counter create hit The Ragamuffin Gospel (Authentic Classics) - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Ragamuffin Gospel (Authentic Classics)

Availability: Ready to download

Muchos de los creyentes creen en la gracia de Dios, pero solo en teoria, ya que de alguna manera no pueden aplicarla a la vida diaria. Ellos continuan viendo a Dios como alguien que toma en cuenta nuestras faltas y exitos, y son anotados en un libro para darnos una puntuacion. En el libro El evangelio de los andrajosos, Brennan Manning nos recuerda que esta manera de Muchos de los creyentes creen en la gracia de Dios, pero solo en teoria, ya que de alguna manera no pueden aplicarla a la vida diaria. Ellos continuan viendo a Dios como alguien que toma en cuenta nuestras faltas y exitos, y son anotados en un libro para darnos una puntuacion. En el libro El evangelio de los andrajosos, Brennan Manning nos recuerda que esta manera de pensar esta muy lejos de la verdad. Nosotros venimos a Dios mugrientos, sucios y abatidos, pero Dios nos hace sentar a sus pies, nos sonrie y nos hace entender que somos su especial tesoro y que su amor incondicional arde por nosotros constantemente. Al abrazar su gracia, entonces podemos disfrutar el verdadero gozo del evangelio, el cual toca a cualquier marginado.Este libro nos ensenara: Que Dios nos acepta tal y como somos y no por lo que hacemos.A entender el verdadero significado de la gracia de Dios y como aplicarla.El amor apasionado y obstinado que Dios tiene por nosotros.Puntos claves: Prologo por el conocido cantautor de musica cristiana contemporanea, Michael W. SmithContiene preguntas de estudio Contiene una guia para meditacion y oracionEpilogo por el autor, diez anos despuesEndosado por Max Lucado, Michael Card y Eugene PetersonExcelente herramienta que ayudara a entender la gracia de DiosQuienes compraran este libro?Hombres MujeresJovenesLideres ministerialesPastores


Compare
Ads Banner

Muchos de los creyentes creen en la gracia de Dios, pero solo en teoria, ya que de alguna manera no pueden aplicarla a la vida diaria. Ellos continuan viendo a Dios como alguien que toma en cuenta nuestras faltas y exitos, y son anotados en un libro para darnos una puntuacion. En el libro El evangelio de los andrajosos, Brennan Manning nos recuerda que esta manera de Muchos de los creyentes creen en la gracia de Dios, pero solo en teoria, ya que de alguna manera no pueden aplicarla a la vida diaria. Ellos continuan viendo a Dios como alguien que toma en cuenta nuestras faltas y exitos, y son anotados en un libro para darnos una puntuacion. En el libro El evangelio de los andrajosos, Brennan Manning nos recuerda que esta manera de pensar esta muy lejos de la verdad. Nosotros venimos a Dios mugrientos, sucios y abatidos, pero Dios nos hace sentar a sus pies, nos sonrie y nos hace entender que somos su especial tesoro y que su amor incondicional arde por nosotros constantemente. Al abrazar su gracia, entonces podemos disfrutar el verdadero gozo del evangelio, el cual toca a cualquier marginado.Este libro nos ensenara: Que Dios nos acepta tal y como somos y no por lo que hacemos.A entender el verdadero significado de la gracia de Dios y como aplicarla.El amor apasionado y obstinado que Dios tiene por nosotros.Puntos claves: Prologo por el conocido cantautor de musica cristiana contemporanea, Michael W. SmithContiene preguntas de estudio Contiene una guia para meditacion y oracionEpilogo por el autor, diez anos despuesEndosado por Max Lucado, Michael Card y Eugene PetersonExcelente herramienta que ayudara a entender la gracia de DiosQuienes compraran este libro?Hombres MujeresJovenesLideres ministerialesPastores

30 review for The Ragamuffin Gospel (Authentic Classics)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    The best way I can describe this book is to quote from it: --------------------------------------------------------------- "When I get honest, I admit I am a bundle of paradoxes. I believe and I doubt, I hope and get discouraged, I love and I hate, I feel bad about feeling good, I feel guilty about not feeling guilty. I am trusting and suspicious. I am honest and I still play games. Aristotle said I am a rational animal; I say I am an angel with an incredible capacity for beer. To live by grace The best way I can describe this book is to quote from it: --------------------------------------------------------------- "When I get honest, I admit I am a bundle of paradoxes. I believe and I doubt, I hope and get discouraged, I love and I hate, I feel bad about feeling good, I feel guilty about not feeling guilty. I am trusting and suspicious. I am honest and I still play games. Aristotle said I am a rational animal; I say I am an angel with an incredible capacity for beer. To live by grace means to acknowledge my whole life story, the light side and the dark. In admitting my shadow side, I learn who I am and what God's grace means." --------------------------------------------------------------- "The gentleness of Jesus with sinners flowed from his ability to read their hearts. Behind people's grumpiest poses and most puzzling defense mechanisms, behind their arrogance and airs, behind their silence, sneers and causes, Jesus saw little children who hadn't been loved enough and who had ceased growing because someone had ceased believing in them. His extraordinary sensitivity caused Jesus to speak of the faithful as children, no matter how tall, rich, clever and successful they might be." ----------------------------------------------------------- "Whatever our failings may be, we need not lower our eyes in the presence of Jesus . . . we need not hide all that is ugly and repulsive in us. Jesus comes not for the super-spiritual but for the wobbly and weak-kneed who know they don't have it all together, and who are not too proud to accept the handout of amazing grace . . . There they are. There we are – the multitude who so wanted to be faithful, who at times got defeated, soiled by life, and bested by trials, wearing the bloodied garments of life's tribulations, but through it all clung to the faith. My friends, if this is not good news to you, you have never understood the gospel of grace."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Doreen

    This book changed my life. Some people may have trouble getting through it because it really challenged a lot of things that you may have held onto tightly for so long. But even if you don't agree with everything (there are a few things here and there), there is a tremendous amount of wisdom that can be gleaned from the author's insight. Upon reading this wonderful book, my eyes were open to a whole new world that I wasn't even aware that they were previously closed to. It knocked me around This book changed my life. Some people may have trouble getting through it because it really challenged a lot of things that you may have held onto tightly for so long. But even if you don't agree with everything (there are a few things here and there), there is a tremendous amount of wisdom that can be gleaned from the author's insight. Upon reading this wonderful book, my eyes were open to a whole new world that I wasn't even aware that they were previously closed to. It knocked me around emotionally and spiritually in ways that I really needed. Now, I find myself less judgmental of others and more open to compassion to those that might be struggling with whatever trials they are facing. "We see a lot of people and we make assumptions. We listen as their actions and lives speak but do we truly hear and understand what they are going through? Am i really listening or am I just assuming I know and tell em to suck it up?" - Paul Wright This book teaches about grace. Most people think they know what that means, but it really doesn't show in their lives. I love this book and I hope every one, especially Christians, read it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    I went into this book (written in 1990) thinking, "Okay, author, what are you going to tell me that I haven't read in the authors pumping out books after you?" I had planned to zip through it as quick as possible to check it off the list and put it on the shelf. It didn't take too many pages for me to realize that this was not that kind of book. This is the kind of book you put on your "I need to reread this every few years so I don't forget how important the message is" shelf. Brennan Manning's I went into this book (written in 1990) thinking, "Okay, author, what are you going to tell me that I haven't read in the authors pumping out books after you?" I had planned to zip through it as quick as possible to check it off the list and put it on the shelf. It didn't take too many pages for me to realize that this was not that kind of book. This is the kind of book you put on your "I need to reread this every few years so I don't forget how important the message is" shelf. Brennan Manning's message could be summed up in three words: God is gracious. But don't let that sound cliche. The book teaches that we do not need to think about God as judge, God as condemner, God as needing to be appeased. God is happy just to have our company. God expects us to mess up more than we think we will. That's okay. God loves us anyway. And God knows that love is better motivation than fear anyway. And stop trying to be so self-righteous, because that only takes away from your trust in God. You're just a ragamuffin. Admit it and move on. The story that will stick with me is the author's commentary on the parable of the prodigal son. The father, waiting for the wayward son to return, does not wait for the son to apologize and say he'll never mess up again before he is smothering him with kisses. All the son needs to do is show up. No eye contact, no speech, just two feet on the road home.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    If you are interested in the Christian faith but find it self-righteous and restricting, this book might be a refreshing change of pace. This writer definitely refrains from judgement, and makes the case for self-acceptance of your own frailty and affirms that God eagerly takes on "special cases", and he proves we all somehow fall in that category. It is a humble book that gently puts it arms around those who have failed miserably in their faith and yet still want to try to find their way toward If you are interested in the Christian faith but find it self-righteous and restricting, this book might be a refreshing change of pace. This writer definitely refrains from judgement, and makes the case for self-acceptance of your own frailty and affirms that God eagerly takes on "special cases", and he proves we all somehow fall in that category. It is a humble book that gently puts it arms around those who have failed miserably in their faith and yet still want to try to find their way toward their Truth.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dixie

    I am a bedraggled, beaten up, messy ragamuffin. I am a former ministry junkie with a bad habit of seeking to please almost everyone and desperately trying to hide my sins from those who expect me to be clean and white-washed as they are. I have fallen and fallen again. Mostly I failed myself. Thank God. It was time for that old life to disappear! And it was time for me to read this lovely book. I stopped many times to wipe my eyes, to pray for forgiveness and acceptance of mercy and grace and to I am a bedraggled, beaten up, messy ragamuffin. I am a former ministry junkie with a bad habit of seeking to please almost everyone and desperately trying to hide my sins from those who expect me to be clean and white-washed as they are. I have fallen and fallen again. Mostly I failed myself. Thank God. It was time for that old life to disappear! And it was time for me to read this lovely book. I stopped many times to wipe my eyes, to pray for forgiveness and acceptance of mercy and grace and to open my heart to more. It was time to fully accept my ragamuffinness and let God love me anyway. Though I have known this to be true, I had forgotten that the gospel was for me even after salvation was assured. Through the book, the picture of the Prodigal Son story spoke to me again in a new way. I am currently estranged from my children because of my ragamuffinness. They are refusing to associate with me until I "stop sinning." But my eyes are on the streets as I drive along, my eyes never stop roaming the crowds in stores in hopes of seeing one of them. I want them to drive up and come home to me. But I came to realize in reading this book that I was hoping to "clear the air" when and if they do show up. Now I know that my only response will be gratitude, openness and kisses of kindness and thankfulness. I have no right to ask for more from them or from Abba. I will say, "All is forgotten. Come into the house." This book will be a gift I give to those I love and those who need my love. I'll likely buy a dozen copies just to keep on hand for anyone who seems to need a cool drink of living water from the Master Himself. he says come, all you who are burdened and ladened heavy with life. I will come back to The Ragamuffin Gospel again and again when I need that living water to wash over me. I am grateful to Brennan Manning for penning this book. The Spirit still moves in illuminating the purity of God's grace. May it always be.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    Such a good book! I really cannot believe it’s taken me this long to get around to it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Barnabas Piper

    Well, all the recommendations I received for this over the years were correct with a bullet. What a magnificent book. Some books teach. Some books inspire. Some books reveal. This did all that, but what it really did was help me love Jesus more and know the love of Jesus more. I loved Manning's bluntness and ability to incisively get to the heart of grace and God's love.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Devin

    I was first introduced to Brennan Manning when I read his Above All: He Took the Fall and Thought of Me which is basically an exposition on Michael W. Smith's song "Above All." In that book, I saw some serious problems in his thought, but people assured me that I was simply misunderstanding what he had to say and that Brennan Manning really is a good guy who is faithful to what the Bible teaches. I was told that reading The Ragamuffin Gospel would accurately represent Manning's teaching. If I was first introduced to Brennan Manning when I read his Above All: He Took the Fall and Thought of Me which is basically an exposition on Michael W. Smith's song "Above All." In that book, I saw some serious problems in his thought, but people assured me that I was simply misunderstanding what he had to say and that Brennan Manning really is a good guy who is faithful to what the Bible teaches. I was told that reading The Ragamuffin Gospel would accurately represent Manning's teaching. If this accurately represents Manning's teaching, he has bigger problems than just some faulty theology. Being a college student pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree in Biblical and Theological studies, I wanted to critically examine this book and weigh everything Manning had to say against the biblical teachings, theology, and doctrine which I have come to find so precious to the Christian life. I was a bit put off when Manning said on page 17, "It [this book:] is not for the academics who would imprison Jesus in the ivory tower of exegesis." Unfortunately, many people would applaud Manning for "sticking it to the man" in saying this. Even more unfortunately, I agree that many divinity schools today put much emphasis on doctrine and theology but not on piety. This statement is only the first showing of his antiestablishment attitude. Indeed, Manning does not like the "institutional church." He consistently compares learned church leaders to the Pharisees in Jesus' day. By the end of the book, Manning had told me that God's enemies are not the sexually immoral, idolaters, adulterers, homosexuals, thieves, the greedy, drunkards, revilers, or swindlers of 1 Corinthians 6:9-11, but Manning informed me that the biggest detriment to the church was anyone with a seminary degree who would dare say that there is any sort of life-change required in entering the kingdom of God. This plays into the doctrine of salvation he presented. Manning does well to say that everyone is a sinner. Everyone is with sin and not a good person. He also does well to inform his readers that sin is people's main problem which prevents God from loving them. He does not do well to answer the question, "What is God's solution to this problem of sin?" According to Manning, God simply overlooks or ignores men's sin and accepts them for who they are. At one point, Manning goes so far to admit that this doesn't seem just according to man's idea of justice and claims that this "irrationality" is what makes God so glorious. This immediately disregards the 500-year-old doctrine of Penal Substitutionary Atonement which says that Jesus' death quantifiably paid for the sin of everyone who would be saved and holds that God's justice is satisfied because his wrath is poured out and that his mercy is displayed in pouring his wrath out on himself in the Son. The sacred-secular split is another thing which Manning is clear to address. Toward the beginning, Manning speaks against it, saying that it doesn't exist. Later on, he admits that he thinks the gospel is irrational, a thought which he makes clear on page 207, saying, "My only prayer: May Jesus Christ convert us to the folly of the gospel." In book:Escape from Reason: A Penetrating Analysis of Trends in Modern Thoughts|148109] by Francis Schaeffer, the long trail of the sacred-secular split is traced from its very onset. In his book, Schaeffer writes of Soren Kierkegaard who said that the gospel required "a leap of faith" and that the Christian belief is not something that should be considered rational. Well, the irrationality of Christianity would then have no place affecting the rationality of math, science, politics, and literature, and so an irrational-rational split was created which lead to today's sacred-secular split. Manning's type of thinking is exactly what leads to the split which Manning dislikes so much. In this book, Manning displays his lack of understanding much of church history. I was first alerted to this when he used the term "puritanical" in a negative light. Reading books and sermons by various puritans, anyone can see that these people had profound understanding of Scripture and of the Christian life, but Manning's understanding of them seems to be shaped more by The Scarlet Letter than anything they themselves wrote. Indeed, the sons and grandsons of Puritans were the ones who fought in The Revolutionary War and went on to for The United States of America. He also displays his lack of historical learning when he praises Thomas More for his moral fortitude when he faced his execution at the order of King Henry VIII. What Manning doesn't seem to grasp is that More was executed for his undying loyalty to the Roman Catholic Church (which at that time, the time of the Reformation, was quite corrupt) which Manning thoroughly decries elsewhere in his book. Finally, Manning is a heretic, and he knows it. Manning consistently lists "condemning the heresy of universalism" among negative responses to his message. When relating the Parable of the Good Samaritan, Manning says that the Samaritan is a "heretic." He doesn't go on to mention the cultural, historical, and theological differences between Samaritans and Jews which would have earned such a title for the Samaritan, but Manning moves on to his next point, leaving the reader thinking that heretics are just people with different opinions about scripture who the church refuses to help. If there was any doubt that Manning isn't making an attack on established ecclesiastical institutions, Manning addresses the negative responses to his book in the appendix entry "The Scandal of Grace: Fifteen Years Later." He doesn't say that such an overwhelmingly negative response from learned churchgoers and seminarians is an evidence that, in fact, might be wrong on some points, but he says that it is evidence of just how hard it is for stuck-up, whitewashed, pharisaical Christians to accept his version of the gospel of grace. Underlying this entire book is a prideful attitude that anyone who objects to his message is wrong and that he is right. He claims toward the beginning of the book that he reads Scripture without any preconceived notions affecting his interpretation, but, if I haven't made this clear above, Manning has many preconceived notions; indeed, everyone does. This book sits next to The Shack in that it has some very heart-warming stories of men confronting sin and understanding the love of God, but the theological sacrifices one has to make to appreciate the entirety of this book are not worth the read. For a more organized and articulate critique of this book by someone else, click here.

  9. 4 out of 5

    J.S. Park

    Here's a test for you: While reading this book, were you stirred with compassion or contempt? It will speak volumes about how much you get God's grace. While not agreeable on every point, Brennan Manning has written one of the most down-to-earth classics of Christian literature. There is a lot to love here amidst some of the shaky theology, and though critics jump in through those cracks with plenty of complaints, there is no denying the wonderful power of the cross in Manning's work. He has Here's a test for you: While reading this book, were you stirred with compassion or contempt? It will speak volumes about how much you get God's grace. While not agreeable on every point, Brennan Manning has written one of the most down-to-earth classics of Christian literature. There is a lot to love here amidst some of the shaky theology, and though critics jump in through those cracks with plenty of complaints, there is no denying the wonderful power of the cross in Manning's work. He has drawn a picture of grace bigger and better than any modern Christian author has even remotely attempted. Let's get this out of the way: Brennan Manning talks about sin. He does not ignore it. Any critic who says so is selectively reading. His story of Max the lying drunk is horrific; it is exactly what sin does to an unrepentant fool. Manning's work is also largely reactionary to the stifling legalism of modern churches. Of course he overwhelms with grace. So did Jesus. If so much grace bothers you, it's possible the book is aiming right at your uptight moralism, just as it did mine. I was thoroughly challenged on much I had believed about God's love. I always knew the immensity of God's wrath. The Asian community emphasizes more fear and respect for authority than almost any other culture in the world. It has shaped the Asian-Christian church to near-unbearable imprisonment. The book was literally a breath of fresh air for me. Manning makes a razor sharp focus on God's grace because he assumes you have been exhausted by legalities. Of course this can backfire; it will make you uncomfortable if you violently uphold sound doctrine, or if you don't have a healthy fear of God. If you're expecting a balanced work, go pick up a brick of systematic theology. This work makes ONE case. I hope that's okay for some of you doctrine-loving seminarians (I am one). Manning is talking to real live people with real problems who do not need one more exegesis on all the Greek permutations of an aorist verb. He speaks to broken people drowning in their sinful filth. Like the kind of people Jesus ate with. I loved how Manning spoke to people with real struggles. Doctrine should never be cold and calculating. Please gut check yourself on that, as I did while reading. There is much to disagree with as well. Concepts of self-love and inner-child and unqualified tolerance are a bit trite and even counterproductive to his writing. He plain stumbles through some of these ideas. But to write him off simply because you find that "detestable" is a little strange. Even arrogant. When we hear of God's grace, do you feel compassion or contempt? The Ragamuffin Gospel will draw you to one or the other. I can almost guarantee that if you feel contempt, you might be the same way with others, or you will defend yourself about it. In other words, Manning may have achieved his goal: to bring you out of your safe church brain and into the heart of Jesus. As he calls it, the Second Journey. We'd be wise not to shut that down so fast.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Maggie

    I have a confession to make. Sometimes when I sing songs of worship in church, I wonder why we do this. Is it necessary to tell God over and over how great He is? Isn't it better to go straight to the sermon and learn how to obey God and lead Godly lives? Now I know why we sing. We sing because God is not just floating above us, He is in us and it is by his grace that we can sing. We sing because there is no point learning how to do good works when it is grace, not works, that saves us. This book I have a confession to make. Sometimes when I sing songs of worship in church, I wonder why we do this. Is it necessary to tell God over and over how great He is? Isn't it better to go straight to the sermon and learn how to obey God and lead Godly lives? Now I know why we sing. We sing because God is not just floating above us, He is in us and it is by his grace that we can sing. We sing because there is no point learning how to do good works when it is grace, not works, that saves us. This book is about the gospel of grace. It tells the message of what Jesus Christ is all about. God knows all my sins, but instead of being a petty bookkeeper counting them one by one, He forgives me. In fact He forgives me even before I repent, so if I hope to gain forgiveness by repenting, I am being a fool. Instead, real repentance is an act of gratitude, to thank God for accepting me with all my flaws, failures and weaknesses. By grace I can accept myself because God accepted me first. Hence there is no reason to deny any of my sins, and every reason to honestly admit them so I gain a better idea of how much God has forgiven me for. Because it is grace and not works that saves us, I am no better than the worst sinner. Who am I to judge the smokers and the drug addicts when Jesus accepts them to His table? The gospel of grace calls us to forgive and not to judge, for I cannot reject the one that Jesus has accepted. Jesus' words are not to be used against others, but to be taken personally. There is no reason for me to be jealous about those who lead sinful lives yet receive salvation on their deathbeds, for I am no better than them in Jesus' eyes. At the same time, I am not inferior to those who are more holy or more pious than me, for all our works are insignificant compared to God's grace. To respond to grace, we have to first appreciate it. Grace is everywhere – in nature, movies and people – and it is time for me to stop taking things for granted and to instead open my eyes to wonder at God's grace in commonplace events. Everything is a gift from God. Because I am so unknowledgeable and insignificant, I have no right to impose myself on others. Instead I should learn from others and hear what God has the grace to teach me through them. Look at the world with an open mind and remember that God, no man's law, is first. Next, we have to be honest with ourselves. I have always struggled with the commandment of not worshipping false idols, because I know that there are many things that I place above God, like food, work or books. Rather than face my guilt, it is so much easier to pretend that I make none of these my idols. But Manning says, "When we give anything more priority than we give to God, we commit idolatry. Thus we all commit idolatry countless times each day." In essence, he knows that he sins, but instead of guiltily avoiding it, he accepts it. Accepting our weaknesses and our inability to overcome these weaknesses makes us dependent on grace to deliver us out of them. Then we have to trust. We have to trust that the Lord is all-loving and all-forgiving and that he accepts our failures. We reject grace and stop trusting in God when we are unable to let our guilt go. When we are too tired to say anything more than a short, shallow prayer, we have to trust that God accepts, forgives, and is delighted that we even tried. Real trust is not dependent on a response from God. I recently struggled because God didn't seem to be speaking to me, but now I see that this is perhaps a test from God – will I still trust when I can't hear Him? I thought I was doing something wrong, but now I realise God just wants me to wait patiently and He will, by grace, speak to me one day. Trusting God does not mean trusting that He will give us lives free from suffering, but that He will enable us to triumph over suffering. It does not mean that we will stop sinning, but that all things, even sin, will be used for God's good plan. Finally, we have to love God. We will never be able to love Him as much as He loves us, but He understands. All He asks is that in our own puny ways, we try to love Him in gratitude to Him loving me first. We show gratitude by reading the Bible to understand Him better, and by being generous and compassionate to others, for Jesus says that what we do for the least of His brothers we do for Him. Grace gives us freedom from the fear of not impressing anyone, even ourselves. Knowing that God accepts me in spite of everything, I am free to be who I am. Because I am nothing compared to Jesus, I can worship freely as well because I have nothing to lose. I have been wondering about the narrow gate of heaven and the wide gate of hell, and how this can be reconciled with the grace that is extended to all. I think that perhaps though grace has been extended, I still need to accept it. When I remain guilty and refuse to accept God's forgiveness, when I judge others, or when I read the Bible and pray to make God like me more, I reject grace. When I hold people to the conventional methods of worship at my church, I reject the grace that accepts the people behind all forms of worship. When I think that my faith is solid and that I am spiritually mature, my acceptance of God's grace which transcends all understanding dies. It is so easy to reject grace, that is why the gate is narrow. It is like God says "Here is eternal life" and I say "I don't want it". It is so easy to sin. While I was reading this book, I felt so overwhelmed with God's forgiveness that I couldn't help passing on this forgiveness to everyone around me. When a political leader made a misguided comment, I forgave him amidst the flurry of criticism around me. Then I thought, why can't everyone be as forgiving as me? Why are they so sinful? That's when I realised my forgiveness had turned into condescension. I started out forgiving in gratitude to God, but ended up forgiving because God says that is how we show gratitude. I had turned from living by grace to living by works. In trying to accept God's grace, I rejected it. But that is where grace comes in. No matter how much we try to sin, we always end up sinning. Our self-centred human nature compels us to sin. But God understands. He tells us, "Repent, trust in me, and I will teach you to accept my grace." In future days, I will turn away from God again and again. I will reach spiritual low points when my heart feels apathetic, my life feels empty and God's voice seems absent. But each time, God's grace will carry me back. I went into this book feeling uncomfortable. I felt like one of the complacently successful people that, as Manning warns in the preface, the book is not meant for. I certainly did not feel bedraggled, beat-up or burnt-out. But as I read, I realised how truly poor in spirit I am, to the extent that I don't even know it. It amazes me that as a Christian from birth I have never understood the central message of God's grace before, and I thank God for showing me - through grace, of course - this book. I pray that He will continue to humble me so that I can truly appreciate the goodness of His grace.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    This book did not pass my 100-page test. I desperately wanted to love it, and it started out seeming so promising. I was worried about the gimmicky 19-step program addendum tacked onto the end, true. And I was worried when I looked on Amazon and saw that the author seems to have made something of a cottage industry of spin-off volumes and workbooks and so forth. The profile of the author, too, seemed a little cheesy and weirdly evasive. Still I tried to put all of that aside and keep an open This book did not pass my 100-page test. I desperately wanted to love it, and it started out seeming so promising. I was worried about the gimmicky 19-step program addendum tacked onto the end, true. And I was worried when I looked on Amazon and saw that the author seems to have made something of a cottage industry of spin-off volumes and workbooks and so forth. The profile of the author, too, seemed a little cheesy and weirdly evasive. Still I tried to put all of that aside and keep an open mind, as I'm always eager to hear about grace, and that seemed to be what this was about. Well alas, everything good he had to say about the topic seemed to be said in the first 25 pages, and then periodically reiterated. And aside from that, everything there is to say of this nature about grace has already been said better and more eloquently and with more humbleness by Martin Luther or one of his disciples. Manning, on the other hand, set to work right away on alienating me and creeping me out. I was already starting to get a nasty "Oprah Book Club" vibe off of him, and then on page 48 (in my edition) he dropped in a massive, massive overshare that may have made me throw up in my mouth just a little. I've read far more disgusting things in books (not to mention online) but the random way he just tossed this anecdote in there creeped me out. I felt, honestly, a bit violated to have this "TMI" thrown at me out of nowhere, for no particular reason other than shock effect. At that point, I began skimming, then speed-skimming, to see if it was going to get any better, any less gimmicky or more deep and interesting. It didn't. At some point I caught him using the term "inner child" and the book was officially dead to me. Mannning is definitely of the "Jesus was a closet socialist/Jesus was a hippie misfit" school of thought. He beats you over the head over and over again that Jesus likes dropouts (like himself, an ex-Franciscan) and addicts (like himself, a recovering alcoholic) and prostitutes, and lepers. All of this is neatly decontextualized of the actual Gospel context, so unless you know a decent amount about the New Testament you are helpless to refute his various assertations and are likely to just go with them, even when he is seriously erroneous. Manning seems to really have it in for educated people, theologians, people who aren't poor, and especially for the archetypical "upstanding matronly woman." As an educated and decidedly matronly woman I got the impression that he felt Jesus' love and acceptance extended to me, but only grudgingly. Twould be better were I a reformed hooker or some other kind of "leper." As they say, when you have re-created God in your own image...you have committed blasphemy. Dude even shares an anecdote meant to demonstrate we are to "loosen up." Yes, he told me to "loosen up." This is so junior high school, where being the smart, good kid is "bad" and being the smartaleck, underachiever is "good." I expect more from my Christianity than this upside-down world contrarianism, thank you very much.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brian Eshleman

    I'm going soft in my reviews. This is my second five-star review in a row. But I think I stored more in my quote bank than I left behind and have got to find room for Brendan Manning at the table of people I want to have dinner with. That's an accomplishment for 240 pages. He would probably like that I made some new friends on Goodreads over statuses from his book that I was eager to share.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jenn Raley

    I have no quarrel with the message of this book. For Christians who are weary of feeling judged and striving to be perfect, Manning's message that God loves us all, no matter what, is an important message. I just wasn't very impressed with the writing. It was apparent to me that Manning is a really good speaker, and that most likely this book is a conglomeration of stories he would tell as he traveled around to various speaking engagements. However, the way the personal stories and anecdotes were I have no quarrel with the message of this book. For Christians who are weary of feeling judged and striving to be perfect, Manning's message that God loves us all, no matter what, is an important message. I just wasn't very impressed with the writing. It was apparent to me that Manning is a really good speaker, and that most likely this book is a conglomeration of stories he would tell as he traveled around to various speaking engagements. However, the way the personal stories and anecdotes were woven together with observations and exhortations was slightly inartful. Particularly kludgy was the way Manning referenced passages and quotes from other authors - sometimes they were credited within the text and sometimes not; sometimes the may have been genuine, and sometimes probably not. (There was one Thomas Merton quote that could not be found via Google except for the version from this book!) This is a good book if you need a spiritual pick-me-up, but not if you're looking for deep thinking or strong writing.

  14. 5 out of 5

    booklady

    It’s been a long time since I’ve read a book about the Gospel which has encompassed so many different faith traditions drawing all the threads together in one beautiful creation. The Ragamuffin Gospel has given me a lot to think about and work on in my spiritual life. What I’m focusing on now is what Manning pointed out as, ‘the greatest sin: to do the right thing for the wrong reason.’* We are all sinners and ‘many of us even pretend to believe we are sinners. Consequently, all we can do is It’s been a long time since I’ve read a book about the Gospel which has encompassed so many different faith traditions drawing all the threads together in one beautiful creation. The Ragamuffin Gospel has given me a lot to think about and work on in my spiritual life. What I’m focusing on now is what Manning pointed out as, ‘the greatest sin: to do the right thing for the wrong reason.’* We are all sinners and ‘many of us even pretend to believe we are sinners. Consequently, all we can do is pretend to believe we have been forgiven. As a result, our whole spiritual life is pseudo-repentance and pseudo-bliss.’ Brennan Manning, the author of The Ragamuffin Gospel was an ordained Catholic priest for many years. Although I do not know what happened in his spiritual journey, at some point along the way he broke with the Catholic Church. And yet his writing remains very catholic, i.e., universal. He quotes the saints as well as renowned Christians of all denominations. It is so unfortunate there is currently this divide between Catholics and Protestants in terms of reading one another’s writings. So much could be learned from each other within a spirit of mutual support and exchange and this could lead to even greater brotherly love for the People of God. The troubles Manning describes with institutional religion cross denominational lines. In that sense he is meeting a genuine need through his books. He reaches out to those who still want to believe but have not encountered Christ when they came to a Christian church. Manning's pastoral approach to the Gospel is beautiful but he doesn't give any practical ideas for the organization. His focus is one-on-one: active-listening, total forgiveness, real presence ... being Jesus to and seeing Jesus in the other. Mostly we-I-want models for parishes or quick fixes and he is telling us that what we are searching for is a ‘Who’ and He is Christ. Probably I am oversimplifying his message, but this was the central point to which he seemed to keep returning. As I said in the beginning, he has given me a lot to ponder and to take to prayer. And of course there's that ‘doing the right thing for the right reason’... I suppose I could spend rest of my life working on my motives... Some other quotes I liked: ‘In conversation, the disciple who is truly poor in spirit always leaves the other person feeling, My life has been enriched by talking with you. This is neither false modesty nor phony humility.’ (p. 81). ‘When we give anything more priority than we give to God, we commit idolatry. Thus we all commit idolatry countless times every day. Once we accept the gospel of grace and seek to shed defense mechanisms and subterfuges, honesty becomes both more difficult and more important. Honesty involves the willingness to face the truth of who we are, regardless of how threatening or unpleasant our perceptions may be.’ (pp. 85-86) ‘When a man or woman is truly honest (not just working at it) it is virtually impossible to insult them personally.’ (p. 86) ‘The way we see other people is usually the way we see ourselves. If we have made peace with our flawed humanity and embraced our ragamuffin identity, we are able to tolerate in others what was previously unacceptable in ourselves.’ (p. 157) “Be still and acknowledge that I am God” (Psalm 46:10) is not merely a pious suggestion, but a divine injunction. FOR RAGAMUFFINS, God’s name is Mercy. We see our darkness as a prized possession because it drives us into the heart of God. Without mercy our darkness would plunge us into despair—and for some, self-destruction. Time alone with God reveals the unfathomable depths of the poverty of our spirit. We are so poor that even our poverty is not our own: It belongs to the mysterium tremendum of a loving God. (pp. 220-221). * Manning attributes this quote to T.S. Elliott

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

    Honestly, I teeter-tottered on this book. Some parts stirred my soul even to tears with the truth of the Gospel. Others furrowed my brow, leaving question marks in the margins. Sometimes this was all within the span of a single page. Upon reflection, I've come to this conclusion: FOR BELIEVERS (for sons and daughters of God), the essence of this book should strike a beautiful chord in our hearts and minds. I like Manning's words: "He is the only God man has ever heard of who loves sinners... Through Honestly, I teeter-tottered on this book. Some parts stirred my soul even to tears with the truth of the Gospel. Others furrowed my brow, leaving question marks in the margins. Sometimes this was all within the span of a single page. Upon reflection, I've come to this conclusion: FOR BELIEVERS (for sons and daughters of God), the essence of this book should strike a beautiful chord in our hearts and minds. I like Manning's words: "He is the only God man has ever heard of who loves sinners... Through no merit of ours, but by his mercy we have been restored to a right relationship with God through the life, death, and resurrection of His beloved Son." Wow. Beautiful chord. That said, I have discovered the source of my uneasiness: context. Manning shares a part of his background in chapter two: "Growing up Catholic in the late 1930s and 1940s and 1950s, my central preoccupation was sin. Sin was everywhere. It consumed us and dominated our consciousness." Inside Manning's context, a commentary on grace is a necessity. But as a recent college graduate living in a culture already inundated with a secular form of grace and love (and practically no concept of sin), words on grace seem to further the lopsidedness here. We are sinful beyond belief; the Lord is gracious beyond belief. We must hold both of those truths in our minds at once. Stylistically, Manning's work reads easily but sometimes rabbit trails a point or leaves dangling stories. I wonder if Manning wouldn't chuckle and agree. "In these pages," he writes, "I have stuttered and stammered in a halting attempt to hint at the shattering reality of the furious love of God." Mission accomplished, Mr. Manning. Thank you for a book well worth reading.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    It is Good News for the Bedraggled, Beat-Up and Burnt Out. And, I don't care what anyone says, ALL OF US are ONE of those at one point or another in our lives. If you are shaking your head "not me" then please read this book to have the rose washed off your frames. :) I was reading this book when I read The Shack and there are element and themes that are similar in both books, but this one is not listed as a work of fiction (be cause it is not).

  17. 4 out of 5

    Anne Marie

    This may be one of the best books that I have read on the grace God. It is like reading the Book of Romans where the Apostle Paul skillfully presents salvation by faith through God’s grace. Manning says he wrote the book “for the bedraggled, beat-up, and burnt-out,” the marginalized folks to whom Jesus ministered: the children, the ill, the tax collectors, the adulterers and extortionists. In other words, the ragamuffins. Manning understands better than most that behind our facades of order and This may be one of the best books that I have read on the grace God. It is like reading the Book of Romans where the Apostle Paul skillfully presents salvation by faith through God’s grace. Manning says he wrote the book “for the bedraggled, beat-up, and burnt-out,” the marginalized folks to whom Jesus ministered: the children, the ill, the tax collectors, the adulterers and extortionists. In other words, the ragamuffins. Manning understands better than most that behind our facades of order and self-assurance are inadequacies that can find healing only in Jesus. Brennan challenges the reader to move past regret and shame, and move forward to seeking God's love again, eschewing sin in the process. This book highlights a mistake we often make in our understanding of God...and corrects it. Sometimes it is so easy to feel that we are not good enough, or that we must somehow “earn” our place in the heart of God. But Manning reminds us that this is not the way of God. He loved us “while we were yet sinners” and died for us.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nile

    I must first say that I agree with some of what Manning says and the underlying premise that we are all filthy, wretched sinners and there is nothing we can do to change that. The issue I take is that you can take this and go two ways: 1. Christ's blood removes my sins and the Spirit dwells in me to give me power for victory in sin, a desire to do battle with sin, and freedom in failures because I know that it was due to my reliance on self rather than Christ. 2. Christ's blood removes my sins and I must first say that I agree with some of what Manning says and the underlying premise that we are all filthy, wretched sinners and there is nothing we can do to change that. The issue I take is that you can take this and go two ways: 1. Christ's blood removes my sins and the Spirit dwells in me to give me power for victory in sin, a desire to do battle with sin, and freedom in failures because I know that it was due to my reliance on self rather than Christ. 2. Christ's blood removes my sins and now I will limp along. The final two chapters are entitled "The Victorious Limp" - "The biblical image of the victorious life reads more like the victorious limp." pg182 and then "A Touch of Folly" - "Does it not require a fair bit of lunacy to listen to the loony tunes of the ragamuffin gospel?" He has gems like: "many of us pretend to believe we are sinners. Consequently, all we can do is pretend to believe we have been forgiven." pg136 "If we weren't sinners and didn't need pardon more than bread, we'd have no way of knowing how deep God's love is." pg 188 Also, there are sooo many stories that do not seem to tie into what he is saying and he only tells a small portion of each one so that I don't really know what he is talking about. Honestly, I think I really did not like his writing style. There was more storytelling than him speaking on his own behalf and random, unreferenced stories outnumbered biblical foundations 10:1 (estimation). Example on page 54 - monk runs from tiger, climbs down a rope from a cliff, sees jagged rocks below, mice chewing the rope above, and a strawberry half way. "If he had been preoccupied with the rock below (the future) or the tiger above (the past), he would have missed the strawberry God was giving him." After multiple readings, I cannot tell you how this fit into what was written before or after this.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    FIRST TIME READING: I absolutely loved this book. It's true that he says a lot of controversial things, but it's very thought-provoking. It caused me to take a long hard look at my spirituality. For a long time I felt like I didn't measure up to God's expectations and I was constantly frustrated because I never felt like I was good enough. Now I know I'm not good enough -- and it's okay! I am loved anyway. :) Brennan Manning does a beautiful job illuminating God's love. SECOND TIME READING: This FIRST TIME READING: I absolutely loved this book. It's true that he says a lot of controversial things, but it's very thought-provoking. It caused me to take a long hard look at my spirituality. For a long time I felt like I didn't measure up to God's expectations and I was constantly frustrated because I never felt like I was good enough. Now I know I'm not good enough -- and it's okay! I am loved anyway. :) Brennan Manning does a beautiful job illuminating God's love. SECOND TIME READING: This is my second time reading this book. The first time around, I gave it 5 stars and a positively gushing review. This time, I just don't know. Spiritually and emotionally, I'm in a much different place than I was a few years ago. Maybe that has something to do with it. I had a hard time getting through it, and found myself getting more and more frustrated and confused. Someone recommended that I read this book because I am having self-perception issues, but I feel like the book just made it worse. If I had to sum up the message of this book, I think it would pretty much be, "You are a piece of crap, but luckily for you, God loves you anyway." I also think he puts some statements in there just for shock value, like saying that prostitutes are more welcome in Heaven than Christians are because prostitutes are more aware of their sins, or something to that effect. I don't know, maybe the problem is me, but I just didn't "get it."

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    While I'm typically not a fan of the "Christian Living" books, this one I've held onto and re-read (and passed along) because it is unique in its purpose and message. It's not for someone who thinks they "have it all together"; it's for the jaded, broken, wandering & wondering. I don't think the "average Christian" is open to or even capable of truly understanding its message. This book "gave a body" to this abstract, difficult-to-grasp concept of grace and the part it should play in our While I'm typically not a fan of the "Christian Living" books, this one I've held onto and re-read (and passed along) because it is unique in its purpose and message. It's not for someone who thinks they "have it all together"; it's for the jaded, broken, wandering & wondering. I don't think the "average Christian" is open to or even capable of truly understanding its message. This book "gave a body" to this abstract, difficult-to-grasp concept of grace and the part it should play in our daily lives and how we relate to God. For me, it helped to read it more than once, though. The first time may mostly acclimate the reader to the concepts being presented; the second time through drives it home a little more clearly I think. Manning's understanding of and perspective on grace has played a significant role in changing my own, and it has been a wonderful change that has not stopped at one particular point. I am still learning and growing in this idea of what it really means to live in God's grace.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Tackett

    A feel-good gospel. Many of the points put forth in the book are unbiblical and contribute little towards the discipleship of God's people. Beyond these things, the book gets incredibly redundant after the first couple of chapters. I read this as a part of a small group bible study. While it did provoke discussion, it was generally to refute something Manning had said.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    4 stars. Brennan Manning seems to be one of these authors who is not concerned with theology (in fact he seems to be anti-theologians in general), which makes him quite difficult to read for someone like me who values theology! He can be vague and imprecise, he doesn't guard against misunderstandings, or explore the theological implications of his statements. He's also very reactionary, against all forms of legalism. I suspect I have significant differences with him on significant issues - but I 4 stars. Brennan Manning seems to be one of these authors who is not concerned with theology (in fact he seems to be anti-theologians in general), which makes him quite difficult to read for someone like me who values theology! He can be vague and imprecise, he doesn't guard against misunderstandings, or explore the theological implications of his statements. He's also very reactionary, against all forms of legalism. I suspect I have significant differences with him on significant issues - but I can't be sure, because he's not concerned about those issues! However, his core message is powerful and refreshing -- that Jesus accepts broken sinners, and that we all inevitably fall into the trap of thinking we need to be/become good enough to deserve God's love. He's a refreshing challenge to my own middle-class evangelical inhibitions, and a lifeline to me as someone who is so often trapped in alternating guilt or pride. Despite my reservations, I am understanding the gospel better as I read his book. It speaks directly to my biggest blindspots, which I drift into repeatedly, through the refreshment of the simple gospel of the grace of Jesus.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    I probably would have eaten this book up in college. Would have given it 5 stars and raved about it. But, then, I didn't actually read that much of my Bible back then. Now I read it. All if it. Not just the pretty parts. And I've discovered a multidimensional God who is bigger and more complex than Manning's half-realized sweeping claims at logic and truth. I'm grateful for a loving God. I'm grateful to be saved by grace. But Manning's version of God is a 2 dimensional fairy tale.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kris

    Heartfelt encouragement to rest contentedly in the love, hope, and peace that is the gospel of grace. Frankly, this book didn't meet my rather high expectations, but I'm not too surprised that it fell short of the mark. Simplistic and unorganized at times, that still doesn't diminish its power to portray grace in beautiful ways.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    4.5 stars A solid book with a much needed, grace-filled message. I highly recommend it. At the same time, the pithy stories got on my nerves a little bit. I think my expectations might have been a little too high. See Kris's review.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    Apparently this book was first published in 1990 and is now considered a classic, but I had never previously heard of Brennan Manning. I started to read the book because I was given it... and continued because I was so impressed by the writing, and encouraged by the content. The book is, as the final chapter says, 'unbalanced'. It focuses on God's unconditional love for mankind, and the saving power of Jesus. It tries to help Christians to understand what they mean when they use the oft-quoted Apparently this book was first published in 1990 and is now considered a classic, but I had never previously heard of Brennan Manning. I started to read the book because I was given it... and continued because I was so impressed by the writing, and encouraged by the content. The book is, as the final chapter says, 'unbalanced'. It focuses on God's unconditional love for mankind, and the saving power of Jesus. It tries to help Christians to understand what they mean when they use the oft-quoted phrase about 'saved by grace'. It points out that we're all 'ragamuffins' - he deliberately doesn't use the word 'sinners', perhaps because that flows all too easily off the tongue. Instead, the picture of a ragamuffin is used throughout. Someone like Oliver Twist, perhaps: with nothing of beauty, no reason for anyone to care for us, nothing in ourselves that merits attention. Yet God loves us anyway, with the deep and passionate love of a father. We don't have to do anything to merit his grace. As Philip Yancey says in his book on the same subject: there's nothing we can do that will make God love us more, and nothing we can do that will make God love us less. Does that mean we can do whatever we like, that our lifestyle doesn't matter? Of course not. Manning doesn't focus on our response, or Christian living, but there are many books which do. Of course God has standards, and we're called to holiness. But we don't have to strive for it, or struggle in our own strength. We accept God's love, take hold of his hand, and then find ourselves motivated to follow his commands and guidance. Will we ever succeed? Of course not, but every little step in the right direction is worth taking. All in all, I thought this an excellent book. Well-written with an interesting style, including relevant anecdotes now and again, and often inspiring. There weren't any brand new insights, to be sure, but for those struggling with the concept of works vs grace, or caught up in legalistic forms of Christianity, I recommend it most highly. Re-read 2012; I found it inspiring and encouraging all over again. Definitely recommended.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Merriman

    This is one of those rare books that I always seem to purchase but never seem to have on hand. I am forever reading and re-reading this, only to highlight it mercilessly and then foist in on some unsuspecting friend. Manning's individual books, in my opinion, are somewhat indistinguishable from each other, which is not to say that's a bad thing. He focuses, in general, on a woefully forgotten tenant of Christendom - the unconditional Love and Acceptance from God, on all His creations. This is This is one of those rare books that I always seem to purchase but never seem to have on hand. I am forever reading and re-reading this, only to highlight it mercilessly and then foist in on some unsuspecting friend. Manning's individual books, in my opinion, are somewhat indistinguishable from each other, which is not to say that's a bad thing. He focuses, in general, on a woefully forgotten tenant of Christendom - the unconditional Love and Acceptance from God, on all His creations. This is the book he's probably most well known for, possibly in part due to the fact that it inspired Rich Mullins later in his life and he spoke candidly about how much Manning and this book influenced the way he lived as a Christian. This is well-placed praise, because this book is a relentless reminder of how far every single person is from God and how very little that matters when it comes to how badly He wants us back. Perhaps the single most unique aspect of this - that Manning manages to hit home on pretty much every single page - is the focus on the pervasive sin that all people willingly and happily commit and how, even if we don't change our ways and become saints before we're called Home, that doesn't change the fact that God still wants us HOME. The acceptance doesn't begin at the baptismal font, it begins long before we're even aware of it. Manning's own life of mistakes and failings has made him brilliantly open to those of everyone else he encounters and this book is his attempt at teaching us to do the same. It's a book for anyone who finds themselves in the midst of sin, big or small - which means it's for everyone.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Waring-Crane

    Once I began reading it I put other books aside. Who doesn't love a good writer who weaves the work of others -- Dostoevsky, Dillard, Kung, Flannery O'Connor, Burghardt, et al -- into his personal story presenting a joyful, really good news, approach to faith? There's something winsome about a priest who leaves the priesthood to marry and also writes about his journey as a recovering alcoholic. Best of all, here is a Christina writer who doesn't eschew the faith journey of other traditions. Once I began reading it I put other books aside. Who doesn't love a good writer who weaves the work of others -- Dostoevsky, Dillard, Kung, Flannery O'Connor, Burghardt, et al -- into his personal story presenting a joyful, really good news, approach to faith? There's something winsome about a priest who leaves the priesthood to marry and also writes about his journey as a recovering alcoholic. Best of all, here is a Christina writer who doesn't eschew the faith journey of other traditions. There is no pretense of hierarchy of belief here. "Compassionate love is the axis of the Christian moral revolution and the only sign ever given by Jesus by which a disciple could be recognized." "...gentleness toward ourselves constitutes the core of our gentleness with others. ...the way of gentleness brings healing to ourselves and gentleness toward ourselves brings gentleness to others...Solidarity...frees the one who receives compassion and liberates the one who gives it in the conscious awareness "I am the other."" "Christianity is not primarily a moral code but a grace laden mystery; it is not essentially a philosophy of love but a love affair; it is not keeping rules with clenched fists but receiving a gift with open hands." Happily, I snagged this copy at a library book sale so felt no qualms wielding my pencil as I read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Gregg

    Brennan Manning wrote The Ragamuffin Gospel "for the bedraggled, beat-up, and burnt-out," the marginalized folks to whom Jesus ministered: the children, the ill, the tax collectors, the women. In other words, the ragamuffins. Grace is defined as "the freely given and unmerited favor and love of God." But, as Manning points out, we have "twisted the gospel of grace into religious bondage and distorted the image of God into an eternal, small-minded bookkeeper." In reality, God offers us grace Brennan Manning wrote The Ragamuffin Gospel "for the bedraggled, beat-up, and burnt-out," the marginalized folks to whom Jesus ministered: the children, the ill, the tax collectors, the women. In other words, the ragamuffins. Grace is defined as "the freely given and unmerited favor and love of God." But, as Manning points out, we have "twisted the gospel of grace into religious bondage and distorted the image of God into an eternal, small-minded bookkeeper." In reality, God offers us grace immeasurable. Brennan Manning gently encourages us to embrace that grace in the face of our greatest needs. And Manning certainly knows whereof he speaks, having taken a journey from priesthood and academic achievement through a collapse into alcoholism. Manning came face to face with his need, finally abandoning himself to grace. And he invites us now to join him in a life of grace. --Patricia Klein (Amazon review)

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jim Dressner

    "In these pages, I have stuttered and stammered in a halting attempt to hint at the shattering reality of the furious love of God." So the author describes his intent and provides an apt, one-line summary of the book. Written against the backdrop of the author's legalistic upbringing (as well as all-too-frequent encounters with judgmental Christians), this book effusively champions the grace of God. Sometimes the writing soars; occasionally it stumbles; but it always retains its sincerity and its "In these pages, I have stuttered and stammered in a halting attempt to hint at the shattering reality of the furious love of God." So the author describes his intent and provides an apt, one-line summary of the book. Written against the backdrop of the author's legalistic upbringing (as well as all-too-frequent encounters with judgmental Christians), this book effusively champions the grace of God. Sometimes the writing soars; occasionally it stumbles; but it always retains its sincerity and its heart. While it is easy to quibble with the author on some points, he makes a persuasive case for God as an eager-to-love parent who is thrilled with his children. Well worth reading--and probably re-reading every few years.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.