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SEAL Team Six: Memoirs of an Elite Navy SEAL Sniper

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The New York Times best sellingbook that takes you inside SEAL Team Six – the covert squad that killed Osama Bin Laden. SEAL Team Six is a secret unit tasked with counterterrorism, hostage rescue, and counterinsurgency. In this dramatic, behind-the-scenes chronicle, Howard Wasdin takes readers deep inside the world of Navy SEALS and Special Forces snipers, beginning with The New York Times best selling book that takes you inside SEAL Team Six – the covert squad that killed Osama Bin Laden. SEAL Team Six is a secret unit tasked with counterterrorism, hostage rescue, and counterinsurgency. In this dramatic, behind-the-scenes chronicle, Howard Wasdin takes readers deep inside the world of Navy SEALS and Special Forces snipers, beginning with the grueling selection process of Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/S)—the toughest and longest military training in the world.After graduating, Wasdin faced new challenges. First there was combat in Operation Desert Storm as a member of SEAL Team Two. Then the Green Course: the selection process to join the legendary SEAL Team Six, with a curriculum that included practiced land warfare to unarmed combat. More than learning how to pick a lock, they learned how to blow the door off its hinges. Finally as a member of SEAL Team Six he graduated from the most storied and challenging sniper program in the country: The Marine’s Scout Sniper School. Eventually, of the 18 snipers in SEAL Team Six, Wasdin became the best—which meant one of the best snipers on the planet.Less than half a year after sniper school, he was fighting for his life. The mission: capture or kill Somalian warlord Mohamed Farrah Aidid. From rooftops, helicopters and alleys, Wasdin hunted Aidid and killed his men whenever possible. But everything went quickly to hell when his small band of soldiers found themselves fighting for their lives, cut off from help, and desperately trying to rescue downed comrades during a routine mission. The Battle of Mogadishu, as it become known, left 18 American soldiers dead and 73 wounded. Howard Wasdin had both of his legs nearly blown off while engaging the enemy. His dramatic combat tales combined with inside details of becoming one of the world’s deadliest snipers make this one of the most explosive military memoirs in years.  


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The New York Times best sellingbook that takes you inside SEAL Team Six – the covert squad that killed Osama Bin Laden. SEAL Team Six is a secret unit tasked with counterterrorism, hostage rescue, and counterinsurgency. In this dramatic, behind-the-scenes chronicle, Howard Wasdin takes readers deep inside the world of Navy SEALS and Special Forces snipers, beginning with The New York Times best selling book that takes you inside SEAL Team Six – the covert squad that killed Osama Bin Laden. SEAL Team Six is a secret unit tasked with counterterrorism, hostage rescue, and counterinsurgency. In this dramatic, behind-the-scenes chronicle, Howard Wasdin takes readers deep inside the world of Navy SEALS and Special Forces snipers, beginning with the grueling selection process of Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/S)—the toughest and longest military training in the world.After graduating, Wasdin faced new challenges. First there was combat in Operation Desert Storm as a member of SEAL Team Two. Then the Green Course: the selection process to join the legendary SEAL Team Six, with a curriculum that included practiced land warfare to unarmed combat. More than learning how to pick a lock, they learned how to blow the door off its hinges. Finally as a member of SEAL Team Six he graduated from the most storied and challenging sniper program in the country: The Marine’s Scout Sniper School. Eventually, of the 18 snipers in SEAL Team Six, Wasdin became the best—which meant one of the best snipers on the planet.Less than half a year after sniper school, he was fighting for his life. The mission: capture or kill Somalian warlord Mohamed Farrah Aidid. From rooftops, helicopters and alleys, Wasdin hunted Aidid and killed his men whenever possible. But everything went quickly to hell when his small band of soldiers found themselves fighting for their lives, cut off from help, and desperately trying to rescue downed comrades during a routine mission. The Battle of Mogadishu, as it become known, left 18 American soldiers dead and 73 wounded. Howard Wasdin had both of his legs nearly blown off while engaging the enemy. His dramatic combat tales combined with inside details of becoming one of the world’s deadliest snipers make this one of the most explosive military memoirs in years.  

30 review for SEAL Team Six: Memoirs of an Elite Navy SEAL Sniper

  1. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    SPOILER ALERT I found this book OK at first but then I got bored by listening to Wasdin's hypocrisy. "I hate the damn liberal media", oh unless I am trying to make a buck selling my book, then they are OK. He talks about how he respects all the other soldiers and then goes on to say how much better his SEALs and Delta are. He talks about how in Somalia they did not hang out with the Rangers because they were above them. Then, later goes on, many times, saying how they fought bravely. Pretty SPOILER ALERT I found this book OK at first but then I got bored by listening to Wasdin's hypocrisy. "I hate the damn liberal media", oh unless I am trying to make a buck selling my book, then they are OK. He talks about how he respects all the other soldiers and then goes on to say how much better his SEALs and Delta are. He talks about how in Somalia they did not hang out with the Rangers because they were above them. Then, later goes on, many times, saying how they fought bravely. Pretty condescending if you ask me. He and his buddies beat up a Tunisian guy in a bar for criticizing the USA, then they beat up the bouncer when he tries to stop them from leaving. When the cops arrive they take them on. I guess he takes his oath to defend the US Constitution (freedom of speech) seriously. Oh, and when they finally go their court date the judge dismissed all charges based on the fact that they are serving our country. I am pretty sure that joining the service, no matter how elite, does not make you above the law. I guess Wasdin and the judge disagree. He also talks about brands (sunglasses and knives and pants) more than my sister did when we were in high school, and that was a lot. I especially like when he goes to a church Brother after he has killed someone about how it will affect his time in eternity. He is assured that it won't affect him negatively. OK, I guess this brother knows all. I will never question the morals of what I am doing again. Brother Ron said its OK. And he must be right. It is pretty weird how he can ask one guy if its OK (as if he is asking god himself) and when he gets an answer he likes he accepts it as truth. Oh, then there are the animals that he klls for fun. He stomps a captured rat with his foot. Kills many Kangaroos, one wild pig, a deer, gazelles, and impala, and tortures a goat or two by shooting and stabbing it in multiple locations. The goat torture was to learn how to save other soldiers. I am sure the best way to learn how to save a human being from a gunshot is to practice on goats. The guy sounds like a jerk, and since he write the book I'm guessing its pretty accurate on that account. I have a friend that was a NAVY Seal and know a guy that was in SF in Norway, and found them to be more than professional and mature. They knew how to have fun but would never start a fight. They would fight to win if they had no other choices but they were always the ones saying "lets just walk away." I enjoyed reading about the training and the missions but I did not like who I was reading about, especially his arrogance. Finally, the fact is that the book is pretty poorly written. My review is probably poorly written but then I an a scientist not a writer. If you like this kind of book I really recommend Jarhead. Its a better book and the writing is very good. The author is also more likable. Here is another funny thing. On goodreads I have only received agreeing comments on this review. I posted the same review on Kindle/Amazon and people were angry. I was berated and ridiculed as unpatriotic.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Pamela

    Told in straightforward unadorned prose, this is one man's search for himself that takes him from an abusive childhood into war and home again. Through Wasdin's experience we travel with him from a rural upbringing and into the U.S. Navy, where Wasdin's experience as a battered child gives him something of an edge —an advantage that becomes clear when he decides to enter the SEALs. Eventually a sniper in the elite SEAL Team Six unit, Wasdin served in Mogadishu during the battle made famous in Told in straightforward unadorned prose, this is one man's search for himself that takes him from an abusive childhood into war and home again. Through Wasdin's experience we travel with him from a rural upbringing and into the U.S. Navy, where Wasdin's experience as a battered child gives him something of an edge — an advantage that becomes clear when he decides to enter the SEALs. Eventually a sniper in the elite SEAL Team Six unit, Wasdin served in Mogadishu during the battle made famous in the film Black Hawk Down. Badly injured, he returns home, where he has to put the pieces of his life together without the structure of the military — the marriage he neglected, the daughter who eventually stays with her mother, the son who clings to him, the injuries that cause him pain and the search for a role outside the SEALs. I disagree with reviewers who say that Wasdin's ego makes this book difficult to enjoy. Yes, he's proud of the SEALs and often views them as superior to other special ops and special warfare units, but, hey, it's not uncommon for someone to cheer for their own team. I can only say that Wasdin's story touched me deeply as a very human story. I never saw him as a mindlessly arrogant SOB. I felt he was subtly critiquing himself for some of those attitudes through the plain, sometimes self-deprecating tone of his writing. The insight into elite sniper training was fascinating, as were all other aspects of Wasdin's military experience. As a woman who would never be able to serve in one of these units and has not been in the military, it's as close as I'll probably ever get to understanding what it's like. I cringed to read about the inept actions of the U.S. government during this time, as well as bungling among military brass. With human lives on the line, one hopes these organizations have resolved some of the issues that led to the deaths of U.S. servicemen in Mogadishu, such as men in the helos not being able to communicate directly with men on the ground. I was absorbed by the story from cover to cover and found myself tearing up at the end when Wasdin finds peace helping to heal the injured as a chiropractor. I should add that Wasdin uses what is considered to be "foul language." This doesn't bother me at all (I've never understood why people get upset over words). Words don't scare me. There is also some graphic retelling of battles that could be upsetting to some. I suspect those people won't pick it up anyway. It isn't a book about bunny rabbits and flowers, after all. I'd recommend this book to fans of SEAL fiction, as well as anyone looking for a deeper understanding of the SEALs.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Steven Kent

    This is NOT NOT NOT a novel. It is the real-life memoirs of a real-life member of Seal Team Six. For those of you who, like me, are not familiar with the various Seal teams, SEAL Team Six is as elite among the SEALs as the SEALs are elite among sailors. These are the guys who do the hardest jobs assigned to the SEALs. For decades, they seemed to only exist as rumors and sightings, sort of a cross between James Bond, Bigfoot and G.I. Joe. Howard Wasdin, the author of this book, was an adrenaline This is NOT NOT NOT a novel. It is the real-life memoirs of a real-life member of Seal Team Six. For those of you who, like me, are not familiar with the various Seal teams, SEAL Team Six is as elite among the SEALs as the SEALs are elite among sailors. These are the guys who do the hardest jobs assigned to the SEALs. For decades, they seemed to only exist as rumors and sightings, sort of a cross between James Bond, Bigfoot and G.I. Joe. Howard Wasdin, the author of this book, was an adrenaline junkie, an athlete, a patriot, a bruiser, and a man of discipline. No one lacking any of these qualities can make it as a SEAL. Wasdin's memoirs are sometimes as informational as a military briefing and as intimate as a dinner conversation. He begins by discussing his physically abusive stepfather, moves on to his sometimes violent youth, segueing into his induction into Navy in Search and Rescue, his move to the SEALs, and then his migration to SEAL Team Six, and eventually his release back into civilian life. Wasdin fought in Mogadishu. He was there the day the the Somalis downed the Blackhawk helicopters and he earned medals for his heroism. Wasdin chronicles his entire evolution, step-by-step in this book. It never gets dull. Knowing what his readers came to learn, he describes his training, gives detailed accounts of rifles, equipment, and techniques; then pays particular attention to the bloody, awful shootout in Somalia. He's very candid, at times airing venomous anger toward the Clinton administration and the Italian peace keepers whom he accuses of ignoring and even aiding Somali warlords. This is not a perfect book but it is a very engaging look into a world that few people can enter or would ever be able to survive.

  4. 5 out of 5

    deep

    Wasdin succeeds at painting himself as a d-bag using his difficult childhood to win weapons and training to become a d-bag with a license to kill. In between numerous accounts of how various groups of human beings would cower in shock and awe, and the superficial philosophical awakenings, there is enough operational insight into the SEALs to leave you just feeling contempt for the author rather than having wasted your time entirely for not giving up at the first mention of Coors Light.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Kirchner

    If you've read a lot of books on SEALs, you'll start to connect various operators and missions that crop up again and again, which is interesting to note. The books aren't incredibly indepth because they can't be. And because SEALs (probably by training) aren't the most introspective types, you don't hear a lot of internal analysis about their lives, feelings, or families. That kind of thought process would paralyze men used to life-in-the-moment action. If you've read lots of SEALs books, the If you've read a lot of books on SEALs, you'll start to connect various operators and missions that crop up again and again, which is interesting to note. The books aren't incredibly indepth because they can't be. And because SEALs (probably by training) aren't the most introspective types, you don't hear a lot of internal analysis about their lives, feelings, or families. That kind of thought process would paralyze men used to life-in-the-moment action. If you've read lots of SEALs books, the language gets a bit monotonous after awhile. It's very hooyah, but that's their makeup. It has given me an insight on how people can survive and thrive despite incredible odds to the contrary. I used to think being brave was a willful decision. But these guys are set up for this work by high pain threshold, long training for toughness, low fear factor (they don't get rattled) and mental makeup. A ton of this is training and environment, but a lot of it is their emotional makeup as well. I've noticed in reading SEALs books that a lot of these guys had rougher than usual childhoods. They learned things like hypervigilance, hard work, imperviousness to pain, and an ability to wall things off emotionally that set them up well to be SEALs. Interesting read but nothing surprising. I find these books don't go deep enough for me, but they can't. A good read is Marcus Luttrell's SEALs memoir "Lone Survivor."

  6. 5 out of 5

    Amelia

    If "Seal Team Six" was a movie, I envision it staring Dane Cook and Jesse Metcalfe, produced by Michael Bay and set to the soundtrack of Lincoln Park. It would cost millions to make, but be slammed by critics and make barely any money at the box office. There are elements of the military I will never understand. I get that. But I really felt uncomfortable that an elite military member was bragging about such acts he says are just part of military life that I believe are a rare exception to the If "Seal Team Six" was a movie, I envision it staring Dane Cook and Jesse Metcalfe, produced by Michael Bay and set to the soundtrack of Lincoln Park. It would cost millions to make, but be slammed by critics and make barely any money at the box office. There are elements of the military I will never understand. I get that. But I really felt uncomfortable that an elite military member was bragging about such acts he says are just part of military life that I believe are a rare exception to the people that serve our country. He made Seal Team Six seem like a wild frat, where the guys high-five over dying prisoners, beat-up a guy in a bar for bashing America, torture animals, fight police officers and, overall, consider themselves above the law because they're SEAL TEAM SIX. You're not patriotic, you're just a d-bag. Frankly, I had a hard time trying to respect these men. His attitude ruined it for me. (The cocky tone of the guy reading this on audiobook didn't help). I found his ego insulting to the men that have honorably served our country with respect.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Poletti

    SEAL Team Six is the memoir of Howard Wasdin, a country boy from Georgia who becomes a sniper in the Navy SEALs. Wasdin’s memoir gives the reader a glimpse into his troubled boyhood, filled with abuse and poverty. The difficulties of his childhood help him later in life as he goes through the grueling, often painful training to become a Navy SEAL. Wasdin takes several detours in the road of life and makes several missteps; his honesty is refreshing as he discusses his childhood, his failed SEAL Team Six is the memoir of Howard Wasdin, a country boy from Georgia who becomes a sniper in the Navy SEALs. Wasdin’s memoir gives the reader a glimpse into his troubled boyhood, filled with abuse and poverty. The difficulties of his childhood help him later in life as he goes through the grueling, often painful training to become a Navy SEAL. Wasdin takes several detours in the road of life and makes several missteps; his honesty is refreshing as he discusses his childhood, his failed marriage to his high school sweetheart, his extensive training, his recovery from life-threatening injuries, and his faith. The part that will probably interest most readers is Wasdin’s participation in U.S. operations in Somalia in the 1990s and his first-hand account of what has become known as Black Hawk Down. Wasdin does not spare details about the military; he offers information on how different branches work together (or not), how the soldiers let off steam, and the competition that drives the men and agencies. His perspective on U.S. leadership might be “touchy” for some readers because he is straight-forward with his opinions. He also offers a beautiful glimpse into the humanity of the U.S. military when he tells the story of a young Somali boy who needed medication and was instead being left to die. The SEALs broke into the boy’s home, held him down, and administered the necessary medication – while making certain the boy’s family did not kill Wasdin and his team. Readers who enjoy military exploits and true “reality” will find SEAL Team Six to be a powerful, if disturbing read. The incident now known as Black Hawk Down has the potential to anger readers because it was senseless and could have been avoided. Many good soldiers died and many more were injured in an exploit that had trouble written on it from its beginning. Wasdin’s graphic accounting is not for the faint of heart, but it is a worthwhile read for those up to the challenge.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Virginia

    Utterly fascinating. Although the writing style was at times choppy (cutting in and out of stories), I thoroughly enjoyed the "realness" of the voice. Wasdin and Templin did very well in sounding like Wasdin! (If that makes any sense...) Ever since SEAL Team Six made the news because of killing Osama Bin Laden, I've come across numerous articles about the team. I ended up reading an excerpt from this book and I just had to read the rest. I was not disappointed!! Let me just say that I have the Utterly fascinating. Although the writing style was at times choppy (cutting in and out of stories), I thoroughly enjoyed the "realness" of the voice. Wasdin and Templin did very well in sounding like Wasdin! (If that makes any sense...) Ever since SEAL Team Six made the news because of killing Osama Bin Laden, I've come across numerous articles about the team. I ended up reading an excerpt from this book and I just had to read the rest. I was not disappointed!! Let me just say that I have the utmost respect, admiration and thanks for our military and getting some behind the scenes glimpses into the SEALs was just awesome. I know that there is no way in this lifetime (or in many other lifetimes) that I would be able to accomplish even a tenth of what the SEALs do just for training. It is mind-boggling. Fantastic and gripping read!!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sherwood Smith

    Wrapped around another memoir of the Mogadishu action that also inspired Black Hawk Down and similar works, Howard Wasdin, with the aid of a ghostwriter, relates his life history. beginning with the extremely violent abuse by his step-father. He's right that in those days what happened in the home stayed in the home; he expresses a certain amount of insight into the consequences of abuse, without quite seeing the whole picture, which rings true for those of us of a certain age. He works back and Wrapped around another memoir of the Mogadishu action that also inspired Black Hawk Down and similar works, Howard Wasdin, with the aid of a ghostwriter, relates his life history. beginning with the extremely violent abuse by his step-father. He's right that in those days what happened in the home stayed in the home; he expresses a certain amount of insight into the consequences of abuse, without quite seeing the whole picture, which rings true for those of us of a certain age. He works back and forth through time, covering his training to become a SEAL, and finally covers the details of that action in Somalia, before segueing to the present.I found it absorbing reading, sometimes lightened by humor, sometimes sharply painful.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Amy Hardison

    I loved this book. It gave me such an appreciation for what it means to be a Navy SEAL and especially to be on SEAL Team Six. Having read this in July, I was devastated when the helicopter was shot down in Afghanistan on Aug 6, killing 35 Navy SEALs from SEAL Team 6. I understood the incredible loss this was to America and to the SEAL team program. I felt great sadness for having lost so many who loved the United States enough to put their life in danger over and over. Even without the disaster I loved this book. It gave me such an appreciation for what it means to be a Navy SEAL and especially to be on SEAL Team Six. Having read this in July, I was devastated when the helicopter was shot down in Afghanistan on Aug 6, killing 35 Navy SEALs from SEAL Team 6. I understood the incredible loss this was to America and to the SEAL team program. I felt great sadness for having lost so many who loved the United States enough to put their life in danger over and over. Even without the disaster in Afghanistan, this autogbiography was a incredible read. I highly recommend it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    G.M. Burrow

    Wasdin's Christianity moves to the front as his story closes, and ends up being the best thing about this book. His self-told account isn't as gripping or detail-packed as Lone Survivor, but his childhood, his training, and his survival of several wars still roll out a great story. Plus, he was SEAL Team Six. Beat that.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    The parts about SEAL training are interesting. Less so is everything after that. And even less so is his reliance on grade-school terms, like "booger eaters" and "pee-pee." It basically reinforces every stereotype about military guys, and also diminishes how intelligent the special ops guys are supposed to be.

  13. 4 out of 5

    dbbks3

    I read other reviews putting down Wasdin and the Seals. I disagree. I am a Liberal and a Democrate, but I did not have the problems many reviewers seem to have hadwith this bio. Maybe because I am of the Vietnam Era. I knew members of Seals who served there. I know what they went through on their return. I knew men who were military snipers. A hard job that does protect those who protect civilians. I spent my professional life in the criminal justice system. Not easy but not as hard as the I read other reviews putting down Wasdin and the Seals. I disagree. I am a Liberal and a Democrate, but I did not have the problems many reviewers seem to have hadwith this bio. Maybe because I am of the Vietnam Era. I knew members of Seals who served there. I know what they went through on their return. I knew men who were military snipers. A hard job that does protect those who protect civilians. I spent my professional life in the criminal justice system. Not easy but not as hard as the career these men choose. If you read the details of the kangeroo killings you would see that it was a santioned hunt for animals that were harming the farming industry. Similar to our hunts to bring the deer population under control. The goats helped save lives. Put things in prospective. Rats? Do you wish to sleep and eat with rats? If a rat is in your house would you hesitate to call an exterminator? Don't kid yourself. Do not judge from your safe home. Wasdin's early life was more than harsh. He was lucky to make it to adulthood alive. Of course it affected his life. In adulthood he came to terms with the brutal life he experienced. A small child with no one willing to stand up for him. He spent his life standing up for others. His Team became his family. To be a Seal or Delta one must have a strong ego and drive. He gives the reader information about training, missions and the necessity of teamwork. Wasdin freely admits to being a egotistical jerk. He laughs at some of his superhero thinking. That show his growth. If he still felt that way, he would not have the insight to write about it. He would have spent more time on describing his medals instead of the medals of others. He would not have made his late in life career decision. I am glad I read this book. I am glad there are people who are willing to dedicate their lives to serving and being the best at what they do. I do not have to approve of the conflict to admire and support the men and women who serve in that conflict. We should have learned this lesson with Vietnam. Is this a perfect book? No. Does Wasdin get on his soapbox at time? Yes but he bled for that right. Is it a book worth reading? Yes. It does make one think. Wasdin gives us what he promises: a book about his life before, during and after Seal Team Six. It is why we read this book. Be thankful someone is willing to be out there so we can read and write our reviews in freedom.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Definitely not as good as "Lone Survivor". Its not very well written, but interesting enough because of the details about the SEAL training, tactics, and high tech gear they get to use. Other than that, the guy comes off as extremely arrogant and almost robotic, even when attempting to humbly admit he's an egoist. And there were too many product placements- no one cares that you were wearing Oakley sunglasses when checking into your hotel. Overall a decent read about the Navy SEALs, but there Definitely not as good as "Lone Survivor". Its not very well written, but interesting enough because of the details about the SEAL training, tactics, and high tech gear they get to use. Other than that, the guy comes off as extremely arrogant and almost robotic, even when attempting to humbly admit he's an egoist. And there were too many product placements- no one cares that you were wearing Oakley sunglasses when checking into your hotel. Overall a decent read about the Navy SEALs, but there are probably better memoirs. Maybe "Black Hawk Down" will be better.....

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bo Trapnell

    Amazing and well-described background on the psyche and motivations of America's most elite warriors. Trivia: Seal Team Six, only the top tier unit of the Navy Seals, fires more 9mm ammunition each year training then the entire Marines. Wow!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jerome

    The narrative flows well for the most part, but some of it is just horribly written. The major problem with the book and specifically with the Mogadishu account was the poor writing. For example, never in the account of the running battle does Wasdin refer to the two maps provided in the book, which were obviously included to illustrate and illuminate the battle. The first map, of a large area of Mogadishu is somewhat helpful, including some street names and places. Curiously, the map has no The narrative flows well for the most part, but some of it is just horribly written. The major problem with the book and specifically with the Mogadishu account was the poor writing. For example, never in the account of the running battle does Wasdin refer to the two maps provided in the book, which were obviously included to illustrate and illuminate the battle. The first map, of a large area of Mogadishu is somewhat helpful, including some street names and places. Curiously, the map has no North direction to orient the reader when Wasdin describes the horrific circling route the convey took as they left the Olympic Hotel. The second map is a complete mystery. It is a detailed sketch of the area where one of the downed helicopters landed, with various events noted on the map that were never mentioned by Wasdin (e.g., "Blow hole in wall to make evac. route"). How this map relates to the story is for the reader to puzzle out. A second source of discord in the book's narrative included childish and denigrating insults and commentary. For example he says of "Sourpuss," a Team Six member, that he "whined," "wasn't a cutup," and that "[n]one of us liked him." Really? No one else liked him? Or maybe it was just Wasdin. He refers to a new Red Team leader as "Buttwipe," after Wasdin returns to duty from his injuries in Mogadishu. These remarks reveal more about Wasdin than about the people he describes. Other writing choices reveal the lack of editorial control or discipline that co-writer Stephen Templin could or would not overcome. Twice Wasdin says some higher up "whacked our [or my] pee-pee," referring to some kind of reprimand or discipline. This term may be used in the Navy but it really adds nothing to the story without explaining the term's significance. The obfuscation of "f***" or "f---ing" was annoying and unnecessary. Will readers seriously be offended, given the subject matter of the book? Brand names and models of weapons and equipment are frequently mentioned throughout the book, which often fleshed out the narrative, but sometimes became tedious. When Wasdin describes the attributes of the Revo sunglasses that he wore while a patrolman in Florida, the passage is such a non-sequitur to the story that one wonders whether he was paid by the company for mentioning them. Maybe I'm a cynic, but I find it hard to believe four SEALS can put the beat down on 30 police officers, with Wasdin getting a phone number from a flirtatious female officer he, an elite warrior, had just thrown against a car; another SEAL taking a bite out of a police canine; several officers ending up in the hospital; and all of this leading to the court date where the judge dismisses the case entirely for "youthful vigor" and the courtroom erupts with applause. This happens fairly early on, so I took the rest of the book with a grain of salt. The prose is choppy and simplistic. On p.129: While on a mission a bad guy is holding a fire extinguisher in a threatening manner, and the SEALs are about to shoot him when he doesn't follow orders. The author tells the SEALs not to shoot the bad guy and he subsequently smacks the author on the head with the fire extinguisher. This is his reflection: "Try to be a nice guy, and that's what happens. In retrospect, Fire Extinguisher should've gotten two to the body and one to the head. He's a lucky sonofabitch."..... He's lucky that you had a brain fart. Then on p.131 (two pages later!): The SEALs uncuff the bad guys and one of the bad guys reaches in to his jacket to get a pack of smokes. Apparently they didn't search the bad guys, because all the SEALS were about to shoot the guy thinking he was reaching for a gun. The author had this to say about the incident: "No, no, no, no, pleaded the prisoner, His eyes looked like two fried eggs. He was lucky we had such tight trigger discipline - not like the four policemen in New York who shot Amadou Diallo forty-one times reaching for his wallet." WHAT?!? The cops in New York (whom you are apparently better than) would have shot "Fire Extinguisher guy" BECAUSE HE WAS A PERCEIVED/REAL THREAT! They wouldn't have worried about "Cigarette guy", because after being cuffed and searched HE WOULDN'T HAVE BEEN A THREAT! The ironic part is the author accuses Richard Marcinko of the same "we are the awesomest" tone in Rogue Warrior!: p.122 "... if he (Marcinko) said anything to me about how everything used to be better when he was commanding officer, I'd tell him, go play your video game and blow some more smoke up your own ass." Even the author saw the tone! LOL! I also found annoying the author's attempts to be funny. I know he's just trying to be lighthearted, but some of it was just irritating: Pg. x (Glossary): "BS: Bull excrement. A synonym for dishonesty." Hilarious, Wasdin. Some things were just flat-out obvious, but Wasdin mentions them anyway: Pg. x (Glossary): "Op: operation." No, duh. Some of his opinions are a little simplistic and uninformed. Pg. 6: "I felt that if we killed Atto and Aidid, we could stop the fighting, get the food to the people quickly, and go home in one piece." Capturing or killing, what difference would it make? This is Somalia, remember? Some other warlord would just take their place and make a bigger mess of things. Remember, Atto WAS killed in 1996. Did his death bring peace to Somalia? No. Some things were just weird. Pg. 52: "The assault rifle used the same .223 ammo as the standard issue M-16 but was much easier to maintain in the jungle--and it had magazine that could hold forty rounds!" WOW! Forty rounds! How amazing! Let's put an out-of-place exclamation mark there, even though nobody cares! Pg. 174-175: "Only a few teams could really compete at that distance: SEAL Team Six, Delta, some Rangers and the Department of Energy (DoE) nuclear power plant (they had great training and equipment) sniper pairs." Alright, that phrase in parentheses was entirely unnecessary and only makes a perfectly fine sentence extremely awkward. Pg. 209: "I hate our liberal media. Must be easy to sit back an point fingers when you're not involved." First of all, what a horribly written sentence. Second, who cares? I don't care what you think about the media, Wasdin, and I don't care about them per se. Ignore them and do your job. Pg. 256: "Before the Battle of Mogadishu, the Clinton administration's support for our troops had sagged like a sack of turds. they had rejected or removed M-2 Bradley infantry fighting vehicles, M-1 Abrams tanks, and Ac-130 Spectre gunships. The Clinton camp was far more interested in maintaining political points than keeping some of America's finest troops alive." Oh, yeah, Wasdin, giant, slow, lumbering, clanking tanks in a freakin' city would have kept more of your boys alive. Not really. After the first Black Hawk crashed, the 10th Mountain Division drove around Mogadishu for fifty minutes (instead of through, because of previous ambushes). So, for the first thirty minutes Mike Durant and Super-Six-Two were on the ground, the only rescue force Garrison could muster was a hastily assembled convoy comprised mostly of support personnel. Ultimately, neither this convoy nor the QRF could fight their way in. They were barred by blockades and ambushes. Tanks would have been even slower. And, also, the task force didn't even need AC-130s. Garrison felt that they were unnecessary. The task force had plenty of AH-6 Little Birds, which provided very effective air support throughout the battle. As for armored support, Garrison didn't need any tanks or Bradleys. The whole point of Task Force Ranger's raids was speed and surprise, and up to the Battle of Mogadishu, these tactics worked. Since armored vehicles would have been assigned to the 10th Mountain Division, they would not even have been part of the Rangers' QRF.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Salvatore

    When I chose this book I had already gone through many reviews as most people do causing me to prejudge the book and almost not pick it. Unfortunately many of the reviews were not positive, and Likely because this is such a polarizing subject. This book is certainly not a literary masterpiece however I was so interested in learning about what Seal Team Six was about I decided to get it. Yes there are many subjects in the book that are upsetting and disturbing but you also have to realize the When I chose this book I had already gone through many reviews as most people do causing me to prejudge the book and almost not pick it. Unfortunately many of the reviews were not positive, and Likely because this is such a polarizing subject. This book is certainly not a literary masterpiece however I was so interested in learning about what Seal Team Six was about I decided to get it. Yes there are many subjects in the book that are upsetting and disturbing but you also have to realize the life these people live and the circles they live in. These people are Patriots fighting for their country, and just like in every group Military or not there are always going to be bad apples in the bunch. The training alone is a commitment most of us would never consider let alone be able to do. Give this book a chance hear this mans story, take if for what it is. I gave it a 4 simply because it is not perfect but still worth reading.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jack P

    This book is the most interesting book Ive ever read. Its probably the best book Ive ever read too. This book has so many details and so much action that your almost confused sometimes. Its never stale and theres always something going on in the story. The book has alot of emotions and it will make you kinda sad at some points. The story of this navy seal is incredible and he has gone through hardship his whole life yet never really shows it. This book will inspire you because you see him go This book is the most interesting book Ive ever read. Its probably the best book Ive ever read too. This book has so many details and so much action that your almost confused sometimes. Its never stale and theres always something going on in the story. The book has alot of emotions and it will make you kinda sad at some points. The story of this navy seal is incredible and he has gone through hardship his whole life yet never really shows it. This book will inspire you because you see him go through all this stuff yet still carrying on strong in life. This book is 10/10 and I recommend it to anyone who is looking for a read that makes you really feel the characters emotions and will put you in their shoes.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Evan C

    this book talks about a man that went to join the seal team and they needed four to six sniper and he asked if he could join. they said that it was his first year here and it is almost impossible to do. they said no. three days later they said that he could go the the snipper school.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    SEAL Team Six made headlines recently when they killed the world's most wanted man, Osama bin Laden, in Pakistan. Everyone wanted to know more about this elite team of the miltary's best men, and luckily former team member Howard E. Wasdin, along with Stephen Templin, had written SEAL Team Six: Memoirs of an Elite Navy SEAL Sniper. The book succeeds because it shares Wasdin's personal story, from his difficult childhood with a stepfather who beat him frequently to his success as a sniper, moving SEAL Team Six made headlines recently when they killed the world's most wanted man, Osama bin Laden, in Pakistan. Everyone wanted to know more about this elite team of the miltary's best men, and luckily former team member Howard E. Wasdin, along with Stephen Templin, had written SEAL Team Six: Memoirs of an Elite Navy SEAL Sniper. The book succeeds because it shares Wasdin's personal story, from his difficult childhood with a stepfather who beat him frequently to his success as a sniper, moving quickly up the ranks in the Navy SEALs. Wasdin tells the story of his stepfather forcing him to pick up all the pecans that fell to the ground from a tree in their yard. If his stepfather came home and found just one pecan on the ground, Wasdin would be beaten. (Never mind that the pecan could have fallen just before he came home.) From this, Wasdin learned to be thorough and that no excuses would be sufficient. He believes that this upbringing helped prepare him for the rigors and challenges of Navy and SEAL training. This insight brought to mind Jeannette Walls' memoir, The Glass Castle. She had a difficult upbringing with parents who did not know how to raise children, yet she survived and became successful in spite of the way she was raised. The resilience of the human spirit always amazes me. Wasdin brings the reader right into the middle of his training, which is fascinating. The trials that these men undergo is unbelievable, and many do not make it through. His story of medical training on goats under simulated battle conditions was incredible. During his time with the SEALS, Wasdin served in Iraq during Desert Storm. When 14 starving Iraqi soldiers surrendered to him and his partner, he had a revelation. "They were human beings, just like me. I discovered my humanity and the humanity in others. It was a turing point for me- it was when I matured." Wasdin also served in Somalia, and was involved in the Battle of Mogadishu, which was made into the book and movie, Black Hawk Down. His description of his role in the pursuit of warlord Aidid and that battle are tense and made me hold my breath as I read it. Wasdin was seriously injured in that battle. His most successful operation in Somalia involved saving a young boy. Next door to the house they were using as a secret base was a young boy who had stepped on a land mine and had a bad case of gangrene. The smell was awful and after being refused permission to help the boy and endangering their operation, Wasdin and his partner broke into the house next door, tied up the family, cleaned the boy's wound and gave him IV antibiotics. They returned two more times to help the boy and save his life. The once frightened, now thankful, family offered them tea on their last visit. He could not let that boy suffer needlessly. Seen from his perspective, Wasdin was very angry at the politics that he felt exacerbated the Somalia situation. He has some very harsh words for upper command and the Clinton administration. He believes that Aidid could have been captured, they had him sighted, but the plug was pulled. Wasdin's words on Somalia echo our current situation in Afghanistan. "We shouldn't have become involved in Somalia's civil war- this was their problem, not ours- but once we committed, we should've finished what we started ; a lesson we are required to keep relearning over and over again." SEAL Team Six will appeal to many readers; those who like military books will appreciate the in-depth look at SEAL training, and those who like a more personal story will enjoy reading Wasdin's journey from small town Southern boy to Navy SEAL to badly injured soldier to the man he is today.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Giovanni Gelati

    I don’t read too much in the way of non-fiction,if you follow my blog than you know that. This book for me just needed to be read before the Memorial Day holiday. I am not mincing words here today. If you are a supporter of Freedom , you want an inside glimpse, no matter how small it may be, into the world of the elite operators that allow us to have our barbeques, swim in ours pools, and enjoy our families this weekend while they are in the hot spots protecting us away from theirs, than this is I don’t read too much in the way of non-fiction,if you follow my blog than you know that. This book for me just needed to be read before the Memorial Day holiday. I am not mincing words here today. If you are a supporter of Freedom , you want an inside glimpse, no matter how small it may be, into the world of the elite operators that allow us to have our barbeques, swim in ours pools, and enjoy our families this weekend while they are in the hot spots protecting us away from theirs, than this is your book. Here is the synopsis: “When the navy sends their elite, they send the SEALs. When the SEALs send their elite, they send SEAL Team Six -- a secret unit tasked with counterterrorism, hostage rescue, and counterinsurgency. In this dramatic, behind-the-scenes chronicle, Howard Wasdin takes readers deep inside the world of navy SEALs and Special Forces snipers, beginning with the grueling selection process of Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL -- the toughest and longest military training in the world. After graduating, Wasdin faced new challenges. First, there was combat in Operation Desert Storm as a member of SEAL Team Two. Then, the Green Course: the selection process to join the legendary SEAL Team Six (ST6), with a curriculum that included practiced land warfare to unarmed combat. More than learning how to pick a lock, they learned how to blow the door off its hinges. Finally, as member of ST6, he graduated from the most storied and challenging sniper program in the country: the Marine Corps Scout Sniper School. Eventually, of the eighteen snipers in ST6, Wasdin became the best -- which meant one of the best snipers on the planet. Less than half a year after sniper school, he was fighting for his life. The mission: capture or kill Somalian warlord Mohamed Farrah Aidid. From rooftops, helicopters, and alleys, Wasdin hunted Aidid and killed his men whenever possible. But everything went quickly to hell when his small band of soldiers found themselves fighting for their lives, cut off from help and desperately trying to rescue downed comrades during a routine mission. The Battle of Mogadishu, as it became known, left eighteen American soldiers dead and seventy-three wounded. Howard Wasdin had both of his legs nearly blown off while engaging the enemy. His explosive combat tales and inside details of becoming one of the world's deadliest snipers combine to make this the most thrilling and important memoir by a navy SEAL since Lone Survivor.” The read on this is compelling, heartfelt, and well done. I think it is by far one of the best books I have read on this type material in quite some time. The other one that comes to mind for me is the Oliver North book on The Special Forces Heroes I posted on around Christmas time. I don’t hesitate to suggest this book. Enjoy ! Things have changed around here. I am now the published author by Trestle Press of “Down Low- Dead” with Vincent Zandri, “The Jersey Shore Has Eyes” with Big Daddy Abel”, “G.S.I Gelati’s Scoop Investigations Psychotic Detectives” with Thomas White, “Who Whacked The Blogger” with Benjamin Sobieck,and the soon to be released “Thad and The G-Man’s Most Awesome Adventure” with Thad Brown and “Hotel Beaumont” with B.R. Stateham. All the stories are available @ Amazon, Barnes & Nobles and Smashwords. I am also the host of the wildly popular The G-ZONE blogtalk radio show. Thanks for stopping by today; We will see you tomorrow. Have a great day. http://www.gelatisscoop.blogspot.com

  22. 4 out of 5

    Joan Reeves

    War Is Hell Note: I "read" this book by listening to the audio book edition, purchased from Audible.com. Blurbing The Book SEAL Team Six is a secret unit tasked with counter-terrorism, hostage rescue, and counterinsurgency. This book is the story of Howard Wasdin who survived what would have killed most men. His story takes you deep into the world of Navy SEALS and Special Forces snipers. From a childhood of deprivation and abuse to the grueling selection process of BUDS (Basic Underwater War Is Hell Note: I "read" this book by listening to the audio book edition, purchased from Audible.com. Blurbing The Book SEAL Team Six is a secret unit tasked with counter-terrorism, hostage rescue, and counterinsurgency. This book is the story of Howard Wasdin who survived what would have killed most men. His story takes you deep into the world of Navy SEALS and Special Forces snipers. From a childhood of deprivation and abuse to the grueling selection process of BUDS (Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL) to the hell of Mogadishu, Wasdin tells it all. My 2 Cents If you've followed the news this last year, you've heard all about the SEALs and SEAL Team Six in particular. For a super secret unit, the team has been getting a lot of publicity since finding Bin Laden and delivering justice. I've watched the documentaries on the National Geographic channel about the SEALS, and I've seen Howard Wasdin, the SEAL who is the focus of the book, on many of these shows as he provides insight and commentary about everything SEAL. If you truly want to know that war is hell, read this book. If you want the truth about the realities of what our soldiers, the regular ones and the special ops, have to deal with in doing their job when it comes to politicians, officers jockeying for position, and all the other crap these warriors have to contend with, read this book. I'm amazed that anything effective ever gets done in this so-called war against terrorism. Not because these warriors aren't committed and willing to give their lives in the effort, but because their hands are so often tied. These soldiers don't fight to bring democracy to other lands or to impose the American will on anyone else. They lay down their lives for their brothers in arms. They lay down their lives because they have sworn to protect this country. They don't choose the fight or the battle. They don't make the decisions or policies. They are the ones at risk when executive and congressional decisions, often made to improve a rating in opinion polls, send them into harm's way. Then they have every kind of roadblock thrown in their way in trying to achieve an objective. This book is compelling, eye-opening, and validates what I've been told by servicemen. This book will make you cry; it will enrage you. It will stay with you. Get this book! The Narrator Ray Porter is the narrator of this book, and he is amazing. I can't imagine anyone else doing this book. His voice sounds like what you think a Navy SEAL would sound like. He brings the right tone to the dramatic events and infuses a droll note to some events that are unexpectedly humorous. Humorous? Yes, as in the same noir-type humor exhibited by cops when dealing with terrible crime scenes. P. S. God bless and protect these men who are the silent warriors.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rhianna

    Despite not being that far along in another few books, while standing in the overpriced book store in Palm Beach International earlier this morning I overheard a few men talking about how all the top ten books were garbage, and this one fit the bill. In order not to look like a creeper, I only caught a few bits and pieces of their conversation: lies, bad mouthing his family, fabrications, and a main character no one liked. Sweet. So without learning about these rumors and such, I picked up said Despite not being that far along in another few books, while standing in the overpriced book store in Palm Beach International earlier this morning I overheard a few men talking about how all the top ten books were garbage, and this one fit the bill. In order not to look like a creeper, I only caught a few bits and pieces of their conversation: lies, bad mouthing his family, fabrications, and a main character no one liked. Sweet. So without learning about these rumors and such, I picked up said overpriced book and rainbow Mentos (quick aside: they all taste like chemicals and plastic). I finished this book over the course of a three hour flight between PBI and Boston, and while I rolled my eyes at a few things, I really wasn't disappointed. I liked the colloquial nature of the story, even though they really should have used a grammar editor. I did find Howard to be cocky and somewhat easy to dislike, but if I did like him, I don't think he would have made a good SEAL. I honestly read most of it in my brother's voice-- eloquent and modest are not two words I'd use to describe him, but 'damn good marine" is. So to me, the attitude was acceptable. Now, it wasn't until after I read this book that I learned of unnecessary elaborations and flat out lies that possibly surround this book. Whether or not Wasdin was this liked by people or he wasn't a family man, I really enjoyed reading about what they had gone through, especially the training and ops missions. Those are what kept me reading, not necessarily the personal interest points (which weren't that bad). Overall, I'd recommend this to someone looking for a quick military read. Especially if you're a gun junky who loves hearing about the details of scopes and rounds. For pure entertainment value, it was pretty good. Whether or not a chunk of the story is false and the truth missing or you think the main character is an asshole who can't write, it's a quick and interesting read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rickky Mcghee

    Seal Team Six is about a boy named Howard Wasdin who was raised in a very bad home. Everyday when his step father got home he would beat him, it even got to the point that Howard couldn't sit down, but after the beating stopped, Howard says that he can now tolerated pain like that without feeling a thing. Which later on would help him survive Hell Week. Which is the worst week in every single seals lifetime? If you don't know what Hell Week is, it is when the navy seal's do the hardest and Seal Team Six is about a boy named Howard Wasdin who was raised in a very bad home. Everyday when his step father got home he would beat him, it even got to the point that Howard couldn't sit down, but after the beating stopped, Howard says that he can now tolerated pain like that without feeling a thing. Which later on would help him survive Hell Week. Which is the worst week in every single seals lifetime? If you don't know what Hell Week is, it is when the navy seal's do the hardest and toughest things there is to work the body and mind. The seals that make it this far only get three to four hours of sleep during the whole week and that is usually towards the end of the week, the rest of the time they are constantly moving around. Later on it talks about the journey Howard had to make in order to become a member of the elite of the navy seal's which is already elite of it's self, Seal Team Six. If you're as interested in the navy seals as I am than you will love this book. Even if you don't like the Navy Seal's this book is still right for you it teaches you a lot of great strategies that you can use in life. So I would recommend this book to anybody willing to learn about the navy seals or learn good mind sets that you need in life. But I do have to warn you if you don’t like some fowl language than this book might not be for you, because at some parts there is some words. One part I found really interesting was to me was when Howard and his mom were in the car going to court to get the papers signed so Leon (his stepdad or soon to be) can become the legal guardian of Howard. In the car his Mom told Howard “now honey when they ask you if you want Leon to be your father you say yes you hear”. So that is my opinion on this book it is a wonderful book that you should read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Angel Martinez

    This book was very insightful. It goes into the mind of an elite special operator, talking about his rough childhood, to the challenges he endured during training and what happened after his major battle in Somalia where he was involved in the mission. His opinions, regarding the politics of the government and of the military i respected and could see why he would think things like, officials making decisions on things that they don't understand and the competition between Delta Force and SEAL This book was very insightful. It goes into the mind of an elite special operator, talking about his rough childhood, to the challenges he endured during training and what happened after his major battle in Somalia where he was involved in the mission. His opinions, regarding the politics of the government and of the military i respected and could see why he would think things like, officials making decisions on things that they don't understand and the competition between Delta Force and SEAL Team Six and how that could take up time and make things worse for an already bad situation. HIs experiences were interesting and i enjoyed hearing about them, the part where he is being abused by his step father and grew up to hate him but realizing as he grew older that his step dad only knew how to raise him in that way because of a lack of understanding and ignorance and ultimately forgiving him because in the end he grew up to be a better person for it. Even though it all worked out in the end this example shouldn't be an excuse for the abuse of a child even if the child is resilient enough to take it. This book is filed with great humor that had my laughing hard and details that really put the reader in the story and educates them of what happens during training and during a mission. this was a great read and i highly recommend it for any reader interested n all things military.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Erik1997

    This is the book Seal Team Six by both Howard Wasdin and Stephen Templin. I picked up this book because we had to choose a book to read for Intro to Writing, and this was a choice. I've always been interested in military related things, especially the Navy, and definitely about the glorious Navy Seal Team Six. The book begins with Wasdin's personal childhood which was a very tough one compared to most. Eventually he decided to enlist in the Navy originally for Search and Rescue but after nearing This is the book Seal Team Six by both Howard Wasdin and Stephen Templin. I picked up this book because we had to choose a book to read for Intro to Writing, and this was a choice. I've always been interested in military related things, especially the Navy, and definitely about the glorious Navy Seal Team Six. The book begins with Wasdin's personal childhood which was a very tough one compared to most. Eventually he decided to enlist in the Navy originally for Search and Rescue but after nearing the end of his contract for that, he made the choice of either going home to his family, or beginning the long grueling task of BUDS training to become a seal. He chose to further is training. After a long program there, and surviving Hell Week without ringing the bell, he graduated and became a Seal. Partway through his new contract he made the choice to try out for Seal Team Six...and he got in. The rest of the book shows his extreme times doing missions with the Seals, and ends rather surprisingly but not shockingly. I thought this was an amazing book because it always kept me hooked with action or with parts of Naval training I wanted better information on that was hard to get from nothing other than a first hand experience. Those who enjoy good action packed books, and especially those interested any type of military training or life, this would be a perfect book for you. It was very detailed on his training and on his missions. Would definitely read again.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Dunning

    Seal Team Six Memories of an Elite Navy Seal Sniper, by Howard E. Watson and Stephen Templin. The story of a mans struggles through life to become part of the most Elite team on the plant. This story takes you through his troubled childhood with an abusive step father and having to work every day in his life out in the field. He shares his struggles throughout navy seal school and in real combat. It is never easy for any one to deal with fighting in a real war. Seals are almost always out Seal Team Six Memories of an Elite Navy Seal Sniper, by Howard E. Watson and Stephen Templin. The story of a mans struggles through life to become part of the most Elite team on the plant. This story takes you through his troubled childhood with an abusive step father and having to work every day in his life out in the field. He shares his struggles throughout navy seal school and in real combat. It is never easy for any one to deal with fighting in a real war. Seals are almost always out numbered and out gunned but they never give up. I would Highly recommend this book for everyone willing to read. If you are looking to join the seals his book will give you excellent insight on what it takes to become a seal and how to get there. It is not only for insight on the navy it is also a really well told story witch provides a enjoyable read. Howard E. Wasdin has two kids and a wife who all never know if he will ever come back home from combat. The time, commitment, and danger of being a navy seal is expressed. They teach mental a physical toughness, one essential factor for every day life. The book is 305 pages long. There are 17 chapters. Young kids should probably not read this book because of the level of reading and violence. This has been one of the best books I have ever read. Being a Navy seal is never easy but it is also never impossible.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Zachary Marciano

    As an inexperienced memoir reader I really didn't know what to expect from this book in terms of literary devices and knowledge being deployed. However from the first couple of pages into the book I was hooked, I am a pretty big fan of military history and this book not only fits the genre, it gives extraneous details and insight from someone who has seen war first hand. One of the things I really like is that the story is told so well, that it doesn't even feel liked I was reading a memoir, it As an inexperienced memoir reader I really didn't know what to expect from this book in terms of literary devices and knowledge being deployed. However from the first couple of pages into the book I was hooked, I am a pretty big fan of military history and this book not only fits the genre, it gives extraneous details and insight from someone who has seen war first hand. One of the things I really like is that the story is told so well, that it doesn't even feel liked I was reading a memoir, it felt more like I was reading fiction but I was actually there.The author, having survived excruciating battles, writes in a very well mannered and respected manner, he is definitely not your run of the mill adrenaline junkie, as i have said before he really knows how to write and tell a story well. The personal experience he tells about his life, ranging from his childhood to now, by the end of the book you really feel as if you know him really well, and that you could recall being in those experiences. For having an intricate and interesting writing style and for validly utilizing multiple aspects of a literary arsenal through the hardened eyes of a veteran, I honestly recommend this book to anyone who is in for a good read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    Wasn't Sure I was going to enjoy reading the Memoirs of a Sniper. But I picked this book up cause I was in a pinch and needed something to read and it was the only Autobiographical/ Memoirs at Walmart at the time. I flipped to a page and read one line. It looked good so I flipped to another and read one line, turning into two paragraphs. Tried it once more, and figured it was worth a shot. Im sure glad I did, best 15.99 I've spent in along time. This book was the biggest page turner I've read in Wasn't Sure I was going to enjoy reading the Memoirs of a Sniper. But I picked this book up cause I was in a pinch and needed something to read and it was the only Autobiographical/ Memoirs at Walmart at the time. I flipped to a page and read one line. It looked good so I flipped to another and read one line, turning into two paragraphs. Tried it once more, and figured it was worth a shot. Im sure glad I did, best 15.99 I've spent in along time. This book was the biggest page turner I've read in a long time ...if not ever. I really had trouble putting it down, as these authors made even the semi-mundane ( for a book about an elite Seal sniper) seem interesting. Finished this book in record time. Because there are many references to the blackhwak down book, and the authors gave credit to that title in their acknowledgements as having inspired them to write their book. I will plan too read that title in the near future. As an added note many of my co-workers, who saw this book in my lunch kit, mentioned having read and liked Blackhawk Down, as well as the title I Alone Survived. And having liked them both.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Corey

    Howard Wasdin takes you behind the scenes in this memoir, showing you not just the physical steps needed to join the U.S. Navy's elite tier one counter-terrorism unit, but also the mentality required to succeed. He talks frankly about his rough childhood and how it helped him survive Hell Week, a notorious event every Seal must endure. He also talks about family life and how his marriage and children were affected by his long absences fighting in wars and training during peacetime. What is most Howard Wasdin takes you behind the scenes in this memoir, showing you not just the physical steps needed to join the U.S. Navy's elite tier one counter-terrorism unit, but also the mentality required to succeed. He talks frankly about his rough childhood and how it helped him survive Hell Week, a notorious event every Seal must endure. He also talks about family life and how his marriage and children were affected by his long absences fighting in wars and training during peacetime. What is most striking isn't his recounting of BUD/S, completing missions in the Gulf War, or even the part he played in the Battle of Mogadishu, made famous by the book Black Hawk Down the film of the same name. It is his experiences after he left the Navy and how he coped with leaving one of the premier special operations units in the world that makes this book worth reading. Mr. Wasdin's prose mixes humor, heartbreak, and the adrenaline of war in such a smooth way, I found myself forgetting this was memoir and reading it more like a novel. I highly recommend it even if you aren't interested in military culture.

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