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Critics of President Obama have attacked him as a socialist, an African-American radical, a big government liberal. But somehow the critics have failed to reveal what's truly driving Barack Obama. Now bestselling author Dinesh DSouza throws out these misplaced attacks in his new book, The Roots of Obamas Rage.The reason, explains D'Souza, that Obama appears to be working Critics of President Obama have attacked him as a socialist, an African-American radical, a big government liberal. But somehow the critics have failed to reveal what's truly driving Barack Obama. Now bestselling author Dinesh D’Souza throws out these misplaced attacks in his new book, The Roots of Obama’s Rage.The reason, explains D'Souza, that Obama appears to be working to destroy America from within is found, as Obama himself admits, in "The Dreams of His Father": a deeply-hostile anti-colonialism. Instilled in him by his father, this worldview has led President Obama to resent America and everything for which we stand.Viewing Obama through this anti-colonialism prism and drawing evidence from President Obama’s own life and writings, D’Souza masterfully shows how Obama is working to weaken and punish America here and abroad. From enacting crippling financial reforms to setting artificial withdrawal dates in Iraq and Afghanistan, Obama is trying to muzzle the capitalism which he sees as exploiting the weak. Our president, argues D'Souza, is more concerned with being labeled as America the Oppressor than winning the war on terror. Other examples of how Obama's anti-colonial mindset influence his policies include:in the midst of the BP oil spill Obama made a point of saying that while the United States has 2 percent of the world’s oil, it uses 25 percent of the world’s (apparently limited) oil resources – as if using that additional 23 percent were a form of Western piracy and inequity, the Churchill bust in the Oval Office—given to the U.S. by Tony Blair after the September 11 attacks—was banished from the White House and sent back to Britain, Obama’s conference on Iran and North Korea’s nuclear weapons programs ends with nothing being done about Iran and North Korea, but with reductions in the Soviet and American stockpiles, and Obama spent 20 years in the Afrocentric church of the Reverend Wright—to whose church he was first attracted by a sign outside that said: FREE AFRICA. The Roots of Obama’s Rage reveals Obama for who he really is: a man driven by the anti-colonial ideology of his father and the first American president to actually seek to reduce America's strength, influence, and standard of living. Controversial and compelling, The Roots of Obama’s Rage is poised to be the one book that truly defines Obama and his presidency.


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Critics of President Obama have attacked him as a socialist, an African-American radical, a big government liberal. But somehow the critics have failed to reveal what's truly driving Barack Obama. Now bestselling author Dinesh DSouza throws out these misplaced attacks in his new book, The Roots of Obamas Rage.The reason, explains D'Souza, that Obama appears to be working Critics of President Obama have attacked him as a socialist, an African-American radical, a big government liberal. But somehow the critics have failed to reveal what's truly driving Barack Obama. Now bestselling author Dinesh D’Souza throws out these misplaced attacks in his new book, The Roots of Obama’s Rage.The reason, explains D'Souza, that Obama appears to be working to destroy America from within is found, as Obama himself admits, in "The Dreams of His Father": a deeply-hostile anti-colonialism. Instilled in him by his father, this worldview has led President Obama to resent America and everything for which we stand.Viewing Obama through this anti-colonialism prism and drawing evidence from President Obama’s own life and writings, D’Souza masterfully shows how Obama is working to weaken and punish America here and abroad. From enacting crippling financial reforms to setting artificial withdrawal dates in Iraq and Afghanistan, Obama is trying to muzzle the capitalism which he sees as exploiting the weak. Our president, argues D'Souza, is more concerned with being labeled as America the Oppressor than winning the war on terror. Other examples of how Obama's anti-colonial mindset influence his policies include:in the midst of the BP oil spill Obama made a point of saying that while the United States has 2 percent of the world’s oil, it uses 25 percent of the world’s (apparently limited) oil resources – as if using that additional 23 percent were a form of Western piracy and inequity, the Churchill bust in the Oval Office—given to the U.S. by Tony Blair after the September 11 attacks—was banished from the White House and sent back to Britain, Obama’s conference on Iran and North Korea’s nuclear weapons programs ends with nothing being done about Iran and North Korea, but with reductions in the Soviet and American stockpiles, and Obama spent 20 years in the Afrocentric church of the Reverend Wright—to whose church he was first attracted by a sign outside that said: FREE AFRICA. The Roots of Obama’s Rage reveals Obama for who he really is: a man driven by the anti-colonial ideology of his father and the first American president to actually seek to reduce America's strength, influence, and standard of living. Controversial and compelling, The Roots of Obama’s Rage is poised to be the one book that truly defines Obama and his presidency.

30 review for The Roots of Obama's Rage

  1. 5 out of 5

    Pat Herndon

    Rarely do I choose to read anything as partisan and pseudo-intellectual as this book. I was asked to go see the movie Obama 2016 and knew that I would not. Instead I decided to read the book upon which it was based and draw my own conclusions. Let me preface by saying that I have previously read Dreams from My Father and The Audacity of Hope. I have also read Janny Scott's, A Singular Woman, the biography of Obama's mother. I feel pretty comfortable in my basic understanding of Barack Obama's Rarely do I choose to read anything as partisan and pseudo-intellectual as this book. I was asked to go see the movie Obama 2016 and knew that I would not. Instead I decided to read the book upon which it was based and draw my own conclusions. Let me preface by saying that I have previously read Dreams from My Father and The Audacity of Hope. I have also read Janny Scott's, A Singular Woman, the biography of Obama's mother. I feel pretty comfortable in my basic understanding of Barack Obama's roots. D'Souza makes so many blatant distortions in his book that it borders on the absurd. His basic strategy is to define a theory, tell the reader to assume that it is true, then contort statements that have taken out of context and out of the bounds of sensible reason and use them to defend his supposed theory. That sounds scholarly, and I note that many reviewers on this site seem to believe that some sort of scholarly approach was taken in this book. This book is pseudo-scholarship and pseudo-intellectualism. It is really just pandering to paranoia and hatred. Somehow I keep getting a mental image of D'Souza, arms locked side-by-side with Rush Limbaugh, as they joyously walk into their bank to gleefully count the money that they make from their careers of spouting babble that incites not only a distrust of government, but a lack of respect for our entire system of government. The last few words in this book are ample evidence of my theory about this weird, weird book. And, I can't end this review without one more thought. To re-purpose a quote from Paul Krugman, I think that D'Souza's writing "is the stupid man's idea of what a smart person sounds like."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bernie

    Whether you are an Obama fan or not, The Roots of Obamas Rage is a must-read. I rarely give the full five stars but this is a ringer. Be sure to read the last chapter though, because if you agree with Obama about the evils of American and formerly European hegemony, DSouza delivers a potent rebuttal. In this book DSouza takes us back to Barak Obamas childhood and explores how his experiences and particularly his attachment to his father formulated his world view. This world view might be Whether you are an Obama fan or not, The Roots of Obama’s Rage is a must-read. I rarely give the full five stars but this is a ringer. Be sure to read the last chapter though, because if you agree with Obama about the evils of American and formerly European hegemony, D’Souza delivers a potent rebuttal. In this book D’Souza takes us back to Barak Obama’s childhood and explores how his experiences and particularly his attachment to his father formulated his world view. This world view might be summarized as anti-neo-colonialism. Of course this is not a particularly popular world view in mainstream America because the chief villain in this view is indeed America. Therefore, Mr. Obama has had to hide his views and couch them in ways that make them appear politically palatable. His world view comes, as Mr. Obama’s book itself declares, from Dreams from my Father. It’s not dreams of or to his father but specifically from his father. D’Souza asks himself this perceptive question: If Obama’s dreams come from his father, and he is carrying out those dreams, then what exactly are those dreams? His book is a quest to answer that question and thus explain his oftentimes strange behaviors and actions. And D’Souza’s thesis goes a long way toward explaining them. Saying that Obama is a closet Muslim extremist, as some hint, is way off the mark. Saying that Obama is the fulfillment of a long civil rights tradition in America obscures his objectives. Saying that Obama is a socialist is not a sufficient explanation. Only anti-neo-colonialism makes sense of it. And since we cannot actually know Mr. Obama’s thoughts, the value of any theory is in how specific actions conform to it and indeed its predictive power. D’Souza includes in his book three predictions about what Mr. Obama will do next. So what are some of the sometime inexplicable actions Obama has taken that can only adequately be explained by his fervent anti-neocolonialism? Here’s a list. • Why did Obama eventually reject Barry, the name everyone, including his father had called him since he was born? • Why is President Obama who is superb speaker, so careful to use to use his teleprompter even in front of school children? • Why does Obama find corporations and rich people particularly irritating? • Why has Obama tried to win friends in Europe and the “third world” by criticizing the US? • Why in one of his first actions as President, did Obama return a bust of Winston Churchill? • Why did Obama at first refuse to wear an American flag lapel pin? And why did he later “change” his mind? • Why did Obama secretly favor the release of Lockerbie bomber master-mind Al-Magrahi? • Why has Obama thoroughly distanced himself from any notion of American Exceptionalism? • Why has the administration actually refused attempts by banks to pay back Tarp funds? • Why did Obama use Tarp to take over GM and Chrysler? • Why during the oil spill crisis did Obama repeatedly refer to the oil company mostly known as BP as British Petroleum? • Why during the spill crisis instead of working to contain the problem did he repeatedly make reference to America’s “oil addiction”. • Why did he choose as Supreme Court justice a woman whose main allure seemed to be her decision to keep military recruiters off the Harvard campus? • Why would General McCrystal claim that in regards to the Afghanistan War, Obama “didn’t seem very engaged.”? • Why is Obama at best luke warm about America’s relationship with traditional ally, Israel? • Why has Obama been lackluster in efforts to dissuade Iran and N. Korea from developing nuclear weapons? • Where did Obama get his potent power to capture the attention of others, and to persuade them? • Why does Obama keep his distance from traditional liberal Black American civil rights leaders? • Why does Obama emphasize his solidarity both with Muslims and Christians? • Why is so little known about Obama’s time at Columbia, and to some extent, Harvard? • Given his father’s tragic death in a drunk driving accident, why does Mr. Obama seemingly ignore this issue? • Why did Obama enter into relationships with the radicals, Reverend Wright and Bill Ayers? • Why has Obama made subservient bows to several world leaders? • What was behind Obama’s suggestion to Joe the Plumber that he “share the wealth”? • How does his Cap and Trade proposals square with his idea of sharing the wealth? • Why, despite the fact that Social Security and the Great Society Programs had wide bi-partisan support did Obama insist on pushing through the health care legislation with absolutely no Republican support? • Why was the Norwegian Parliament so quick to confer the Nobel Peace prize to a president, who had of yet done absolutely nothing to further the cause of peace? • Why did Obama strike a tone of moral equivalency by noting to the Turks, who had massacred thousand of Armenians that we’ve had trouble in our treatment of Native Americans. • Why did Obama abandon Checkeslovakia and Poland in reneging on our promise to deploy antimissile defenses there? • Why did he work so hard to negotiate a largely irrelevant nuclear reduction treaty with the Russians? • Why did Obama, despite his belief at the time that Iraq actually did have weapons of mass destruction opine against the Iraq war? • Why did Obama direct his NASA chief to make its primary mission not to explore space but to improve relations with the Muslim world? • Why is increased taxes on the rich the main way Obama plans to tackle the deficits he is largely responsible for? I could go on…… but please, read the book. 

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    Book Review The Roots of Obamas Rage, by Dinesh DSouza Dinesh DSouza wrote The Roots of Obamas Rage to demean, dishonor, and denigrate Barack Obama. Its appropriate that the dust jacket has tints of blood red because its a political hatchet-job. It might dismay Mr. DSouza to learn his diatribe actually had the opposite affect on me: It gave me a clearer understanding and greater respect for the transcending mission that has driven the President: combatting exploitation. That this book has come to Book Review The Roots of Obama’s Rage, by Dinesh D’Souza Dinesh D’Souza wrote The Roots of Obama’s Rage to demean, dishonor, and denigrate Barack Obama. It’s appropriate that the dust jacket has tints of blood red because it’s a political hatchet-job. It might dismay Mr. D’Souza to learn his diatribe actually had the opposite affect on me: It gave me a clearer understanding and greater respect for the transcending mission that has driven the President: combatting exploitation. That this book has come to provide the talking points for so many influential conservatives in 2012 is reason enough to read it, nay, study it. In my case, a politically conservative---ultra conservative, actually--friend encouraged me to read it. So, here goes! That so many of these devout conservatives actually believe what D’Souza has written is both frightening and a tragedy, a triumph of dogma over rational thought and logical appraisal. D’Souza’s work can be sliced at least two ways for analysis: his conclusions and his technique of exposition. His conclusions are not confirmed by his chosen evidence. His techniques are those of a demagogue. First, the book in one sentence: D’Souza says Barack; Obama adopted as his own the anti-colonial rage of his Kenyan father. Furthermore, all inexplicable and allegedly Anti-American, anti-capitalist actions and inactions by Obama can be explained logically if seen through this anti-colonial lens. The book is seriously flawed by its reliance on a parade of “non sequiturs.” While his conservative choir joyfully sings “amen,” the uncommitted and critical seeker of truth should be left asking, again and again,” How do you conclude that?” for D’Souza doesn’t merely hide his unfounded half-truths with weak citations of weaker-yet gossip that few readers will examine for reliability, he expands upon them for paragraph upon paragraph, as though adding volume to unwarranted conclusions makes them stronger. D’Souza is also not above character assassination and mud-slinging to denigrate Obama’s parents—--and, thereby, him—--in the apparent assumption that this verbal slash-and-burn would undermine the morality or validity of the Obamas’ (father, mother, and son) world view. Do I exaggerate? I report. You decide. “His dad was, after all, a complete jerk,” D’Souza says on page 64, appraising Obama Sr.’s serial marriages, abandonment of children, and alcoholism—serious negatives, to be sure. But are they germane to an appraisal of a political philosophy? The President’s mother knew all those sordid facts, yet still revered Obama Sr.’s political championing of the exploited. And of her, D’Souza writes with glib condemnation: “She, too, was a strange one, and her strangeness derives, in part from her own parents … they named her “Stanley”… yes, Stanley … the poor thing … [She] grew up in Kansas, where, like Dorothy, she developed a fascination with the great big world out there … [She] had a romantic attraction to everything that was dark and strange and unlike her white-bread upbringing in the Midwest … [Her] undiscriminating judgment is part of the reason she fell so gullibly for Obama’s father” (page 74). The allusion to Dorothy is a crude attempt to paint Obama’s mother as living in another Kansas-borne Oz-like fantasy world; the allusion to dark a cruder implication of abnormal and unacceptable sexual tastes. Swinging this rhetorical club says nothing about Obama’s politics. It is an irrelevant and snide put-down, a verbal Christian thrown to the lions to bring a blood-lust roar from the conservative crowd. It’s rather like criticizing Stephen King for being trailer park trash because he lived a lowly mobile home while writing his earliest books, or trying to invalidate the impact of France’s King Henri IV because he fathered illegitimate children---irrelevant character assassination. At the core of D’Souza’s rant is the charge that Obama Sr. hated what he saw European colonial powers doing to Africans, was a virulent anti-colonialist (and therefore socialist), and that Obama Jr. adopted this “dream from his father.” D’Souza goes to great lengths to ferret-out the writings of Obama Sr. and a long line of other anti-colonial, socialist-leaning political philosophers who mentored and molded our president’s intellect and life-mission, concluding that it’s all very anti-American. D’Souza is correct in this if one subscribes to D’Souza’s apparent definition of American as being pro-corporation, pro-imperialism, and pro-exploitation. And there it is: the broader evil that D’Souza misses completely: exploitation. He begins this book by saying it represents his third attempt to figure Obama out, and that when he finally realized it was anti-colonialism that tied all the incongruences together, it was an epiphany. He then sets out to describe how candidate Obama and President Obama hid their true intentions, infiltrated organizations, adopted both white and black behavior, and tricked us all so he could take over our government, defang it, and turn it into his own, personal force for global anti-colonialism. D’Souza reminds me of the guy who invented WD-38 and WD-39 and then quit. He needed to keep looking for the answer. He failed to realize that the “dream from his father” that motivates Obama is not so narrow a thing as anti-colonialism. It is anti-exploitation in any form. And it comes in so many forms: exploitation of garment factory workers in Pakistan; exploitation of Mexican workers on U.S. farms and Iowa packing houses; exploitation of taxpayers bailing out Wall Street; exploitation of Iraqi oil wells by U.S. and European oil companies; exploitation of jobless young Americans so they will serve in uniform; exploitation of Wal-Mart workers; exploitation of the tax code by the wealthy; and yes, exploitation of Africans. Colonialism was merely the old-fashion, military-backed form of it. D’Souza writes (page 215), “The blunt truth is anti-colonialism is dead; no one in today’s world cares about it--except the man in the White House.” It’s a typical D’Souza missing of the point and then expanding on it with literary swagger. He couldn’t very well assert that anti-exploitation is dead, even if it is more accurate. It wouldn’t fit his intentionally-myopic argument. “The rest of the world [meaning everyone but Obama] has no interest in … how British officials in Kenya used to beat their house servants with canes,” he writes. He even finds a passage to quote that suggests colonialism was actually a good thing, anyway, and that the countries that suffered British colonialism the longest are now the best-off. “Today with the balance and perspective offered by the passage of time,” said Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, “it is possible … to assert that India’s experience with Britain had its beneficial consequences. Our notions of the rule of law, of a constitutional government, of a free press, of a professional civil service, of modern universities and research laboratories have all been fashioned in the crucible where an age-old civilization met the dominant empire of the day.” So, in contrast, D’Souza adds, “A strong case can be made that Africa’s problem isn’t colonialism, but too little colonialism.” There is no getting around it: D’Souza is saying the ends justify the means. Let us not forget that some good things came out of Carnegie’s exploitation of Pittsburgh steel workers at gunpoint. Some good things came out of the Germany of the 1930s, too. Do we say, therefore, exploitation is good? When Obama rails against Goldman-Sachs, he is not doing so---in my studied opinion---so as to grab control for the sake of becoming an anti-capitalist dictator, as alleged by D’Souza and his right-wing friends. He’s doing it to champion both the middle class and the lower classes against exploitation by corporate and financial powers. And it is this---not Obama’s serving as a symbol of racial absolution, erasing guilt for white America, as D’Souza suggests---that appeals to so many sectors of the American electorate. Rather, those in the 99% don’t like exploitation, either. When Obama tells the French or the Egyptians that we aren’t going to be the arrogant, exploitive country that we have been in the past, he’s not apologizing for America. He’s telling it like it is, and as those exploited people have seen it for centuries. He’s saying, “I get it. Exploitation is wrong and we all know it.” D’Souza has also written a book entitled “What’s So Great About Christianity.” (There is no question-mark in the title.) So here is the big question for D’Souza: If you really believe in Christian doctrine---whose “primary directive” is to do unto others as you would have others do unto you---how can you really believe that colonialism, or exploitation of any sort, is acceptable, even as a means to an end? Is it not possible to have powerful, enlightening influence on a lesser-developed country by means of a shining example, rather than roughshod colonial exploitation? Cannot the proceeds of development and economic activity in a foreign land (or this one) be shared fairly? Must we have continued exploitation? Must we have Dinesh D’Souza’s world?

  4. 5 out of 5

    Denise Louise

    I mostly read this book to see if I could understand the roots of the rage against Obama, as I don't see as much rage in the President as I do in his opposition. The book began in a seemingly logical fashion, but pretty quickly degenerated into a lot of the normal rhetoric. It's difficult to take the author seriously when any actions by Obama that don't fit his theory are written off as a smokescreen by a manipulative genius. You can prove any theory you want if you ignore all evidence that I mostly read this book to see if I could understand the roots of the rage against Obama, as I don't see as much rage in the President as I do in his opposition. The book began in a seemingly logical fashion, but pretty quickly degenerated into a lot of the normal rhetoric. It's difficult to take the author seriously when any actions by Obama that don't fit his theory are written off as a smokescreen by a manipulative genius. You can prove any theory you want if you ignore all evidence that doesn't suit it. As for being an anti-colonialist, probably Obama is. So am I, as I grew up in the same time period and learned the same lessons of history. It doesn't then follow that he's out to destroy America. Even when the author acknowledges that the President had done something he agrees with, he suggests his reasons for doing it are sinister. Sheesh, no wonder we can't make any progress in our government. So, I'm still not more afraid of Obama than I am of far right conservatives.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    After hearing the buzz about the movie "2016," and knowing I would have a hard time attending, I went to the book to learn what D'Souza had to say about Barack Obama's 4 years in office. Born in Hawaii, just 2 yrs after it became the last state in the union, Obama was surrounded by the heated resentment of locals still smarting from the forceful military take over of the Hawaiian Islands under President McKinley. His mother remarried an Indonesian who paid lip service to her anti-colonial views After hearing the buzz about the movie "2016," and knowing I would have a hard time attending, I went to the book to learn what D'Souza had to say about Barack Obama's 4 years in office. Born in Hawaii, just 2 yrs after it became the last state in the union, Obama was surrounded by the heated resentment of locals still smarting from the forceful military take over of the Hawaiian Islands under President McKinley. His mother remarried an Indonesian who paid lip service to her anti-colonial views (also shared by Obama Sr.) and moved the family to Indonesia where young Barry Obama witnessed passionate marital battles betweent his mother and step-father accusing his step-father of "selling-out" to the white, rich, expatriots living in Indonesia, rather than raging against the colonial machine. Obama writes these details in his first memoir, "Dreams from my Father." He talks about how his mother taught him to idolize his absent father, whom he remembers meeting only once, when at the age of ten, Obama Sr. visited him in Hawaii and spoke to his class dressed as a tribesman from Kenya. Obama Sr.spoke the language of Hawaiian resentment, blaming the big bad colonial ambition of countries like the US and Great Britain that expanded their empires at the expense of the natives. For chubby Barry Obama, his father's appearance at school gave him miles of "coolness" and acceptance, and deepened his devotion and hero worship of his father. Again, this is strait from Obama's own memoir. As a young man, Obama sought out professors who shared the anti-colonialist sentiments of his parents, including Roberto Unger and Edward Said, and the controversial pastor Jeremiah Wright. Unger refused to give interviews during the last election b/c he "didn't want to affect Obama's electability." After quoting extensively from Obama's memoirs, D'Souza then insightfully explains how the ideology of Obama's father has played out in the Oval Office. The punch-line is that Obama views the military as arms of colonialism; big business and Americans in general are major resource consumers, much like Imperial nations drain the resources of the nations it occupies, America drains the earth's resources. Because we're essentially the gluttons of the earth, America owes major--billions of dollars--in subsidies to third world countries who haven't had a chance to consume like we have. One of the many examples D'Souza uses to illustrate his point is Obama's moratorium on US oil drilling, while subsidizing Brazilian oil to the tune of 90 Billion dollars. Another is the quick retreat from Iraq, and Obama's refusal to send a full surge of forces to decisively win the war in Afghanistan. The "Gluttons of the earth" mentality also explains Obama's constant attack on "the rich" who don't pay "their fair share." Ironic point of view considering that the bottom 40% of America's population pay nothing in taxes, while the top 1% pay 40% of America's taxes. Obama Sr. was an economist who essentially espoused a communist take-over of government. Obama Jr. has enacted a similar view of gov't by the stranglehold he placed on Wall Street Banks forcing several to take bail-out money, and refusing to accept payment from others who wanted out. Why? B/c he wants control of the banks. Same mentality towards the auto makers of Detroit who deserved to go under. But Obama bailed them out and took control. Then he took control of insurance by literally pushing through "nationalized health care" known as Obama Care. Bottom line: D'Souza paints a grim picture of Obama's hidden agenda, which has baffled pundants and critics, but is easily explained through the lens of Anti-colonialism. He predicts that if Obama wins a second term in office, America will be on the verge of financial collapse (Obama has out-spent Bush, and that's NOT including TARP bailouts), and America's standard of living will plummet; Iran and North Korea will have nuclear weapons (Obama refuses to do anything overt to curtail these nations' pursuit of nuclear arms), and with reduced military and defense, America will no longer be the world's watch-dog, but rather a second-level nation equal with Great Britain, creating a world environment where rogue nations run wild. D'Souza asserts that if Americans knew what this guy was really all about, he wouldn't be the most powerful man in the world. D'Souza claims a unique commonality with Obama: he was born in the same year, in India, a nation colonized by the British.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Im not buying the anti-colonialism argument. It requires psychoanalyzing Mr. Obama, something that I dont think Mr DSouza is qualified to do. Besides that, why is there an effort to find some secret motivation for the Presidents policies when Conservatives ought to be able to argue Conservative principles compared to traditionally Liberal ones? For that, I would rate this book very low. In addition, one of my pet peeves, on page 197, Mr. DSouza repeats the incomplete statistics surrounding the I’m not buying the anti-colonialism argument. It requires psychoanalyzing Mr. Obama, something that I don’t think Mr D’Souza is qualified to do. Besides that, why is there an effort to find some secret motivation for the President’s policies when Conservatives ought to be able to argue Conservative principles compared to traditionally Liberal ones? For that, I would rate this book very low. In addition, one of my pet peeves, on page 197, Mr. D’Souza repeats the incomplete statistics surrounding the tax burden at the high income levels. He states that the top 1% pay 40% of the taxes—true, but what he doesn’t say is that the top 1% have almost 20% of the share of income. Still skewed toward the rich having a higher tax burden, by why not state the whole truth? He also states that if you make $1 million, then you pay $375,000 in taxes. I can’t get to that number looking at the tax rate schedules. The highest incremental tax rate is 35%, and that is on income over $373,650. If you don’t include personal exemptions and the hypothetical taxpayer has not one single dollar of itemized deductions (high unlikely), I can only get to approximately $325,000 in federal income taxes. Still very high, but not $375,000. Both political ends of the spectrum like to pick and choose their facts, but isn’t your argument stronger if you present the complete story? All of the skewed presentations play on Americans’ lack of understanding about how their taxes actually work. I’m so tired of sound bites which are incomplete. I actually have about 50 more pages to read, but don't think my opinion will change very much.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Intellectual, clear, methodical analysis of Obamas influences, agendas, and behaviors Having recently read Edward Kleins The Amateur (and having liked it, despite its short length and superficial content), I was struck by just how intellectual, methodical, clear and thoughtful this book is. DSouza takes the reader through a very systematic approach of analyzing Obamas influences from childhood to the present and using them to explain his actions and words throughout his life, and even to predict Intellectual, clear, methodical analysis of Obama’s influences, agendas, and behaviors Having recently read Edward Klein’s The Amateur (and having liked it, despite its short length and superficial content), I was struck by just how intellectual, methodical, clear and thoughtful this book is. D’Souza takes the reader through a very systematic approach of analyzing Obama’s influences from childhood to the present and using them to explain his actions and words throughout his life, and even to predict his future agenda. D’Souza, documenting every citation carefully, uses many sources, including (and especially) Obama’s own books, to help shape this analysis. D’Souza also relies on the context of Obama’s life, environment, and relationships to help illuminate many ideas (even at times using his own similar “minority/foreigner” upbringing to help further expound on these ideas). This is by far the most interesting and insightful analysis of Obama I’ve read to date, be it in books, magazines, or any other source. I recommend this eye-opener for readers across the entire political spectrum: for conservatives to truly understand what is behind the man, and for liberals to stop and question with intellectual honesty whether this man is truly representing the values they hold—yes, even the liberal values that they think he represents, and of course, most importantly, for those independents in the middle of the spectrum who are simply seeking to truly understand who they are voting for before casting their vote.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Adam Ross

    This was a haunting, spell-binding book. I am not a neo-con like D'Souza, but I picked up this book almost by accident and couldn't resist the opportunity to read an account of Obama the man from another minority with a biography so close to Obama's own. With a title like this, complete with the glaring picture of a frowning Obama on the front cover, I was worried that the book would be nothing but more empty polemic. Thank goodness that assumption was not true. In fact, I can't think of a more This was a haunting, spell-binding book. I am not a neo-con like D'Souza, but I picked up this book almost by accident and couldn't resist the opportunity to read an account of Obama the man from another minority with a biography so close to Obama's own. With a title like this, complete with the glaring picture of a frowning Obama on the front cover, I was worried that the book would be nothing but more empty polemic. Thank goodness that assumption was not true. In fact, I can't think of a more mis-titled and mis-marketed book in contemporary politics, and the likely responsibility for the mischaracterization falls no doubt on Regnery and not D'Souza. I am not sure my experience of the book will be the same as a conservative who reads it because they are petrified by Obama's policies. Such a person is likely to consider the exploration of Obama's past as simply "knowing the enemy." For me, it was the first time I felt as though I have truly understood Obama the man. The book is predominantly a biography of Obama's pre-political life, and that life is haunting, heart-breaking, and in many ways a beautiful tragedy. Reading the book, I could not help but feel a great swell of compassion for Obama the man. The reason? D'Souza's thesis is that Obama has been driven his entire life by the specter of his absent father, a man who grew to larger-than-life proportions in the mind of his son. It is the story of a quest - Obama's quest to reject his American-European side, and a quest to discover his father, and to honor that vacant man by adopting his Africanism, his ideology, and his dream for the world. This father-hunger on Obama's part drove him to the heart of Kenya to his father's grave, and it drove him to seek power, to accomplish the failed dreams of his father. Now that is a heart-rending story if there ever was one. To be honest, it is almost Shakespearian. D'Souza writes that "Obama never knew his father, who abandoned his mother and him shortly after he was born, and whom he met only once when he was a young boy. Even so, Obama identified more with his father than anyone else, and he undertook an intense psychological and ultimately actual journey to Africa in order to discover his dad and in the process to find himself. Unable to find his father, he did the next best thing: he embraced his father's ideals and decided to live out the script of his father's unfulfilled life. Obama ultimately recognized that his father was not the great romantic he had long envisioned him to be. But Obama concluded that despite his flaws, his father had great vision, great ideals, a great plan of reform. Since Obama Sr. was unable to achieve those ideals, Obama Jr. figured he would undertake this heroic mission. In changing the world into the image of his father, he would complete the task his father couldn't, and thus he would become worthy of his father, a real African and a real man," (27). The chief theme D'Souza sees Obama taking from his father was his father's anti-colonial Africanism, a view that the West's colonization of Africa was an act of oppression and theft and pillage of the Africans. Ultimately, I am in many ways sympathetic to this myself and thus found myself in the strange position of being an anti-Obama-ite, reading a book by another anti-Obama-ite, but agreeing more with Obama's central complaint about the West than not, whilst disagreeing with the conclusions of both Obama and D'Souza. It kinda made my head go cross-eyed. Anyway, D'Souza shows that his theory that Obama's anti-colonial sympathies have explanatory power of Obama's often strange actions as President, down into the details, and he proves his case pretty well. He points out that most everybody who heard about it were baffled by Obama's decision to return the bust of Winston Churchill that was on display in the White House back to the British. He then points out that this makes perfect sense if Obama saw Churchill through third-world eyes - not as the defender of liberty against the Nazis, but rather as the oppressor of Africans in British colonies in Africa. Churchill, you see, put down an African rebellion and arrested thousands of innocent African men, including Obama's father and grandfather, and quashed the dreams of Obama's father, who wanted a Kenya independent of British rule. Ahh, now it makes sense! Perfect, almost eerie, sense. D'Souza then proceeds to show how Obama's policies are all oriented not towards themselves, but towards the ultimate goal of anti-colonialism, of shrinking and taming the influence of the great imperial power in the world (America), of preventing our country from continuing the reign of American empire around the world. It explains why he curtailed America's nuclear missile arenal and off-shore oil drilling, while being unconcerned with Iran's acquisition of nuclear missiles, and encouraging Brazil to proceed with offshore drilling. It's all about slowing the growth of the American colonization machine, and letting the have-nots have a little more for themselves. Now, I'm not saying I agree with Obama's decisions, or indeed with the "solutions" presented by a neo-con like D'Souza, but I am saying that I feel that, for the first time, I have the measure of Obama the man. When I listen to him talk now, I will be able to hear a human being, a broken, wounded human being who has locked his pain up far away inside. America, D'Souza concludes, is not being ruled by Obama, but by his father. "Reflect for a moment on the title of his book: its not Dreams of My Father but rather Dreams From My Father. In other words, Obama is not writing a book about his father's dreams; he is writing about the dreams that he got from his father. Think about what this means. The most powerful country in the world is being governed according to the dreams of a Luo tribesman of the 1950s . . . this philandering, inebriated African socialist is now setting the nation's agenda through the reincarnation of his dreams in his son. ... The invisible father provides the inspiration, and the son dutifully gets the job done. America today is being governed by a ghost," (198).

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    In a mass of anti-Obama books, Dinesh D'Souza has clearly done the best job of getting to his real motivation. I'd be surprised if anyone could finish this book and not be convinced of the anti-colonial Obama agenda. D'Souza's theory is based on Obama's own words and stories about his past. Anti-colonialism holds the explanatory and predictive power that other critics have lacked by citing Marxism, Islam, or any other motivator. Obama didn't become president to help people live the American In a mass of anti-Obama books, Dinesh D'Souza has clearly done the best job of getting to his real motivation. I'd be surprised if anyone could finish this book and not be convinced of the anti-colonial Obama agenda. D'Souza's theory is based on Obama's own words and stories about his past. Anti-colonialism holds the explanatory and predictive power that other critics have lacked by citing Marxism, Islam, or any other motivator. Obama didn't become president to help people live the American dream. He became president to execute HIS FATHER'S dream ("Dreams FROM My Father") of vastly reducing the power and influence of the big bad colonial United States. His policies haven't failed to make us a stronger country because that is not his goal. His policies have succeeded in weakening the U.S. in defense and economics, while beginning a transfer of wealth from the American rich to those less well-off (skyrocketing food-stamp recipients, etc), and from globally from richer to developing countries. This book is thoroughly researched, footnoted, and documented. I'm looking forward to reading D'Souza's new book, Obama's America.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    This was an extremely interesting book. Regardless of your politics, you should enjoy reading this fascinating analysis of Obama's motivations as a person and a politician. The book quickly and succinctly presents all of the key moments in Obama's personal life - much of it in his own words - as well as his political life and assesses the experiences through the prism of mid-20th century anti-colonialism. The book is filled with literally hundreds of quotes, anecdotes, and events that will make This was an extremely interesting book. Regardless of your politics, you should enjoy reading this fascinating analysis of Obama's motivations as a person and a politician. The book quickly and succinctly presents all of the key moments in Obama's personal life - much of it in his own words - as well as his political life and assesses the experiences through the prism of mid-20th century anti-colonialism. The book is filled with literally hundreds of quotes, anecdotes, and events that will make you know the President of the United States much better than you thought you knew him. I followed this book by a quick search of the ultra-liberal "Media Matters" web site to read their response to it. It was very interesting to read some of their critiques which basically centered around a handful of factual errors including dates and names. But they had zero response to the general thesis of the book other than simply stating, "Obama is not anti-colonialist." I would like to have seen them try to disprove the thesis with the same rigor with which D'Souza attempts to prove it. I would add that the fact that the Media Matters web site was only able to discredit such a small number of points from the book, is actually a real credit to D'Souza and speaks to the validity of the remaining 95% of the material he presents.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michael Robinson

    Wow...What an eye opening book! The author, Dinesh D'Sousa starts presenting a theory as to what drives Obama deep down and then, like a good prosecuting attorney, presents his case very thoroughly and methodically. Moreover, he also examines other popular theories to explain the enigmatic and secretive Barack Obama, and then proceeds to illustrate the flaws and shortcomings in these lenses. I felt like I was on a journey with a good investigator traveling the globe, and retracing the steps of Wow...What an eye opening book! The author, Dinesh D'Sousa starts presenting a theory as to what drives Obama deep down and then, like a good prosecuting attorney, presents his case very thoroughly and methodically. Moreover, he also examines other popular theories to explain the enigmatic and secretive Barack Obama, and then proceeds to illustrate the flaws and shortcomings in these lenses. I felt like I was on a journey with a good investigator traveling the globe, and retracing the steps of Obama who in earlier years was on a similar journey searching for answers about his own father, Obama Sr. D'Sousa includes the reader on the journey with him. It was like I was with the author after finding a piece of the puzzle would say, "Here look at this, this is important." There is an important difference between D'Sousa's journey and the earlier journey the young Obama traveled. Both journeys have the discovery element in common. Obama's journey resembles a pilgrimage of a son walking in the footsteps of his mythical father figure whereas D'Sousa's journey one of a cold case private investigator who is seeking answers about motive and intent of a suspect. Amazing read. If you are looking for political zingers, this book doesn't have any. If you want to explore what drives Obama, read this book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kirstie

    I've often found Obama's actions confusing. It's hard to figure out what his agenda is. Why does he support off shore drilling off of Brazil but not the U.S.? Why is he hard nosed about his aunt being in the U.S. illegally but not about Arizona's immigration reform? Reading this book sheds some light on the motives behind some of Obama's actions. I think the author makes a compelling argument that Obama is making decisions based upon an anti-colonial sentiment. This may seem like a strange I've often found Obama's actions confusing. It's hard to figure out what his agenda is. Why does he support off shore drilling off of Brazil but not the U.S.? Why is he hard nosed about his aunt being in the U.S. illegally but not about Arizona's immigration reform? Reading this book sheds some light on the motives behind some of Obama's actions. I think the author makes a compelling argument that Obama is making decisions based upon an anti-colonial sentiment. This may seem like a strange argument to make in America, but the author pulls on much of what Obama himself wrote in "Dreams from My Father" and the author's own experience growing up in India. The anti-colonial arguments explains why people have such a hard time figuring Obama out (both his supporters and opposition). No one in America views our political system in regards to anti-colonialism, and many in America don't believe that America has ever been a part of colonialism. The author does an excellent job of explaining how Obama inherited from his father the view that America is involved in perpetuating neo-colonialism by continuing to use resources and services from lesser developed countries for profit.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    A lot of Americans are trying to figure out just who is the President and I think this guy may have nailed it down & it's as bad as we have feared...it's also proof that perhaps some people really shouldn't be allowed to pro-create! We are being led by a man who idolizes his dead father who left him while he was a toddler, re-appeared for a few days & died years later, in Africa, in a drunk driving accident that he caused. In the meantime, he fathered several other children with at least A lot of Americans are trying to figure out just who is the President and I think this guy may have nailed it down & it's as bad as we have feared...it's also proof that perhaps some people really shouldn't be allowed to pro-create! We are being led by a man who idolizes his dead father who left him while he was a toddler, re-appeared for a few days & died years later, in Africa, in a drunk driving accident that he caused. In the meantime, he fathered several other children with at least 2 other women & rambled on about the "evil colonialist America." D'Souza picks apart several of Obama's actions & words and carefully cites the whole thing - kind of like many of the research papers I did while in college earning my B.S. in Social Studies Composite.

  14. 4 out of 5

    John

    I did not want to put this book down. Mr D'Souza is Indian but writes a captivating English text. Word of warning: If your rating of our current president's administration is very positive, you should not read this book. Dinesh D'Souza finds an interpretation of President Obama's otherwise incongruous decisions and actions. D'Souza provides a view of Obama's administration that wipes away the ambiguity of seemingly disconnected and contradictory approaches in Presidential Leadership. If you are I did not want to put this book down. Mr D'Souza is Indian but writes a captivating English text. Word of warning: If your rating of our current president's administration is very positive, you should not read this book. Dinesh D'Souza finds an interpretation of President Obama's otherwise incongruous decisions and actions. D'Souza provides a view of Obama's administration that wipes away the ambiguity of seemingly disconnected and contradictory approaches in Presidential Leadership. If you are less politically dedicated to far left agendas and less admiring of presidential prerogative you might absolutely enjoy this book. The far right will say, 'Amen.' Whatever that means.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    This interpretation of Barak Obama, written very thoughtfully and carefully by D'Souza, is a must read for every American. Whether or not you support Obama, this book clarifies many of Obama's statements, flash points, seeming disengagement, and actions (the return of Churchill's bust to Britain, as an example). D'Souza theorizes, and then supports said theory, that Obama is a anti-colonialist, following in the footsteps of the father he hardly knew. I still don't agree with Obama or his This interpretation of Barak Obama, written very thoughtfully and carefully by D'Souza, is a must read for every American. Whether or not you support Obama, this book clarifies many of Obama's statements, flash points, seeming disengagement, and actions (the return of Churchill's bust to Britain, as an example). D'Souza theorizes, and then supports said theory, that Obama is a anti-colonialist, following in the footsteps of the father he hardly knew. I still don't agree with Obama or his policies (or those of his supporters), but it sure has given me greater insight into several things that have heretofore baffled me.

  16. 4 out of 5

    MG

    Just finished reading "Root's of Obama's Rage" by Dinesh D'Souza... thanks, Wolf, for recommending this book! WOW. (For you lefties, it's not what you think: it's an analysis of how Obama Sr. and his Anti-Colonialist world view shaped the world view of his son.) It's a very, very well-written book. D'Souza, a native of Mumbai, has a a unique first-hand perspective on colonialism, and offers some interesting arguments that someone without his unique history can not. D'Souza was also very thorough Just finished reading "Root's of Obama's Rage" by Dinesh D'Souza... thanks, Wolf, for recommending this book! WOW. (For you lefties, it's not what you think: it's an analysis of how Obama Sr. and his Anti-Colonialist world view shaped the world view of his son.) It's a very, very well-written book. D'Souza, a native of Mumbai, has a a unique first-hand perspective on colonialism, and offers some interesting arguments that someone without his unique history can not. D'Souza was also very thorough in his research for the book, especially in terms of the Mau Mau situation which gave rise to Obama Sr.'s anti-colonialist viewpoints. Open your mind: give the book a read. You won't regret it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    John Sibley

    OBAMA'S DEFINING MOMENT AND DINESH'S D'SOUZA'S TIRADE The way President Obama handled the debt ceiling crisis sheds more light on his political choices [ fight or flight ] and political ideology than speculating about his multicultural politics in his youth. The debt ceiling debacle totally discredits D' Souza's thesis that a grass root organizer from Chicago, elected president of the United States , political modus operandi is based on some exoctic Socialist Marxist stew he has gulped down OBAMA'S DEFINING MOMENT AND DINESH'S D'SOUZA'S TIRADE The way President Obama handled the debt ceiling crisis sheds more light on his political choices [ fight or flight ] and political ideology than speculating about his multicultural politics in his youth. The debt ceiling debacle totally discredits D' Souza's thesis that a grass root organizer from Chicago, elected president of the United States , political modus operandi is based on some exoctic Socialist Marxist stew he has gulped down since childhood. I think by President Obama NOT using the 14th amendment which reaffirms the United States paying its debts proves he is a tepid, passive, and non-confrontational president. Not bold. But indecisive and fearful. Why was he so afraid of using the 14th amendment as leverage? Was it out of fear of the GOP impeaching him? Or was it out of fear of a conservative Supreme Court hearing the case. Even though most legal scholars say the Supreme Court would not even hear the case because of a lack of legal ' standing ' .But why wasn't the president passive with his giving the ' bullet in the head ' order to kill the Somali pirates? Or Osama bin Laden? Were they killed because they were terrorist in addition to proving his political toughness? I think we can discern more about Obama's political ideology via his recent political decisions than digging up his old library reading list in high school and college. D'Souza portrays Obama as a closet Marxist, Socialist but Obama has proven over and over again that he doesn't have the stomachs or temperment for radical change despite his campaigner promises. Instead of using his executive power to squash the tea parties attempt to hold the debt ceiling negotiations as a ' hostage ' bargaining tool. " With a stroke of Lincoln's pen ",as Rep.Jim Clyburn (D-S.C.) said on MSNBC " tell me the bill number of the Emancipation Proclamation. It was an executive order. We integrated the armed services by executive order. We intergrated public schools by executive order. Some times executives must order things get done." President Obama is too much of a political insider to have any radical leanings. After reading " The Roots Of Obama's Rage " by Dinesh D'Souza I was astonished how both of us could deconstruct his personality from a ' third world ' prism. I used the same ' colonized mind ' model on an article I wrote that was published in the Chicago Reader in 1995 titled " Obama's Myopia " . I used the same dissection knife to expose his incredible naivete in understanding the institutional generational poverty of inner-city city blacks. A lack of understanding that strikes me as full of contradictions when one considers his intellectual thirst for philosophy and constitutional law. It, virtually impossible to read those kind of books without understanding the societal dynamics of socialism and capitalism? In Souza's book he states, " Obama is influenced by a rich me`lange of political and intellectual figures from across the globe. We discover names like Jomo Kenyatta, Tom Mboya,Kwame Nkrumah, Chinua Achebe, Frantz Fanon ". Obama is a multiculturalist and Internationalist in his political philosophy, unlike his father , an African Socialist, in fact, just recently the University Professor Cornell West called him " a black puppet of corporate plutocrats " based on his indifference to the plight of the poor and disenfranchised especially the highyer unemployment rate for blacks and the estimated 160 billion dollars in loss equity and the 80% incarceration rate of blacks in prisons. As Alan Keyes a former Republican candidate for the Illinois U.S. Senate said in an Ebony magazine essay: " The black elite point to the mere fact [Obama] of his racial heritage as the basis for supporting his bid for power. It will seem that like the architects of segregation and prejudice in the past, black people too are willing to exploit the false premise of racial solidarity in order to serve their lust for power." Dinesh D'Souza's book was informative yet I dissagree with him using Kenyan-anri-colonialism as the driving force of Obama's personality. That is like saying because Arnold Swartneggars's father was a Brown Shirt [ the enforcement wing of the Nazi Party ]. Somehow does that makes Governor Swartneggar a Nazi symphathizer? President Obama is too much of a conservative capitalist ------proven by his bailout of Wallstreet at the expense of mainstreet should erase any lingering doubts of any Marxists leanings. Recently on a Sunday talk show Republican Presidential candidate Newt Gingrich stated that D'Sousa's book depicting Obama as -------" Kenyan and anti-colonial was brilliant." D'Souza's thesis is based on the mid-1960s Marxist inspired Kenyan anti-colonialism. What he overlooked is that Obama is an enigmatic president, almost Spock-like in his cerebral demeanor but certainly not socialist but an obedient servant of Wallstreet capitalist and unlike his socialist father he has no qualms with free-market-capitalism. His political philosophy has more kinship with his father's rival Jomo Kenyatta, who spear headed the freedom movement in Kenya which was grounded in a pro- Western free market ideology. In closing I grew up during the Civil Rights era on the Westside of Chicago and the south suburbs. Obama grew up in Hawai and Indonesia, enrolled in private schools before attending Columbia and Harvard. My back ground is mostly bluecollar. I am a product of the school of hard knocks.Nothing was exoctic about my childhood in Chicago. Obama's DNA is not from the descendants of slaves as mine is.His father was from the Lou tribe in Kenya. My father picked cotton in Greenville Mississippi and his father was a rebellious preacher in the South fleeing because of threats of lynching with his family to the North. So what does President Obama have in common with me and black America? Virtually nothing---------excuse me I almost forgot music and basketball. FINIS

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mazola1

    The Roots of Obama's Rage reveals more about the rage of the Christian right towards Obama than Obama's supposed rage against America. D'Souza, the guy who frequently debates the atheist in those debates about the existence of God, takes it as a given that Obama wants to destroy America, and puts forth an intriguing but illogical explanation for Obama's alleged hatred of the country he leads. D'Souza theorizes that Obama was indoctrinated with anti colonialism by his Kenyan father. It's a neat The Roots of Obama's Rage reveals more about the rage of the Christian right towards Obama than Obama's supposed rage against America. D'Souza, the guy who frequently debates the atheist in those debates about the existence of God, takes it as a given that Obama wants to destroy America, and puts forth an intriguing but illogical explanation for Obama's alleged hatred of the country he leads. D'Souza theorizes that Obama was indoctrinated with anti colonialism by his Kenyan father. It's a neat little theory that falls afoul of the facts. In advancing this theory, D'Souza makes some remarkable and explosive observations. D'Souza calls Obama "certainly the least-know figure ever to reach the presidency', and "a strange, complex man." Considering the fact that we know more about Obama's formative years and the early influences on his life than we do about most Presidents, thanks to his incredibly revealing autobiographical book Dreams From My Father, what D'Souza would actually seem to be writing about is the feeling some on the right have on that Obama is somehow foreign or un-American. The deap seated fear and visceral antipathy D'Souza and like minded Obama critics feel for Obama is also revealed by D'Souza's comments that if you care about America's prosperity and security, you should be "very afraid" of Barack Obama, that "his warped ideology really scares me," and "his vision for America is "ridiculous," and "actually an American nightmare." D'Souza writes that Obama took "the anti-colonial ideology of his African father" to heart from a very young age and throughout his formative years," Obama learning to see America as an instrument of neocolonialism. According to D'Souza, Obama's "script for America and the world ...was dreamt up not by Obama but by Obama's father," and  "the most powerful country in the world is being governed according to the dreams of a Luo tribesman of the 1950s-- a polygamist who abandoned his wives, drank himself into stupors, ..., raging againt the world for denying him the realization of his anti-colonial dreams." That D'Souza despises and loathes the father more than the son comes through in this and other similar observations: a "philandering, inebriated African socialist is now setting the nation's agenda through the reincarnation of his dreams in his son." The book's bottom line is that Obama wants America to fail, and he learned this from his America hating, anti colonialist father: "America today is being governed by a ghost." The problem with this idea, of course, is that Obama scarcely knew his father, who abandoned him and his mother before Obama even learned to talk, and who thereafter saw his son only once, for about a month when Obama was ten years old. As every serious Obama biographer knows, the real formative figures in Obama's early life were his mother and grandmother. But of course, they are white and were born in America, not Africa, so acknowledging their influence would hardly be useful in explaining why Obama grew up to be a scary black man who hates America and is working hard to destroy it. The Roots of Obama's Rage is a provocative piece of political rhetoric, not especially well written or well reasoned, but Important on its own way. D'Souza writes that Obama must be a one term President, and that "we also have to get rid of his team of sycophants and enablers... Harry Reid, Chris Dodd. Nancy Pelosi, Barney Frank, the entire liberal democratic menagerie." This book is about nothing so much as the right's implacable hatred of the left in general and of this President in particular. Reading this book will comfort those who despise Obama and view him as "other,"and explain the depth of their unreasoning hatred to those who don't.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    D'Souza offers an interesting perspective on our puzzling president. It's hard to argue with many of his conclusions. I give this book 4 stars instead of 5 because D'Souza doesn't deal at all with unions, which seem to be an important key to understanding Obama's philosophy. Also, much less importantly for the purposes of the book, there is no mention of Michelle and anything about their relationship that might further D'Souza's argument. The test of D'Souza's theory, that Obama is driven by D'Souza offers an interesting perspective on our puzzling president. It's hard to argue with many of his conclusions. I give this book 4 stars instead of 5 because D'Souza doesn't deal at all with unions, which seem to be an important key to understanding Obama's philosophy. Also, much less importantly for the purposes of the book, there is no mention of Michelle and anything about their relationship that might further D'Souza's argument. The test of D'Souza's theory, that Obama is driven by Afro-centric anti-colonialism, will be in its ability to predict Obama's reaction to future events. D'Souza mentions a few somewhat minor events that occurred as the book was being completed. And D'Souza makes some predictions regarding the direction of our policy vis-a-vis Afghanistan. Now that we are a few months after the book was completed, I was looking for other opportunities to test D'Souza's theory. Perhaps one is the coming issue of taxes. Will Obama acquiesce to an across-the-board extension of the current tax rates, or will he have a showdown with the GOP? I think the theory predicts that a showdown is likely.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Do you think Obama is a socialist? Do you think he's an Islamic sympathizer? Does that scare you? This book shows that his plans for America are far worse than just socialism. It reveals how much of his father's hatred of colonialism has colored his doctrine. Yes, the same father who abandoned Barack, Jr. entirely, had multiple wives, lost his legs in a drunk driving accident that killed another man, and ended up dying in another drunk driving accident. Like many children abandoned by their Do you think Obama is a socialist? Do you think he's an Islamic sympathizer? Does that scare you? This book shows that his plans for America are far worse than just socialism. It reveals how much of his father's hatred of colonialism has colored his doctrine. Yes, the same father who abandoned Barack, Jr. entirely, had multiple wives, lost his legs in a drunk driving accident that killed another man, and ended up dying in another drunk driving accident. Like many children abandoned by their fathers, Obama seems to be seeking his father's approval, by adopting Barack, Sr.'s ideas as his own. But those ideas didn't work for Kenya and they certainly aren't applicable to America, at least the America most of us want to be a part of. Everyone should read this book, whether you like or dislike Obama. Be afraid, be very afraid.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie

    Once again Dinesh D'Souza shows such insight into the subject matter he is addressing. Like Obama or not, there is no disputing the facts presented in this book. Yes, there his opinions are also expressed, but the documented facts are not refutable. I appreciate the deeper insight this has given me into the reasons for some of our current President's actions that have sometimes left me perplexed (i.e. NASA's new role, excessive spending, voting against NAFTA, etc.) At least now I know what his Once again Dinesh D'Souza shows such insight into the subject matter he is addressing. Like Obama or not, there is no disputing the facts presented in this book. Yes, there his opinions are also expressed, but the documented facts are not refutable. I appreciate the deeper insight this has given me into the reasons for some of our current President's actions that have sometimes left me perplexed (i.e. NASA's new role, excessive spending, voting against NAFTA, etc.) At least now I know what his motives seem to be. I find it a little unnerving to have an anti-colonialist as President of the USA... I especially enjoyed D'Souza's remarks in his final chapter expressing the reasons why colonialism is not a bad thing.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mark Peacock

    This book does a detailed analysis of facts and draws conclusions. As with any opinion book, this is the authors representation. I think you'd be hard pressed to find any action Pres. Obama has taken that can not be described by the overall thesis of this book. Obama doesn't hate America nor is he a socialist, or marxists. The author believes that Obama thinks that American colonialism is the root of all that is wrong in the world and as a result the US should pay for the ills caused by it's This book does a detailed analysis of facts and draws conclusions. As with any opinion book, this is the authors representation. I think you'd be hard pressed to find any action Pres. Obama has taken that can not be described by the overall thesis of this book. Obama doesn't hate America nor is he a socialist, or marxists. The author believes that Obama thinks that American colonialism is the root of all that is wrong in the world and as a result the US should pay for the ills caused by it's colonialization. Fasinating book written by an Obama class mate from college. A must read for all of Congress.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Norbert

    As one who was born in India the author is more objective as he doesn't have the mind set of one who was born and raised under the American culture. You will totally change your mind about Obama and will probably hate him more as he is trying to turn America into a Kenya. Obama is trying to make up for his father's shortcomings. The irony is that his father abandoned him when he was two years old and then only saw him once when he was 10. Basically Obama is chasing a ghost that he never really As one who was born in India the author is more objective as he doesn't have the mind set of one who was born and raised under the American culture. You will totally change your mind about Obama and will probably hate him more as he is trying to turn America into a Kenya. Obama is trying to make up for his father's shortcomings. The irony is that his father abandoned him when he was two years old and then only saw him once when he was 10. Basically Obama is chasing a ghost that he never really knew. He only knows what his mother told him as a child which were mostly lies. He feels he must do what his father couldn't.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Danna

    I once read a definition of brilliance as being able to express complexities in a simplified way. I would say that D'Souza qualifies for brilliant by that definition. He has created a construct - anti-colonialist - to explain Pres. Obama's personal choices, writings, speeches, and governance and presented it in a glib, easy-to grasp style. If he's correct we are in for many more shake-up-the-citizenry- type changes in our society and government if Obama is re-elected. If he's wrong ... Could I once read a definition of brilliance as being able to express complexities in a simplified way. I would say that D'Souza qualifies for brilliant by that definition. He has created a construct - anti-colonialist - to explain Pres. Obama's personal choices, writings, speeches, and governance and presented it in a glib, easy-to grasp style. If he's correct we are in for many more shake-up-the-citizenry- type changes in our society and government if Obama is re-elected. If he's wrong ... Could this construct be too simplified and Obama too-easily stuffed into it? Maybe D'Souza is simply partly brilliant and partly partisan. And why can't I get a good cover for this book?

  25. 4 out of 5

    Virginia Dyer

    I read this book in less than two days. It was fascinating, informative, well-written, and, at the same time, frightening in many ways. Through systematic, thorough, and documented research, Mr. D'Souza explains the influences on Barack Obama's life that has led him to where he is today. Many of the quotes and ideas were taken from Obama's own writings and speeches. Each quote thoroughly and completely documented. It should be read by everyone, especially now, before the November election. I read this book in less than two days. It was fascinating, informative, well-written, and, at the same time, frightening in many ways. Through systematic, thorough, and documented research, Mr. D'Souza explains the influences on Barack Obama's life that has led him to where he is today. Many of the quotes and ideas were taken from Obama's own writings and speeches. Each quote thoroughly and completely documented. It should be read by everyone, especially now, before the November election. Liberal, Conservative, or Independent should know for whom and for what they are voting before stepping into that voting booth.

  26. 4 out of 5

    John

    In this cool-headed, engrossing, and well thought-out book, D'Souza posits a theory which provides a consistent rationale behind Obama's more baffling actions as president. Some people will find it convincing, others won't. Personally, I think D'Souza makes a very strong case, though I suspect he may carry things a bit too far at times. Anyhow, reading THE ROOTS OF OBAMA'S RAGE made me feel like I "get" Obama for the very first time. And understanding where he is coming from actually makes me In this cool-headed, engrossing, and well thought-out book, D'Souza posits a theory which provides a consistent rationale behind Obama's more baffling actions as president. Some people will find it convincing, others won't. Personally, I think D'Souza makes a very strong case, though I suspect he may carry things a bit too far at times. Anyhow, reading THE ROOTS OF OBAMA'S RAGE made me feel like I "get" Obama for the very first time. And understanding where he is coming from actually makes me like him better, whether or not that's the author's intent.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Shirleen

    Dinesh, after much Obama research, lays out his theory of why Obama makes the decisions he does, then backs it up with facts from his research. He then goes on to make predictions of what he thinks Obama will do in the future, based on his theory. It'll be interesting to see if his predictions are fulfilled. This is an easy and interesting read. If Dinesh's theory is correct, this is a scary time for this country. Put simplistically, Dinesh's theory is that Obama has a hatred for colonialism.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Todd

    Reading was based on a recommendation and I was skeptical, based on the title, that this would be another "blast" Obama book from a far right reader. While D'Souza does take his shots at the President, his research and comments make sense and do not seem far off. When you look at Obama's speeches, writings and life growing up, you can easily understand why D'Souza states that all decisions and reactions can be answered by his premise. With almost 250 references to books, speeches and articles, the Reading was based on a recommendation and I was skeptical, based on the title, that this would be another "blast" Obama book from a far right reader. While D'Souza does take his shots at the President, his research and comments make sense and do not seem far off. When you look at Obama's speeches, writings and life growing up, you can easily understand why D'Souza states that all decisions and reactions can be answered by his premise. With almost 250 references to books, speeches and articles, the author frames his argument with their own words and beliefs.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Beakerkin

    Easy on the reader professionally done. Can be finnished in one or two evenings. The author has written other books that are interesting. Those who are birthers or conspiracy loons will be disappointed in this book. In general, I strongly disagree with the authors conclusions. The feigning of another socialist strain is contrived nonsense. Bill Ayers types were actively working to aid the enemy durring the Cold War and anti colonial rhetoric was merely a means to an end. However, the book remains Easy on the reader professionally done. Can be finnished in one or two evenings. The author has written other books that are interesting. Those who are birthers or conspiracy loons will be disappointed in this book. In general, I strongly disagree with the authors conclusions. The feigning of another socialist strain is contrived nonsense. Bill Ayers types were actively working to aid the enemy durring the Cold War and anti colonial rhetoric was merely a means to an end. However, the book remains an informative and thought provoking book.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Meyer

    Really well done book that gets to the heart of what really motivates Obama. Argued that Obama is an anti-colonialist, everything that Obama has done begins to make much more sense. Following his life from early age to today and predictions for tomorrow, of which a couple already have come true, you are shown who influenced Obama through personal contact or their writings, much of which are taken from Obama's own writings and speeches. Truly an important work that should be read by anybody Really well done book that gets to the heart of what really motivates Obama. Argued that Obama is an anti-colonialist, everything that Obama has done begins to make much more sense. Following his life from early age to today and predictions for tomorrow, of which a couple already have come true, you are shown who influenced Obama through personal contact or their writings, much of which are taken from Obama's own writings and speeches. Truly an important work that should be read by anybody wanting to understand this man and his philosophy.

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