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Writing Space: Computers, Hypertext, and the Remediation of Print

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This second edition of Jay David Bolter's classic text expands on the objectives of the original volume, illustrating the relationship of print to new media, and examining how hypertext and other forms of electronic writing refashion or "remediate" the forms and genres of print. Reflecting the dynamic changes in electronic technology since the first edition, this revision This second edition of Jay David Bolter's classic text expands on the objectives of the original volume, illustrating the relationship of print to new media, and examining how hypertext and other forms of electronic writing refashion or "remediate" the forms and genres of print. Reflecting the dynamic changes in electronic technology since the first edition, this revision incorporates the Web and other current standards of electronic writing. As a text for students in composition, new technologies, information studies, and related areas, this volume provides a unique examination of the computer as a technology for reading and writing.


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This second edition of Jay David Bolter's classic text expands on the objectives of the original volume, illustrating the relationship of print to new media, and examining how hypertext and other forms of electronic writing refashion or "remediate" the forms and genres of print. Reflecting the dynamic changes in electronic technology since the first edition, this revision This second edition of Jay David Bolter's classic text expands on the objectives of the original volume, illustrating the relationship of print to new media, and examining how hypertext and other forms of electronic writing refashion or "remediate" the forms and genres of print. Reflecting the dynamic changes in electronic technology since the first edition, this revision incorporates the Web and other current standards of electronic writing. As a text for students in composition, new technologies, information studies, and related areas, this volume provides a unique examination of the computer as a technology for reading and writing.

30 review for Writing Space: Computers, Hypertext, and the Remediation of Print

  1. 5 out of 5

    DWRL Library

    As a "good read," this is a fascinating book, exploring the history of writing technology from chiseling in stone to papyrus scroll to the computer. Bolter looks at how changes in technology challenge more traditional forms of engaging material -- the changes necessitated by the medium into arranging verbal ideas in visual spaces. In exploring how the computer has redefined the writing space, Bolter examines ways in which the internet has privileged the visual over the verbal, and the interactiv As a "good read," this is a fascinating book, exploring the history of writing technology from chiseling in stone to papyrus scroll to the computer. Bolter looks at how changes in technology challenge more traditional forms of engaging material -- the changes necessitated by the medium into arranging verbal ideas in visual spaces. In exploring how the computer has redefined the writing space, Bolter examines ways in which the internet has privileged the visual over the verbal, and the interactive over the static. For the classroom, this book makes a good argument for teaching writing in less traditional ways. Bolter presents good reasons why the writing process will never be the same. The writing space has been redefined, and web-based writing should perhaps be a part of the writing curriculum. For the first-year teacher, this book may offer insight into your more visually-oriented students, and good arguments for incorporating computer mediated writing in the classroom.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Anastasia

    Reread to teach, and it's interesting to revisit the hypertext history now.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    I read with fascination Bolter's descriptions of the history of writing and the advent of computer writing and its implications for the future. There is no question that writers and critics will have to utilize, adapt to, and comment on computer technologies and their possibilities and limitations. Bolter believes that hypertext and its fracturing, network affect on texts will seriously alter the way people write and perceive. He sees a world in which texts will circulate and be added to and get I read with fascination Bolter's descriptions of the history of writing and the advent of computer writing and its implications for the future. There is no question that writers and critics will have to utilize, adapt to, and comment on computer technologies and their possibilities and limitations. Bolter believes that hypertext and its fracturing, network affect on texts will seriously alter the way people write and perceive. He sees a world in which texts will circulate and be added to and get set up in such a way that the reader will have a free hand in their organization. I have to say that I am a little skeptical about this. It seems to me that the public will still want to read things that make clear, identifiable points, thus providing them with useful information, opinions, and coherent aesthetic experiences. Hypertext will be a part of the future, but its creators will not be able to go nuts and create huge, sprawling webs of information that will take a lot of effort to make sense out of. Clear, unaltered text will still be in demand. Writers, scientists, and critics will still want to retain a fair amount of control over the texts that they work so hard to create, and not simply throw them out there to be rearranged by anybody. For the hypertext aesthetic to really take hold, it will have to offer some practically useful methods of organizing information - like Wikipedia does, for example.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sabine

    First I have to admit, I haven't read the whole book. But that was mostly due to what I have to say next and why I gave a 2-start rating! This book might have been fantastic in 2001! But it's not anymore. I found it absolutely frustrating how outdated it was (why then, you might ask yourself, did I read it in the first place? well I've read books from the 80s (McLuhan to throw a name in there) that were brilliant and still up-to-date! This however, not so much.) Also the overuse of 'refashioned' First I have to admit, I haven't read the whole book. But that was mostly due to what I have to say next and why I gave a 2-start rating! This book might have been fantastic in 2001! But it's not anymore. I found it absolutely frustrating how outdated it was (why then, you might ask yourself, did I read it in the first place? well I've read books from the 80s (McLuhan to throw a name in there) that were brilliant and still up-to-date! This however, not so much.) Also the overuse of 'refashioned' and 'remediated' didn't impress me too much. I also had the feeling he kept repeating himself, stating the same opinion over and over again. So I'm slightly disappointed and I do not recommend this book as I think it isn't up-to-date anymore.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    In Writing Space (2001), Jay David Bolter focuses our attention on material practices, arguing that writing spaces are both material and visual fields, "whose properties are determined by a writing technology and the uses to which that technology is put by a culture of readers and writers" (12). He defines technology as both skills and machines, drawing on the etymology of technology in techne; thus, writing is also a technology (14-15). We need to understand that technologies do not necessarily In Writing Space (2001), Jay David Bolter focuses our attention on material practices, arguing that writing spaces are both material and visual fields, "whose properties are determined by a writing technology and the uses to which that technology is put by a culture of readers and writers" (12). He defines technology as both skills and machines, drawing on the etymology of technology in techne; thus, writing is also a technology (14-15). We need to understand that technologies do not necessarily replace each other, but remediate each other: for instance, "hypertext is not the end of print; it is instead the remediation of print" (46).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Bolter brings forward many great ideas in this book and raises some potentially very interesting discussions. Occasionally it is difficult to understand the points he is making and what side of the fence Bolter is on. All in all a good book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Somewhat dull and seemingly dated, especially with its large sections dedicated to hypertext (which were to be expected given the title, but dry nonetheless). Personally, not very useful for my masters paper either.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Celeste

    Some out of date info and biased comments make this less helpful than it could have been

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Salisbury

  10. 5 out of 5

    Antonio

  11. 4 out of 5

    Drina

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

  13. 5 out of 5

    Anna

  14. 5 out of 5

    Audra

  15. 4 out of 5

    Delilah Haas

  16. 4 out of 5

    Randall

  17. 4 out of 5

    Anna Puleo

  18. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Burket

  19. 4 out of 5

    Richard

  20. 4 out of 5

    Anna Carpenter

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rosario Maria

  22. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Pennington

  24. 4 out of 5

    David

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kendra

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kara Poe Alexander

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kieran

  29. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin

  30. 5 out of 5

    MAM

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