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From Jim Crow to Civil Rights: The Supreme Court and the Struggle for Racial Equality

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A monumental investigation of the Supreme Court's rulings on race, From Jim Crow To Civil Rights spells out in compelling detail the political and social context within which the Supreme Court Justices operate and the consequences of their decisions for American race relations. In a highly provocative interpretation of the decision's connection to the civil rights A monumental investigation of the Supreme Court's rulings on race, From Jim Crow To Civil Rights spells out in compelling detail the political and social context within which the Supreme Court Justices operate and the consequences of their decisions for American race relations. In a highly provocative interpretation of the decision's connection to the civil rights movement, Klarman argues that Brown was more important for mobilizing southern white opposition to racial change than for encouraging direct-action protest. Brown unquestioningly had a significant impact--it brought race issues to public attention and it mobilized supporters of the ruling. It also, however, energized the opposition. In this authoritative account of constitutional law concerning race, Michael Klarman details, in the richest and most thorough discussion to date, how and whether Supreme Court decisions do, in fact, matter.


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A monumental investigation of the Supreme Court's rulings on race, From Jim Crow To Civil Rights spells out in compelling detail the political and social context within which the Supreme Court Justices operate and the consequences of their decisions for American race relations. In a highly provocative interpretation of the decision's connection to the civil rights A monumental investigation of the Supreme Court's rulings on race, From Jim Crow To Civil Rights spells out in compelling detail the political and social context within which the Supreme Court Justices operate and the consequences of their decisions for American race relations. In a highly provocative interpretation of the decision's connection to the civil rights movement, Klarman argues that Brown was more important for mobilizing southern white opposition to racial change than for encouraging direct-action protest. Brown unquestioningly had a significant impact--it brought race issues to public attention and it mobilized supporters of the ruling. It also, however, energized the opposition. In this authoritative account of constitutional law concerning race, Michael Klarman details, in the richest and most thorough discussion to date, how and whether Supreme Court decisions do, in fact, matter.

30 review for From Jim Crow to Civil Rights: The Supreme Court and the Struggle for Racial Equality

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    i found this book to be a bit dense and not what i was hoping for... well written, with scads of references to court cases and to the lives and decisions of politicians, legislators, and judges... spells out clearly how undeniably racist America has always been, though not necessarily as stridently as i would... basically, it absolves the Supreme Court of any responsibility for pushing back against racism and segregation and hate by making the point "the Court reflected the views of America at i found this book to be a bit dense and not what i was hoping for... well written, with scads of references to court cases and to the lives and decisions of politicians, legislators, and judges... spells out clearly how undeniably racist America has always been, though not necessarily as stridently as i would... basically, it absolves the Supreme Court of any responsibility for pushing back against racism and segregation and hate by making the point "the Court reflected the views of America at the time"... well, "the time" wasn't just then, it has been then and now, the entire history of the US and its judiciary... racists on the Supreme Court, would of course support/defend/ignore racist laws and racist policies and racist presidents and racist legislators... i understand the role of the courts, but find it amazing that this book makes the claim the Supreme Court felt it outside its power to rule against racism and racist laws since "most people were racists"... seriously? so America makes the claim it is the "land of the free..." and simultaneously its branches of government can sow hatred and raicst doctrine to subjugate black people? wow. anyway... the book was informative, but lacked a position, whih bothered me as a reader but was surely in line with what the author planned to do... so more my problem than the book's failure... the book doesn't energize me to understand the Supreme Court and its failure to do anything about racism, it just pisses me off because the Supreme Court in no way, shape, or form should have been supporting racism... but racists make racist laws, and racist judges support them... ugh.

  2. 5 out of 5

    E. Nicholas

    An extensive and exhaustive history of every major civil rights case that came before the United States Supreme Court, starting with Reconstruction and ending with Brown v. Board of Education and the Civil Rights movement. The book is meticulous in detail and, at times, can seem quite dense, but it's well worth the effort for anyone who's interested in American legal history. The book also does a great job reminding us that progress almost never occurs in a straight line, there is almost always An extensive and exhaustive history of every major civil rights case that came before the United States Supreme Court, starting with Reconstruction and ending with Brown v. Board of Education and the Civil Rights movement. The book is meticulous in detail and, at times, can seem quite dense, but it's well worth the effort for anyone who's interested in American legal history. The book also does a great job reminding us that progress almost never occurs in a straight line, there is almost always a backlash and often it's murderous and ugly. So it was with Jim Crow after Reconstruction, white southern terrorism after Brown v. Board of Education, and now -- sadly -- we're seeing it with the rise of Trumpism after the landmark presidency of Barack Obama.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ezzy

    Informative about the legal process to obtaining civil rights for African Americans, but extremely dry and felt quite repetitive. I read this book along with "Why We Can't Wait" by Martin Luther King Jr, which is so moving, this book seemed to say nothing by comparison. However, it's loaded with information and aspects about the legislative and legal barriers that I knew nothing about. It's hard to imagine all of it today.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sonya

    This was very specific and took me awhile to finish because I was not familiar with everything so it required some research into other topics so that I could follow the readings, but it was well worth while and I will probably re-read and use a reference tool for my art and papers.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa Holloway

    Highly recommend. VH

  6. 4 out of 5

    Whitney

    Klarman was my professor at UVa, and this book reads just like his lectures. The book is dense, but is well written and the legal history is fascinating enough to have kept me interested.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kendall Hill

  8. 5 out of 5

    Julie

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tegtman

  10. 4 out of 5

    Annabelle

  11. 5 out of 5

    Justin

  12. 4 out of 5

    Julia

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gabriel

  14. 4 out of 5

    kelli

  15. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lisi

  17. 5 out of 5

    Christine

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sheikh Tajamul

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brian Schulman

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tina

  21. 4 out of 5

    Billy Connard

  22. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

  23. 5 out of 5

    Endya

  24. 4 out of 5

    Pam Texada

  25. 4 out of 5

    Brittan

  26. 4 out of 5

    Maria

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jessi

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jaclyn

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kristyna Divisova

  30. 5 out of 5

    Zavier McFall-Maycock

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