copyright law and commercial rights are now drawing on extranational deliberations and decisions in order add clarity and come to decisions more rapidly. If a copyright case in Paris is similar to one in Washington a judge may cite the case to draw similar conclusions. Differences in definitions in such things as environmental legislation, labeling of goods and the establishing of standards are more easily handled between similar agencies rather than through top/down negotiation. The network of associations also extends to NGOs allowing relief, health care (ie: co-ordination during the SARS outbreak in 2003 or Bird Flu in 2006 - neither of which are covered in the book however the discussion in the book help illuminate both these situations) or standards organizations to co-operate with each other and to learn from each other's methods. Overall Prof. Slaughter considers this a good thing that we are now learning to learn from each other on a planetary scale. What she doesn't consider is the potential downside in outsourcing part of our decision making processes to others as she prefers to focus on the influences of like minded groups. Another concern that she does touch on briefly (around pp194) is that such decision making reflects a change in our conception of "democracy" - decisions are made by consensus but only through the effort of interested or concerned participants. I recommend this book for readers looking for examples of how transnational co-operation gets applied. The writing is warm and very accessible. For me it ties in nicely with the ideas of Duncan Watts (6 Degrees of Separation/Dynamic Networks) who's interest is in self organizing networks. Watts observes that networks usually contain focal nodes that act as bridges between subnets and thereby act as a conduit of information and ideas. With the growth of the Internet geography and time no longer limit the scope of these nets, so naturally they spread out horizontally between nations. Prof. Slaughter's writings are a timely observation of the phenomenon in the realm of international decision making. What is "new" about this world order is that it is not being imposed from above by single minded governments - it comes from all around us. Regardless as to how one feels about the prospect of this kind of world it does get you to think. I like that, which is why I recommend this book and its author. :-)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    Unlike many proposals for adapting governance for a "flatter" world, Slaughter begins not with first principles (and the vagueness of her philosophical assumptions does become a liability) but with a study on how globalization is already changing how state interdependence works. She documents how interactions among executives, regulators, judges, legislators, and civil society actors among nations increasingly trend toward informal networks of global cooperation and policy convergence. Her propo Unlike many proposals for adapting governance for a "flatter" world, Slaughter begins not with first principles (and the vagueness of her philosophical assumptions does become a liability) but with a study on how globalization is already changing how state interdependence works. She documents how interactions among executives, regulators, judges, legislators, and civil society actors among nations increasingly trend toward informal networks of global cooperation and policy convergence. Her proposal is to enhance and formalize these networks, sometimes critiqued as shadowy technocracies of the global elite, to ensure greater effectiveness and transparency. A grounded and dazzling manifesto.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Collins

    To me, these books are a trilogy of tales for our new, webbed-together world: Slaughter discusses the political and philosophical implications of a system that is no longer structured by nation-states. Gilman explores the awful underside of globalization, where more efficient flow of trade combined with uneven social, economic, and legal conditions have led to an exploitable “moral arbitrage”. Neuwirth examines the gigantic informal economy (NOT the same as Gilman’s – we’re talking street vendor To me, these books are a trilogy of tales for our new, webbed-together world: Slaughter discusses the political and philosophical implications of a system that is no longer structured by nation-states. Gilman explores the awful underside of globalization, where more efficient flow of trade combined with uneven social, economic, and legal conditions have led to an exploitable “moral arbitrage”. Neuwirth examines the gigantic informal economy (NOT the same as Gilman’s – we’re talking street vendors, care providers, agricultural workers…) – $10 trillion worldwide! – that is the basis of economic activity in so many communities, yet still uncounted by most analysis.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Alvaro Sánchez

    Lo encontré muy interesante y de avanzada cuando lo leí, en el 2006. Debería ser de interés para todos a quienes les interese el orden mundial en un mundo más o menos globalizado (por supuesto que hay diferentes puntos de vista) donde el concepto de una única soberanía integrada va desapareciendo o, mejor, se va suavizando o desagregando. Este libro, en mi concepto, tendrá vigencia por mucho tiempo; la globalización no se da de la noche a la mañana, es todo un proceso y abarca muchos campos de l Lo encontré muy interesante y de avanzada cuando lo leí, en el 2006. Debería ser de interés para todos a quienes les interese el orden mundial en un mundo más o menos globalizado (por supuesto que hay diferentes puntos de vista) donde el concepto de una única soberanía integrada va desapareciendo o, mejor, se va suavizando o desagregando. Este libro, en mi concepto, tendrá vigencia por mucho tiempo; la globalización no se da de la noche a la mañana, es todo un proceso y abarca muchos campos de la existencia de los Estados. Muy recomendable

  6. 4 out of 5

    Peter Dunn

    An interesting look at a best case for where global governance can go. I was fortunate enough to be able to ask the author a little more about the book in an interview with her last week on the occasion of her being an awarded an honorary degree by the university of Warwick see the podcast at http://bit.ly/19kg85T An interesting look at a best case for where global governance can go. I was fortunate enough to be able to ask the author a little more about the book in an interview with her last week on the occasion of her being an awarded an honorary degree by the university of Warwick see the podcast at http://bit.ly/19kg85T

  7. 5 out of 5

    Aleksandar Dimitrijevic

    Good clear thinking, many examples. Good book all around, if you are interested in Internationbal relations and integration and cooperation of the states.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chenreis

  9. 4 out of 5

    Anna Jacobs

  10. 5 out of 5

    Heiki Eesmaa

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Palin

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jackson

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Lines

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

  15. 4 out of 5

    Steven

  16. 5 out of 5

    Hugh

  17. 4 out of 5

    Claire Leavitt

  18. 4 out of 5

    Suvi

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kostas

  20. 4 out of 5

    Francesco

  21. 4 out of 5

    Julia

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mark Schrad

  23. 5 out of 5

    Renee

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lesley Lathrop

  25. 4 out of 5

    Charo Welle

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jayne Tristan

  27. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa van den Boogaard

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sikander

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lena T.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Roderick Feltzer

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