counter create hit Lithuania Ascending: A Pagan Empire Within East-Central Europe, 1295-1345 - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Lithuania Ascending: A Pagan Empire Within East-Central Europe, 1295-1345

Availability: Ready to download

From 1250 to 1795 Lithuania covered a vast area of eastern and central Europe. Until 1387 the country was pagan. How this huge state came to expand, defend itself against western European crusaders and play a conspicuous part in European life are the main subjects of this book. Chapters are devoted to the types of sources used, to the religion of the ancient Balts (and the From 1250 to 1795 Lithuania covered a vast area of eastern and central Europe. Until 1387 the country was pagan. How this huge state came to expand, defend itself against western European crusaders and play a conspicuous part in European life are the main subjects of this book. Chapters are devoted to the types of sources used, to the religion of the ancient Balts (and the discovery of a pagan temple in Vilnius in the late 1980s), and to Lithuanian relations and wars with Poland and the Germans. Under Grand Duke Gediminas, Lithuania came to control more of Russia than the prince of Moscow.


Compare
Ads Banner

From 1250 to 1795 Lithuania covered a vast area of eastern and central Europe. Until 1387 the country was pagan. How this huge state came to expand, defend itself against western European crusaders and play a conspicuous part in European life are the main subjects of this book. Chapters are devoted to the types of sources used, to the religion of the ancient Balts (and the From 1250 to 1795 Lithuania covered a vast area of eastern and central Europe. Until 1387 the country was pagan. How this huge state came to expand, defend itself against western European crusaders and play a conspicuous part in European life are the main subjects of this book. Chapters are devoted to the types of sources used, to the religion of the ancient Balts (and the discovery of a pagan temple in Vilnius in the late 1980s), and to Lithuanian relations and wars with Poland and the Germans. Under Grand Duke Gediminas, Lithuania came to control more of Russia than the prince of Moscow.

38 review for Lithuania Ascending: A Pagan Empire Within East-Central Europe, 1295-1345

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kenghis Khan

    11/9 - finally growing on me. getting really interesting in the parts about how Gediminas saw his baptism as his trump card against the Teutonic Knights. The premise of the book was intriguing. Almost 100 years before the Protestant Reformation and the fall of Constantinople there was a pagan power in Europe that not only avoided becoming Christianized for several centuries longer than any other European society, but in fact thrived. It is a great what-if moment in history - had the Pagan empire 11/9 - finally growing on me. getting really interesting in the parts about how Gediminas saw his baptism as his trump card against the Teutonic Knights. The premise of the book was intriguing. Almost 100 years before the Protestant Reformation and the fall of Constantinople there was a pagan power in Europe that not only avoided becoming Christianized for several centuries longer than any other European society, but in fact thrived. It is a great what-if moment in history - had the Pagan empire held out for another mere 100 years (after resisting Christianization for almost a millennium) it might have found a way to survive with its ways in tact. To understand these developments in the moment where western Christianity was supposed to be at is strongest from a Lithuanian perspective is an unparalleled and promising approach. Generally a well argued book but it still leans very heavily on non-Lithuanian perspectives and sources. This is to some extent understandable given the paucity of sources. Still, social history particularly the political ramifications of the pagan cult was a bit weak. The author's chapter on Lithuanian religion seemed lacking, especially given that it was what truly sets Lithuania apart. But again, the lack of source material does make it hard, even if the author leaves a lot of blank holes that might have been filled by archaeology and comparative ethnography and linguistics. Some other points are well presented: the author's claim about how Christianity was a presence at least among the ruling elite (but not the Grand Duke) in Lithuania is convincing. I was very impressed by the focus on diplomacy as a strategy, which is an exciting way to present history. The author's comparisons to other medieval societies is somewhat less illuminating, and the author had a tough job of writing both for the European medievalist and a non-specialist audience. Untranslated Latin reproduced verbatim, and the considerable namedropping of researchers many non-historians have never heard of in the main text are just a few of the distractions for the non-specialist reader.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tlaloc

    This is the best book on medieval Lithuania I've read. This is the only book on medieval Lithuania I've read. Good start? I think so. S. C. Rowell works with what he has, so this is mainly a political synopsis of Lithuania's rise to power under Gediminas and his predecessors. This means it's a linear telling of the battles and maneuverings of its Grand Duke and his armies, with an emphasis on his foreign policy with the Papacy and Catholics to his West, and the Orthodox to his east. Because of wha This is the best book on medieval Lithuania I've read. This is the only book on medieval Lithuania I've read. Good start? I think so. S. C. Rowell works with what he has, so this is mainly a political synopsis of Lithuania's rise to power under Gediminas and his predecessors. This means it's a linear telling of the battles and maneuverings of its Grand Duke and his armies, with an emphasis on his foreign policy with the Papacy and Catholics to his West, and the Orthodox to his east. Because of what I would assume is the dearth of ready information, it doesn't go in to any social or economic analysis. If you're looking for information about the everyday medieval Lithuanian, or their way of life, this may not be the best place to look. What the book excels in is in explaining what the Lithuanian state was and wasn't, dispelling certain myths. A lengthy chapter critically assesses Lithuanian paganism as a monolithic construct (it probably wasn't). While this was one of the defining, if not *the* defining, characteristics of Lithuania, the book goes to great lengths to show the pragmatic stance the state took in accommodating and living with non-Lithuanians, and fostering (and actively meddling in the affairs of) foreign faiths so long as they did not threaten the status quo. Case in point: in the early 1300's there were probably more Orthodox within Lithuania's borders at the time than there were Lithuanians themselves. It's not too long, nor is it too dense (the author displays an extensive fondness for latin phrases and terms). It's worth the read if you're interested in Lithuania's history as a Grand Duchy.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

    Well it is written with the least amount of flourish and panache possible, but despite this it is chock full of primary-sourced facts and pretty much the only english language treatment you are going to get on this topic as it is. It also has alot of thorough detail i don't think you are likely to get anywhere else so, it comes recommended for anyone interested in the crusades of the Baltic region and state formation. There is even some details about what little we know about Lithuanian paganism Well it is written with the least amount of flourish and panache possible, but despite this it is chock full of primary-sourced facts and pretty much the only english language treatment you are going to get on this topic as it is. It also has alot of thorough detail i don't think you are likely to get anywhere else so, it comes recommended for anyone interested in the crusades of the Baltic region and state formation. There is even some details about what little we know about Lithuanian paganism and how it was organized at the time.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alexey Alexeev

  5. 4 out of 5

    Claudio Fatti

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chiara Barlassina

  7. 5 out of 5

    1085reader

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tristramn

  10. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  11. 4 out of 5

    Gintas Jarasius

  12. 5 out of 5

    Razib Khan

  13. 5 out of 5

    Daiva Venckus

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joy

  15. 4 out of 5

    Šarūnas

  16. 4 out of 5

    Erin Virginia

  17. 5 out of 5

    Wikimedia Italia

  18. 4 out of 5

    Katka

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mindaugas

  20. 5 out of 5

    dp

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tim Ormsby

  22. 4 out of 5

    Francesco Sorrenti

  23. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Shipman

  24. 5 out of 5

    Eadweard

  25. 5 out of 5

    thistle

  26. 5 out of 5

    Raymond

  27. 4 out of 5

    Vijay

  28. 5 out of 5

    Arvind Chandrakantan

  29. 4 out of 5

    Virga

  30. 4 out of 5

    Marília Bia

  31. 5 out of 5

    Julie Hulten

  32. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia Abrams

  33. 4 out of 5

    marciverse

  34. 4 out of 5

    E.C. Ambrose

  35. 5 out of 5

    Chayim

  36. 5 out of 5

    Animelove24 Brown

  37. 5 out of 5

    Tribblemaker

  38. 5 out of 5

    Aashish C

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.